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The Gossiping Gourmet: Antonello continues fine dining tradition

May 04, 2011|By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz

Antonello, which opened its doors in 1979, is as venerable as an Orange County restaurant gets. This grand old dame has been serving exemplary and well-praised Northern Italian cuisine for more than 32 years.

The ersatz Old World palazzo is a step back in time with its trompe l'oeil stone archways and climbing vines, while high-beamed ceilings and chandeliers define the main dining area. Having doubled in size since its debut, owner Antonio Cagnolo has added eight private dining rooms for parties and events.

In the kitchen, replacing longtime chef Franco Barone, is a unique duo of executive chefs, Gino Bounanoce and Salvatore Ferrara, continuing the tradition of flavorful Italian cuisine.

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We sat in a nook and though the house was full, we received service that was warm, friendly and very attentive without being intrusive. The acoustics are such that, even busy as it was, conversation was not a challenge.

We were there during restaurant week for their $40-, four-course menu but we were pleased to see that a $35.95 three-course prix fixe menu is always available, belying the notion that you have to be on an expense account to eat here.

We began with a lovely pulpo carpaccio: paper-thin slices of octopus fanned out around the plate, bathed in lemony vinaigrette and garnished with a generous arugula salad. The shaved octopus was delicate in flavor, tender in texture and the beautifully balanced dressing provided a piquant burst of citrusy freshness while the arugula added zesty peppery punch, magnified by bits of freshly ground black pepper.

On other evenings the carpaccio is made with wild boar, which is surprisingly tame in flavor. Another classic, rarely seen on this side of the Atlantic is seppi, cuttlefish, a cousin of squid, which was sautéed with white wine, shallots, fresh tomatoes and peas.

The pasta course featured simple ricotta spinach ravioli in tomato sauce and a more nuanced porcini fettuccine. The lightly stuffed ravioli had a thin chewy wrapper and a nice basic San Marzano-type tomato sauce.

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