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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 9, 2014
The Huntington Beach City Council signed off on AES' plans to give its power plant at Pacific Coast Highway and Newland Street a beach motif and replace two tall steam stacks with shorter ones, but the energy provider must still receive a permit to begin construction. Council members unanimously voted to approve the redesign of the natural gas-powered electricity-generating facility and allow the company to construct steam stacks that exceed the 50-foot height limit in that area.
NEWS
March 22, 2001
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH - State officials are due to issue a preliminary decision soon on whether powerhouse AES Corp. can refurbish two defunct electricity generators at a facility near Pacific Coast Highway and add to the state's power coffers. The California Energy Commission's committee overseeing the AES proposal is expected to release a proposed decision by March 26, followed by public hearings and a possible commission approval by early April.
NEWS
January 13, 2005
Dave Brooks It's as familiar as images get in Huntington Beach: A group gazes over the side of the Huntington Beach Pier onto surfers below, the moment immortalized on a sleek glossy flier that looks like so many others that appear in Surf City mailboxes. What's unusual about this piece of literature is its author: Poseidon Resources, the Stamford, Conn., industrial developer planning its second push to build a desalination plant behind the AES power plant near Pacific Coast Highway.
NEWS
May 3, 2001
SACRAMENTO -- The California Energy Commission again delayed discussion of local powerhouse AES Corp.'s plan to restart two electricity generators at its 21730 Newland St. site, pending the resolution of ongoing talks between the power plant and state officials. The energy commission was slated to review AES' proposed retooling project for generating units No. 3 and No. 4, which were mothballed in 1995, Wednesday but continued the discussion to a day as yet unknown.
NEWS
December 25, 2003
Jenny Marder Huntington Beach will sue the state over its decision to devalue the AES power plant drastically, a move that slashes $1.6 million in expected property taxes from the city and postpones indefinitely plans to revitalize the Southeast section of town. City officials claim that the method used by the state Board of Equalization to assess the plant's property value was unfair, given the $250 million poured into improvements and the plant's waterfront locale.
NEWS
December 28, 2000
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The city will meet with officials from AES Corp. early next month to review an expansion plan that could bring two unused electricity generators online by summer. The move comes after the City Council decided at a Dec. 18 meeting to oppose the power plant expansion unless AES officials promised to address concerns over the facility's appearance, possibility as a beach contamination source, safe use of the chemical ammonia and the amount of nitrogen oxide produced by its generators.
NEWS
November 29, 2001
Danette Goulet AES president Ed Blackford filed a lawsuit against the city of Huntington Beach on Monday, alleging that a March ballot measure is based on inaccurate information, is misleading and contains slanderous and libelous attacks on the company. Blackford claims in the lawsuit that the Utility Tax Measure, which will ask city voters if AES should pay the same utility tax as all other businesses and residents, is based on the false premise that AES does not already pay those same taxes.
NEWS
April 12, 2001
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The California Energy Commission's siting committee held one last public hearing in the council chambers of City Hall on Monday to discuss powerhouse AES Corp.'s proposal to restart a pair of energy generators that have sat silent since 1995. The hearing, the final one before the retooling plan appears before the commission for a vote Wednesday, gave city and AES officials a chance to comment on a proposal released by the committee last month.
NEWS
March 8, 2001
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- Residents on the city's southeast side can look forward to breathing cleaner air in the upcoming months. The City Council unanimously approved a plan put forth by the AES Corp.'s Huntington Beach power plant to install a selective catalytic reduction system in its operational units to cut back on noxious chemical emissions. The system, once installed in the boiler exhaust duct of a power-generating unit, uses ammonia to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by about 90%, plant officials said.
NEWS
March 1, 2001
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- State energy officials took a personal look at AES Corp.'s plans to bring two silent energy generators online at its Surf City power plant, giving residents and city officials a forum to voice their concerns on the project. California State Energy commissioners Robert Pernell and Arthur Rosenfeld, joined by a number of commission staff, toured the site Feb. 21 with about 100 visitors. The two sit on the commission's Huntington Beach Power Plant Review Committee, which is studying the AES proposal.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 9, 2014
The Huntington Beach City Council signed off on AES' plans to give its power plant at Pacific Coast Highway and Newland Street a beach motif and replace two tall steam stacks with shorter ones, but the energy provider must still receive a permit to begin construction. Council members unanimously voted to approve the redesign of the natural gas-powered electricity-generating facility and allow the company to construct steam stacks that exceed the 50-foot height limit in that area.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | October 23, 2013
Huntington Beach council members gasped when shown renderings of what the AES power plant off Pacific Coast Highway could look like. City staff and an AES representative debuted a revamped facility during Monday's study session, depicting shorter steam towers, giant surfboards and mesh structures resembling a wave. "People are going to talk about that," Councilman Joe Shaw said. "That's going to be something people are going to take pictures of and send it back to Australia or wherever they're from.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | October 18, 2013
Huntington Beach City Council members on Monday plan to ask air quality regulators to invest money collected from a power plant for specific improvement projects within the city. The South Coast Air Quality Management District can collect an estimated $72 million from the AES power plant in Huntington Beach under the district's recently passed Rule 1304.1 - the electrical generating facilities fee, according to a city staff report. The new regulation charges power plants like AES for the emission offsets provided by the AQMD.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | May 1, 2013
An application to build a desalination plant in Huntington Beach is incomplete, according to a state agency. The California Coastal Commission's staff sent Poseidon Resources Corp. an April 22 notice saying its application to build a facility that converts seawater into freshwater fails to answer questions about how it would impact the nearby wetlands, among other issues. Stamford, Conn.-based Poseidon, however, says it has answered all previous inquires related to the proposed project on Pacific Coast Highway near Newland Street and has completed the application.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | April 18, 2012
A pair of dormant Huntington Beach electricity generators may be running again in the coming months as power officials look to meet demand in the wake of the San Onofre power plant's temporary closure. Eric Pendergraft, president of AES Southland, said crews are preparing to make repairs on two of the four power generating units at the AES plant in southeastern Huntington. The California Independent System Operator, or ISO, a nonprofit that oversees power grids throughout California, asked AES to revive the units in the event that the San Onofre plant is still down at the start of summer, when demand for electricity increases.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | June 13, 2011
Two electricity generators at a Huntington Beach power plant have been sold to allow another project to rise. AES Huntington Beach LLC, part of a company that generates electricity in 28 countries, sold two of its four power units to Santa Ana-based Edison Mission Energy, a Southern California Edison affiliate, said AES Southland President Eric Pendergraft. The sale is part of an agreement that keeps emissions within the South Coast Air Quality Management District's limits in Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside counties, Pendergraft said.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | May 20, 2010
Poseidon Resources, the company the City Council approved in 2006 to build a controversial water desalination plant in Huntington Beach, is seeking a second approval following a recent state ruling on cooling technology. Earlier this month, the State Water Resources Control Board voted to phase out once-through cooling, a process that involves drawing in and recycling seawater, in power plants across California. Poseidon had planned to build its facility next to the AES plant at 21730 Newland St. and use the plant's cooling system to bring in water.
NEWS
November 5, 2009
The lieutenant governor of California has urged Poseidon Resources, the company that plans to build a desalination plant in Huntington Beach, to seek more environmentally friendly ways of creating drinkable water. Lt. Gov. John Garamendi, in a letter July 15, told Poseidon Chairman and Chief Executive James M. Donnell that he would oppose any new desalination plants that use ocean water until all options for treating wastewater had been tested and rejected. Using wastewater would use less electricity and have a much smaller environmental impact than using ocean water, he said.
NEWS
January 14, 2009
Listening to comments and questions made by Huntington Beach City Council members regarding the latest update on the cleanup of the ASCON landfill was confusing and frustrating. On one hand the City Council seemed incredulous at the scope and magnitude that even partial cleanup of toxic substances contained in the landfill would entail. Choice No. 4, the one that seems most palatable and most often mentioned during the study session, would still not leave the landfill safe enough for human habitation of a residential nature.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | August 9, 2007
About 10 visitors last week gathered around a table at the AES Huntington Beach power plant, strapped on hard hats and safety glasses, and looked at nearly every corner of the facility. Such tours happen regularly, but rarely was the audience quite like this one. The 10 who showed up were members of Residents for Responsible Desalination, opponents of a proposed water desalination plant on the property who often clash with AES officials. Most tours include Junior Lifeguards and school children, said human resources and administrative assistant Megan Wooley.
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