Advertisement

The Gossiping Gourmet: Sample a bit of everything at Sullivan

March 30, 2011|By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz
  • Aromatic shrimp flash fried in a slightly spicy tangy red sauce served with broccoli at Sullivan Restaurant in Huntington Beach.
Aromatic shrimp flash fried in a slightly spicy tangy… (SCOTT SMELTZER,…)

Sullivan may be the most curiously named Chinese restaurant we've ever been to, but more about that later. First, let us introduce you to Shiu Mei Liu, the effusive, warm and generous proprietor who welcomes you into her world with her wide, charming smile. This small, bright and pleasant storefront restaurant in Huntington Beach is definitely worth a visit.

Think of all the times that you and a companion or two have gone into a Chinese restaurant and envied some large party with a Lazy Susan in the middle of their table, sampling a banquet of dishes. A really unusual feature at Sullivan is that they offer small and large portions of most dishes, so you can expand the number of selections that you order and have a mini-banquet for yourselves. We had quite the feast. Be forewarned, it might be a good idea to order appetizers and starters first and wait until they arrive before ordering entrées. We did it all at once, and entrées came out before the starters because they take longer to prepare.

Advertisement

The menu is classic American Chinese, meaning you won't find sea cucumber or jellyfish. Spicy dishes are marked with a red chili pepper, and you can specify how much heat you can handle. We asked for good and spicy, but the dishes were only moderately nippy.

Shiu Mei herself makes the fabulous onion pancake, a Beijing layered flatbread laced with green onions. Listed as a starter, it's delicious on its own but also can be used like a tortilla to wrap around some saucy protein. Be sure to order more than one to avoid conflict.

The excellent potstickers come in a portion of eight and are plumply filled with a well-seasoned, moist and juicy mixture that is almost all finely chopped chicken with a bit of ginger, green onion and a touch of cabbage. The dough was thin and chewy and fried on one side to a golden brown crispiness. We particularly liked the dipping sauce that had a lovely balance of soy, vinegar and sugar.

Chopped red bells and green onions topped the crispy deep-fried salt and pepper chicken wings. The sautéed veggies made a pretty garnish but were too salty to eat on their own. The wings themselves were very crispy, but the meat was overcooked and dry.

Huntington Beach Independent Articles Huntington Beach Independent Articles
|
|
|