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Featured Articles from the Huntington Beach Independent

News | September 4, 2003
The class started out with 34 recruits -- upon graduation, there were only 20. "It takes a lot of effort, heart and help to complete this course," said Gary T. Knostman, graduate of Golden West College's Criminal Justice Training Center. "I couldn't have done it on my own." The 125th graduating class of Golden West College's Criminal Justice Training Center held its ceremonies in the larger and more spacious Robert B. Moore Theater at Orange Coast College on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | February 25, 2010
Patrick Cottle does most of his work in a small shop in Norwalk, but he stays on call 24 hours a day. After all, he never knows when somebody is going to need a drum. Cottle, the owner of BoneYard Drums, has had bands call him at 10 p.m. en route to a gig, needing a small part for their drum kit. He’s had producers phone him at odd hours from the recording studio. Sometimes, drummers land at the airport and call him to provide an entire set for their upcoming show. For nearly three years, Cottle has made a living finding old and beat-up drums, outfitting them with new parts and selling them back to the music industry.
NEWS
By: Chris Yemma | July 26, 2005
His nickname could be "Aqua Lung." His slogan could be: Banker by day, world-class swimmer by night. He is Richard Saeger, a 1984 Olympic gold medalist who has recently delved, or dived, back into the pool, breaking records all over again. Saeger, 41, who regularly trains at Newport Harbor and Corona del Mar High school pools, is fresh off a world-record performance in the 100-meter freestyle in the 40-44 age division at the Mission Viejo Masters Meet July 3. An Irvine resident since 1999, Saeger got back into competitive swimming in 2000 after taking a 14-year hiatus to focus on his career -- banking, basically.
NEWS
August 22, 2002
REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK Cops aren't like regular people -- at least that's what most people seem to think. It seems that most people have a bad opinion of cops, or none at all. I have to admit that I haven't always had a very good opinion of them. That changed when I got into journalism. My first job at a newspaper put me in contact with police officers on a weekly basis and I learned a lot about them. They are just like everyone else. They have families, they have lives outside of the police department and the same things that bother us, bother them.
NEWS
October 31, 2002
Mike Sciacca Supernatural forces and spirits of the dead are certain to stumble around Downtown today and into the night as children and the not-so-young dress the part in celebration of Halloween. Most Halloween festivities, based on folk legend, tell of supernatural beings from the dark side: ghosts, witches, vampires and werewolves. All figure to be on the prowl tonight, some seeking candy, others simply trying to put up a fright. But every day, toward the east end of Main Street, where ghouls and goblins figure to roam sidewalks freely, a different kind of supernatural force can be found.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
"Safe and sane" fireworks will be available for purchase at 10 stands around Huntington Beach. According to the city website, fireworks will be sold from July 1 to July 4. Hours are noon to 10 p.m. through July 3 and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on July 4. Ten nonprofits will sell the fireworks at the following locations: • Huntington Beach High School baseball team : 19640 Beach Blvd. at the Newland Center. • Goldenwest s wim team : 6967 Warner Ave. at Big Lots. • South Huntington Beach Girls Fastpitch : 21132 Beach Blvd.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | May 23, 2012
Father Christian Mondor has been named community grand marshal for this year's Huntington Beach Fourth of July Parade, which means he won't be riding on his usual float with other religious leaders. But he can still have the horse-drawn trolley - and the banjo, if he wants. The 87-year-old vicar emeritus at Sts. Simon & Jude Catholic Church has a history of riding in Surf City's annual parade with the Greater Huntington Beach Interfaith Council. In recent years, he's sat in his Franciscan friar's robe with representatives from Judaism, Islam and other faiths, cradling a banjo and strumming along with Beach Boys and Jan and Dean tunes.
LOCAL
May 13, 2008
The U.S. Postal Inspection Service is looking into whether a Huntington Beach woman intentionally let her cocker spaniel loose on a mail carrier, authorities said. The postal worker, former Olympic swimmer Shirley Babashoff, called 911 last week saying she was hiding from the dog in her truck. Babashoff, of Fountain Valley, told a dispatcher that a resident got angry as she approached the door to have her sign a piece of registered mail, authorities said. She said the resident, Patricia Johnson, let out her black and white cocker spaniel and unleashed a verbal tirade at her, authorities said.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | August 28, 2008
Huntington Beach resident Ian Allen told friends he planned to kill his girlfriend’s mother as painfully as possible, just days before her body was found in Newport Beach shores with dozens of stab wounds, witnesses said on the first day of trial. “He wanted to make it slow and painful,” former friend Ryan Neptune said about a get-together the weekend before the killing. “He also offered myself and my friend Alex money to drive to a location in the desert, [to]
NEWS
Chris Epting | June 9, 2010
M ay the Tiki gods smile on Chris Jepsen tonight when he takes the stage at Don the Beachcomber (formerly Sam's Seafood) amid waterfalls and carved island statues. After all, it's like a dream come true for the Huntington Beach native, whose passion for Polynesian pop culture runs as thick as fresh lava flowing down the side of an island volcano. Jepsen is vice president of the Orange County Historical Society and assistant archivist at the Orange County Archives, as well as a member of the city of Huntington Beach's Historic Resources Board.
NEWS
By Chris Epting | February 12, 2010
“I hope you’ll find your own way when I’m not with you.” The lyrics jump out to the listener. The sparse, haunting, discordant ballad, consisting only of Jimmy “The Rev” Sullivan on piano, drums and vocal, fills the room — the same room where, last May, my teenage son and I visited with Joe and Barbara Sullivan, parents of the drummer from Avenged Sevenfold. We were there for a column I was writing about how proud the parents were of their son’s success.
NEWS
By Chris Epting | November 16, 2011
When Chris Wink, Matt Goldman and Phil Stanton first applied the blue greasepaint in the late 1980s in New York City, it's hard to imagine that phenomenon that would become Blue Man Group. Today, millions of fans around the world have become mesmerized by the show featuring three quizzical, curious, provocative blue characters who challenge social norms and make broad, bold (and often humorous) statements about this crazy world we share. The troupe has grown to include many members today, and the show recently landed at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa for a run that continues through Nov. 20. I had the pleasure of seeing the show, a vividly entertaining spectacle that's as smart as it is funny.
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