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NEWS
By Michael Thomas | May 25, 2011
You published a letter from Lynn Beasley who writes as if only she knows the facts about the Orange County Humane Society on Newland Street in Huntington Beach ( "Concerns about H.B.'s animal shelter," May 12). Let me be very clear, I do not have any ax to grind with the person, only her misinformation. Her letter centers on a $7,000 monthly payment that goes to the shelter. Her statement is that it goes to Dr. Samir Botros. How far from truth are her facts? This fee, whatever it is, goes to the shelter.
NEWS
May 11, 2011
Newport Beach Animal Control has contracted with the Orange County Humane Society shelter on Newland Street in Huntington Beach ( "Newport OKs contract to use shelter," April 28). With an already overcrowded shelter with Costa Mesa's and Westminster's unwanted dogs and cats, the Orange County Humane Society will likely be stepping up its kill rate. Apparently, Newport Beach's animals will be getting preferential treatment, with allocated cages and kennels, I believe. They have offered Samir Botros, the shelter's owner, $7,000 a month to secure their animals.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | April 26, 2011
Stray pets from Newport Beach will soon be found in Huntington Beach, now that the Newport Beach City Council approved a contract for a new animal shelter Tuesday. The Orange County Humane Society, a privately run facility on Newland Street, was approved unanimously among a number of proposals from nearby shelters. "I was impressed with the services they provide there," said Councilman Steve Rosansky, who co-hosts a public access television show that advertises animals up for adoption and recently visited OCHS.
NEWS
December 16, 2004
I'm responding to the concerns about the animal shelter, which I do not believe are warranted. I used to be a volunteer there and I saw no wrong-doing on the part of the shelter or its employees. And so am in favor of continuing the shelter in Huntington Beach. JENNIFER GARDELLE Huntington Beach The animal shelter on Newland Street is a wonderful place to go and volunteer. I went there one day. You have to be there to know how animals are. I think the city or maybe a contractor should come in and maybe build a new one. The staff there is very wonderful and caring and the volunteer lady is a very nice lady.
NEWS
December 21, 2000
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- Instead of collecting toys for needy children this holiday season, Adrienne Parks wants to help homeless canines. Parks, who has lived in Surf City for 11 years, has adopted an animal shelter and hopes to raise funds and collect squeakers, chew bones and other playthings for stray dogs. "This time of year there are so many people out there trying to help others who have no place to go," she said. "I just wondered about the dogs, cats and other pets that are also out on the street."
NEWS
March 30, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH --A newly formed resident group wants the city to build an animal shelter that does not kill its captives. As long as the homeless pets are healthy, the shelter should keep them alive until they're adopted instead of the usual practice of putting them to sleep, said resident Karen Chepeka, president of Save Our Strays, a 10-member group formed in October. "There are too many people who think that animals are disposable property," she said.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | November 7, 2007
The long and heated debate over a proposed mandatory spay, neuter and microchipping ordinance in Huntington Beach moved toward compromise at this week’s City Council meeting by swapping incentives for requirements. By the time they finally voted after midnight Tuesday, visibly tired council members said they couldn’t answer all the questions that night. But they came up with a broad set of principles, most of which they unanimously approved. City staff will hammer those guidelines into an ordinance for discussion Dec. 17. The council is expected to set the new costs of dog and cat licenses then as well.
NEWS
October 5, 2000
We as a people care for animals. When birds were injured in the big oil spill off the coast of Huntington Beach in 1990, people turned out in droves to help. When the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center had to close this summer because it couldn't afford to pave its parking lot, so many people pitched in that the care center was able to reopen within a week. The people in this city care so deeply for their animals that Huntington Beach has an off-leash dog park, a dog beach and even a restaurant that caters to dogs.
NEWS
By: Barbara Diamond | September 16, 2005
Two Laguna Beach animal lovers headed east Monday in a U-Haul truck loaded with donated pet supplies and food. Laguna Beach Senior Animal Control Officer Joy Falk and Critter Catchers owner Brynne Van Putten will spend two weeks helping to rescue and care for animals left stranded by Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Their trip is fueled by donations and personal sacrifice. Van Putten has closed her business of capturing and relocating wild animals and caring for domestic pets for the duration of the rescue mission.
NEWS
May 25, 2011
The Orange County Humane Society would like to address some of the concerns raised by Lynn Beasley in the Independent ( "Concerns about H.B.'s animal shelter," May 12). The OCHS remains a pro-humane shelter, only euthanizing animals if they are terminally ill, aggressive or medically untreatable. Animals are not put down due to length of stay or space issues. We are committed to finding homes for stray and abandoned animals. Our new contract with Newport Beach will not affect our dedication to animals in trouble; in fact, the added resources allow us to expand our services while maintaining the high level of service residents and animals have come to expect from our shelter.
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NEWS
September 14, 2011
I wonder how many Newport Beach residents know about the changes being made or planned at the Newport Beach Police Department and how they will affect every resident. The police department is talking about picking up the arrestees from Costa Mesa. Costa Mesa arrests more people a night than there are beds in the Newport Beach jail. They also arrest a lot of homeless/transients every day. Those arrestees will be released from the Newport Beach jail and will either decide to hang out in Newport Beach or walk home to Costa Mesa, through Newport Beach neighborhoods.
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NEWS
May 25, 2011
The Orange County Humane Society would like to address some of the concerns raised by Lynn Beasley in the Independent ( "Concerns about H.B.'s animal shelter," May 12). The OCHS remains a pro-humane shelter, only euthanizing animals if they are terminally ill, aggressive or medically untreatable. Animals are not put down due to length of stay or space issues. We are committed to finding homes for stray and abandoned animals. Our new contract with Newport Beach will not affect our dedication to animals in trouble; in fact, the added resources allow us to expand our services while maintaining the high level of service residents and animals have come to expect from our shelter.
NEWS
By Michael Thomas | May 25, 2011
You published a letter from Lynn Beasley who writes as if only she knows the facts about the Orange County Humane Society on Newland Street in Huntington Beach ( "Concerns about H.B.'s animal shelter," May 12). Let me be very clear, I do not have any ax to grind with the person, only her misinformation. Her letter centers on a $7,000 monthly payment that goes to the shelter. Her statement is that it goes to Dr. Samir Botros. How far from truth are her facts? This fee, whatever it is, goes to the shelter.
NEWS
May 11, 2011
Newport Beach Animal Control has contracted with the Orange County Humane Society shelter on Newland Street in Huntington Beach ( "Newport OKs contract to use shelter," April 28). With an already overcrowded shelter with Costa Mesa's and Westminster's unwanted dogs and cats, the Orange County Humane Society will likely be stepping up its kill rate. Apparently, Newport Beach's animals will be getting preferential treatment, with allocated cages and kennels, I believe. They have offered Samir Botros, the shelter's owner, $7,000 a month to secure their animals.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | April 26, 2011
Stray pets from Newport Beach will soon be found in Huntington Beach, now that the Newport Beach City Council approved a contract for a new animal shelter Tuesday. The Orange County Humane Society, a privately run facility on Newland Street, was approved unanimously among a number of proposals from nearby shelters. "I was impressed with the services they provide there," said Councilman Steve Rosansky, who co-hosts a public access television show that advertises animals up for adoption and recently visited OCHS.
FEATURES
By Britney Barnes | April 14, 2010
Standing on the porch of the animal shelter, kindergartners Leah Weigand and Emilie Nagayama showed their enthusiasm for helping animals without homes. “Please adopt animals,” Leah chanted, as Emilie punctuated each sentence with a loud “yeah,” both of them jumping. The 6-year-old Huntington Beach residents gave up birthday presents this year and instead asked their friends to donate or buy gifts for the Animal Assistance League of Orange County, a nonprofit, no-kill shelter in Midway City.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | September 30, 2009
Sitting on a bench with a colorful box next to him, Ryan Lefmann waits for the newest member of his family — a cat. As Lefmann pulls the small white kitten from its box, the feline isn’t shy or frightened, but cuddles and immediately starts to climb onto Lefmann’s shoulder. “This guy, when we took him out, he really seemed to respond to us,” said the Laguna Hills resident. The yet-unnamed cat was a stray at the Orange County Animal Shelter, but now will be sharing a house with two dogs.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | November 7, 2007
The long and heated debate over a proposed mandatory spay, neuter and microchipping ordinance in Huntington Beach moved toward compromise at this week’s City Council meeting by swapping incentives for requirements. By the time they finally voted after midnight Tuesday, visibly tired council members said they couldn’t answer all the questions that night. But they came up with a broad set of principles, most of which they unanimously approved. City staff will hammer those guidelines into an ordinance for discussion Dec. 17. The council is expected to set the new costs of dog and cat licenses then as well.
NEWS
By: Barbara Diamond | September 16, 2005
Two Laguna Beach animal lovers headed east Monday in a U-Haul truck loaded with donated pet supplies and food. Laguna Beach Senior Animal Control Officer Joy Falk and Critter Catchers owner Brynne Van Putten will spend two weeks helping to rescue and care for animals left stranded by Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Their trip is fueled by donations and personal sacrifice. Van Putten has closed her business of capturing and relocating wild animals and caring for domestic pets for the duration of the rescue mission.
NEWS
December 16, 2004
I'm responding to the concerns about the animal shelter, which I do not believe are warranted. I used to be a volunteer there and I saw no wrong-doing on the part of the shelter or its employees. And so am in favor of continuing the shelter in Huntington Beach. JENNIFER GARDELLE Huntington Beach The animal shelter on Newland Street is a wonderful place to go and volunteer. I went there one day. You have to be there to know how animals are. I think the city or maybe a contractor should come in and maybe build a new one. The staff there is very wonderful and caring and the volunteer lady is a very nice lady.
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