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By Michael Alexander and Michael Miller | March 6, 2008
Local restaurants are crying foul at their inclusion on a state list of possible buyers of tainted beef, saying they don’t have any relation to the Chino slaughterhouse that recalled 143 million pounds of its meat. Several managers and owners say they know their distributors well and have never had a relation to the Hallmark/Westland Meat Packing Co. in Chino, directly or indirectly. They said they were indignant at their inclusion on such a list. Jon’s Coffee Shop manager Mike Dubrin said he’s had to post a letter from his meat distributor on the wall denying any relation to the slaughterhouse.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
DINING OUT Huckleberry's Famous Sandwiches, at Gothard Street and Edinger Avenue, is light, clean and convenient to Golden West College. No hassle here. On the corner of the L-shaped Huntington Plaza behind Coco's Bakery, it's an order-at-the-counter place owned by Suk Kim and his wife Sil with help form daughter Sharon, a Troy High School student and her two brothers. This is Suk Kim's second career. A graduate of the University of Southern California with a major in chemistry, he did research and development before retiring.
NEWS
October 17, 2002
DINING OUT A reader recently called about a great hot sandwich he'd had for lunch -- the best since leaving the East Coast. The sandwich: The Jersey Shore. The place: Where else -- Jersey Joe's Italian Deli on Olive Avenue in Huntington Beach. All you New Jerseyites will find a home in this small (five tables inside, three out), casual deli and recognize the familiar brands of the canned salsa and spaghetti sauces that fill the shelves in front of the order counter.
NEWS
December 5, 2002
DINING OUT Rico Cafe, a tiny, single storefront in a strip mall on the southeast corner of Hamilton Avenue and Bushard Street in Huntington Beach, is as unique in decor as it is in cuisine. Owned by Mariela Hadnot from Chile, it serves organically grown foods with no fertilizers, synthetic pesticides, herbicides or chemicals. Its salad greens practically stand alone, and its homemade focaccia bread sandwich is an inch thick, filled with carne asada (grilled beef)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | July 25, 2012
We were flabbergasted. We found ourselves eating possibly the best shrimp we had ever tasted. Caught in the wild, the shrimp were jumbo in size, incredibly tender, moist, juicy and tasting so fresh. We chose the shrimp with honey garlic from a selection of three preparations. The sauce was light and delicately sweet, with a hint of garlic that subtly enhanced the perfectly cooked crustaceans. A sprinkling of sesame seeds completed the dish. The florets of broccoli that came on the side were also as fresh as vegetables can be, with just the right touch of crunch.
NEWS
January 8, 2004
Mary Furr It's a frosty post-holiday day and the place we head for is the Westbay Cafe, which welcomes us with the busy comfort of home -- just to sit and collect ourselves is a pleasure here. Opened in 1996 by the Buettner brothers -- John, Scott, Brad and Jay -- it was a location they often talked about with their dad, Bud, as the perfect spot for a cafe. There's a big, color photo of the whole family on one wall of the bright and busy cafe with its pitched ceiling, beams and wraparound windows.
NEWS
November 1, 2001
Mary Furr It's rare to find a restaurant on the main street of a resort town that serves great Mediterranean food and rarer still, to find one that has a belly dancer with Saturday night dinner. But this is Huntington Beach, with a different take on resorts, and this is Coach's, that serves a spicy falafel as if it was a hamburger. Six years ago it was the Sunset Grill, but chef/owner Murat Koc (Coach) changed all that and now he has a menu of exotic Mideastern food -- home-style and hard to resist.
NEWS
January 15, 2004
Mary Furr If Huntington Beach has a landmark full-service restaurant, it is probably the Springdale Grille on Springdale Street just off Bolsa Avenue, where prime rib rules for the many "gentleman diners" who come from the nearby offices. Opened in 1969 by Gus Harris as La Brique, it dropped its fancy name and evolved into what it is today -- a great place to find Cook Smiley Galgini's prime rib and the quick and efficient attention of our server Lori Rode, whose watchful eye pays attention to your empty coffee cup. Gus' son, Nick, now has the Grille and has continued the restaurant with the same bon ami that greets you as you open the door on the bar and beyond to the dining room of comfortable vinyl booths, which offer privacy and relaxation for the conversation of engineers from nearby offices.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | July 25, 2012
We were flabbergasted. We found ourselves eating possibly the best shrimp we had ever tasted. Caught in the wild, the shrimp were jumbo in size, incredibly tender, moist, juicy and tasting so fresh. We chose the shrimp with honey garlic from a selection of three preparations. The sauce was light and delicately sweet, with a hint of garlic that subtly enhanced the perfectly cooked crustaceans. A sprinkling of sesame seeds completed the dish. The florets of broccoli that came on the side were also as fresh as vegetables can be, with just the right touch of crunch.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Reger | August 20, 2009
When I was first introduced to Pei Wei I was reluctant to visit. I knew they were a national chain and usually I am dubious about chain restaurants, especially one that stretches from coast to coast. The explosion of Pei Wei restaurants since 2001 has been pretty impressive. The offshoot of P.F. Chang?s, which was established as a more relaxed establishment, now has more than 150 locations. My friend Andre had raved about the restaurants and took me to the Newport Beach location.
FEATURES
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | February 18, 2009
Vic and I are not animal rights activists. You’ll never see us marching to free enslaved bovine Americans. Cows are delicious, and we enjoy eating them. But we have a beef with cattle. They’re flatulent. And that flatulence contributes to global warming in a major way. Here’s how cows work. They eat grass, which is loaded with cellulose. Mammals can’t digest cellulose, which is the fiber in our diets. Cows and other ungulates have solved this problem by hosting bacteria in their four-chambered stomachs.
NEWS
January 29, 2004
Andrew Edwards The Huntington Beach Union High School District proposes to add two new special education programs in hopes of keeping special needs students in district schools. The new programs, which would start in the fall, would be self-contained classes that would serve autistic students and students identified as being emotionally disturbed. If both programs are successfully put into place, the district may be able to attract students who are currently being educated in specialized private schools, said Irene White, director of the West Orange County Consortium for Special Education.
NEWS
January 15, 2004
Mary Furr If Huntington Beach has a landmark full-service restaurant, it is probably the Springdale Grille on Springdale Street just off Bolsa Avenue, where prime rib rules for the many "gentleman diners" who come from the nearby offices. Opened in 1969 by Gus Harris as La Brique, it dropped its fancy name and evolved into what it is today -- a great place to find Cook Smiley Galgini's prime rib and the quick and efficient attention of our server Lori Rode, whose watchful eye pays attention to your empty coffee cup. Gus' son, Nick, now has the Grille and has continued the restaurant with the same bon ami that greets you as you open the door on the bar and beyond to the dining room of comfortable vinyl booths, which offer privacy and relaxation for the conversation of engineers from nearby offices.
NEWS
January 8, 2004
Mary Furr It's a frosty post-holiday day and the place we head for is the Westbay Cafe, which welcomes us with the busy comfort of home -- just to sit and collect ourselves is a pleasure here. Opened in 1996 by the Buettner brothers -- John, Scott, Brad and Jay -- it was a location they often talked about with their dad, Bud, as the perfect spot for a cafe. There's a big, color photo of the whole family on one wall of the bright and busy cafe with its pitched ceiling, beams and wraparound windows.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
DINING OUT Huckleberry's Famous Sandwiches, at Gothard Street and Edinger Avenue, is light, clean and convenient to Golden West College. No hassle here. On the corner of the L-shaped Huntington Plaza behind Coco's Bakery, it's an order-at-the-counter place owned by Suk Kim and his wife Sil with help form daughter Sharon, a Troy High School student and her two brothers. This is Suk Kim's second career. A graduate of the University of Southern California with a major in chemistry, he did research and development before retiring.
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