Advertisement

In the Pipeline: Air quality leaders' responses not based in facts

April 04, 2013|By Chris Epting

OK, hot off the presses, grim lowlights from the new Air Quality Management District (AQMD) staff report, published Wednesday, with proposed amended rules for 444, the beach bonfire ban.

To anyone that has not quite grasped just how agenda-driven this organization is, and how intensely focused they are in imposing their draconian ban on beach bonfires, please take a moment to read some of their opinions following the meeting last Friday where many of us from Huntington Beach got up and spoke our minds — and common sense.

Here we go.

1. Comment: The beach fire rings are not a significant source of air pollution and should not be regulated. There are many other sources of air pollution that should be regulated. The fire rings are a Southern California tradition and should be preserved for future generations.

Advertisement

AQMD Staff Response: As noted in the staff report, wood smoke poses a potential health exposure risk to beach goers and nearby residents. Wood smoke from beach fires can affect the public health and is a local exposure risk to the surrounding community. This is further magnified as many of those using the fire rings have been observed burning materials other than fire wood. Federal, State, and local air pollution regulations have been implemented for all forms of particulate pollution and every effort continues to be made to address emissions from all source categories. Low emission alternatives, such as use of gaseous fuels, may be a potential solution that would allow the continued use of fire rings in Southern California.

2. Comment: Proponents of removing the fire rings argue that this would deprive them of "access" to burning wood as a low-cost activity they enjoy. But the real "accessibility" issue is that many people are prevented from accessing and using the beaches due to wood smoke's caustic, deadly fumes. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is basic civil rights law that requires cities to remove barriers to the access and use of public spaces. To those with breathing or cardiac disabilities, wood smoke presents a true "physical barrier" to use of the beach areas where wood burning is allowed.

Huntington Beach Independent Articles Huntington Beach Independent Articles
|
|
|