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NEWS
February 3, 2005
Lauren Vane Students at Circle View School had the chance to meet the author behind some of their favorite books as the school presented Author's Day on Jan. 25, part of the Huntington Beach Public Library's Author's Festival. Sharon Sharth, "Mr. Mike" Snyder and Sara Van Dyke were who were picked by a parent committee to participate in Author's Day, reading from several of their books and talking to students about what it's like to be an author.
NEWS
March 7, 2002
Mike Sciacca Three students in Michelle Lopez's fifth-grade class at Sun View Elementary School sat at a round table and looked with interest -- yet some detachment -- at the prized possession placed before them. Each of the 10-year-olds briefly held the soft, round pink hand puppet, then passed it around before placing it at the center of the table. When Alex Siordia placed it on the table, she did so in a manner that forced the puppet to let out a strange noise.
FEATURES
December 10, 2009
Huntington Beach students brought in bags of pennies, spare change and dollars to raise nearly $2,000 for books for needy children around the country. Dr. Ralph E. Hawes Elementary School partnered with Scholastic for a One for Books program before the school’s Scholastic Book Fair. Students competed for 10 days to win a competition to be the classroom to donate the most money. Scholastic pledged to donate one book for every dollar the students donated, said Parent Teacher Assn.
FEATURES
By JAMES P. GRAY | January 23, 2009
In an earlier column we discussed one of the best ways for young people to expand their horizons and become more sophisticated in the world — and that is by reading. Improved reading skills will also, of course, increase their ability to do well in school, perform well on the SAT, and obtain and hold good jobs in the future. But, unfortunately, there are many young people who have still not learned or even been exposed to the joys and benefits of this wonderful pastime. Recently I spoke to a county librarian about this problem, and she told me that she had prepared a list of books for “resistant readers” with this in mind.
FEATURES
January 26, 2006
The Huntington Beach Independent asked third-graders at Hawes Elementary School, "What kind of books do you enjoy reading and why?" "I love books. I like reading "Series of Unfortunate Events" books because they're interesting and Harry Potter because it's kind of scary and I like scary things." Taylor Conner, 8, Huntington Beach "I like to read "Series of Unfortunate Events" because it's kind of scary and interesting." Shannon McCoy, 8, Huntington Beach "My favorite kind of books to read are novels like Harry Potter -- I've read all six books.
NEWS
By Chris Epting | August 25, 2010
"The Harlem 'Kings,' not the Globetrotters," he chuckles. "Sort of like the Globetrotters, definitely an entertaining team to play for, but I mean, at that point I'd play for anybody. " Huntington Beach-based professional basketball player Curtis W. Carter is recounting another of the offbeat teams he played for over the course of the last 10 years or so. He's crafted his odyssey into a series of books, the newest of which is called "The Road to the NBA, Volume 3. " "I played in Spain — all over Europe, in fact," he says, "and then all across the United States in minor leagues, independent leagues — you name it. " The now-journeyman hoopster had a dream as a kid growing up in Ohio, where he excelled in several sports.
NEWS
October 25, 2001
"Affect not as some do that bookish ambition to be stored with books and have well-furnished libraries, yet keep their heads empty of knowledge; to desire to have many books, and never to use them, is like a child that will have a candle burning by him all the while he is sleeping." -- Henry Peacham, "The Compleat Gentleman" Ah, books. What would we do without them? Hopefully, we'll never know. But one thing we do know is many of the young children who attend the financially struggling Oak View Elementary School unfortunately don't know how or have a hard time reading them.
FEATURES
By By Lindsay Sandham | January 26, 2006
To encourage students to read, Huntington Beach elementary schools bring writers and illustrators -- even canine book heroes -- into the classroom to discuss their work. With the modern-day distractions of big-screen televisions, video games, cell phones and Internet chat rooms, it is becoming more challenging for parents and teachers to encourage children to read books. To help remedy that situation, Huntington Beach elementary schools participate in the annual Authors Day as a way of introducing students to the people who write and illustrate the books we borrow from the library or buy in the stores.
NEWS
June 21, 2001
Torus Tammer What started in 1986 as a fund-raising event for the new children's wing of the Huntington Beach Library has evolved into an annual event. The Festival of Folktales, which took place Tuesday to kick off the library's summer reading club program was themed "Books and Beyond . . . Take me to your Reader." The event was sponsored by the Friends of the Children's Library. "The Festival of Folktales unofficially celebrates the beginning of summer," said Lyn Scott, president of the Friends of the Children's Library.
NEWS
January 16, 2003
Christine Carrillo First-, second- and third-grade students at John R. Peterson Elementary School in Huntington Beach rush to the school's Whale Tales room four days a week anxious to show off their reading prowess and get their hands on books, from the Berenstain Bears to Dr. Seuss. Keeping close tabs on how many books the students have read and how many more they need to read before reaching their individual goals, the school's six-year program has proven to be a positive experience for students, teachers and parents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | March 13, 2014
If someone asked Mary Urashima a decade ago about the history of the Wintersburg site in Huntington Beach, she probably wouldn't have had much to say. The public affairs consultant and former journalist has plenty to discuss now. She has spent seven years researching the effect the 4.4-acre site on Warner Avenue and Nichols Lane had on the city and Orange County. Much of her work is chronicled on her blog, historicwintersburg.blogspot. com, but she has also fixed her research in a more-permanent form with her first book, "Historic Wintersburg in Huntington Beach.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | March 12, 2014
Ill Repute's reputation has just gotten a boost. The Oxnard-based punk band, which has played on and off for three decades, earned a devoted following with hard-driving tunes like "Clean Cut American Kid. " But to find literature about the band, a listener might have to do some digging; Ill Repute's Wikipedia page contains just four paragraphs, while its AllMusic section features no biography or reviews (well, except for an unexplained three-star...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | March 4, 2014
Story time: Westminster Mall will host a family-friendly Book Blast from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday in its center court area. Kids will enjoy readings, giveaways and story-inspired activities. Families are invited to bring a new or gently used book to be donated to a local nonprofit. Information: (714) 898-2558 or http://www.simon.com/mall/westminster-mall . Bridal bliss: Scott's Restaurant & Bar, 3300 Bristol St., Costa Mesa, is hosting a bridal open house from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | December 31, 2013
When Jake Olson isn't playing football and golf for his high school, he's often offering inspiration or promoting his new book on his life. While all his activities would be a lot for an average 16-year-old to handle, Jake is blind. When people ask how can he possibly play golf without being able to see the ball, he credits his father with guiding him. But it seems apparent that his early experience playing sports as a person with sight and muscle memory - repeating behaviors over and over until they become second nature - have also enabled Jake to hit the ball, and quite well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | November 25, 2013
It seems to be Mark Twain season in Orange County. This month, Val Kilmer brought his one-man show "Citizen Twain" to the Laguna Playhouse, and a few weeks before that came the release of Jenny Lundquist's novel "The Princess in the Opal Mask," which reads like a female take on Twain's "The Prince and the Pauper. " Add a double "s" to the end of "Prince," and there you are. In Twain's story, a young prince and a beggar who closely resemble each other trade places, with the former learning about London squalor while the latter struggles to adapt to royal life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | September 25, 2013
The HB Reads program, which spotlights a book each year about tolerance and human rights, announced this week that it has chosen Terrence Roberts' "Lessons from Little Rock" as its selection for 2013-14. The nonfiction memoir, written by one of the black students who integrated an Arkansas high school in 1957 and became known as the "Little Rock Nine," is the seventh book spotlighted in the citywide program. "We're always looking for a message of diversity, and it seemed that this was a good one," said HB Reads founder and chairman Fred Provencher.
SPORTS
By Mike Sciacca | June 12, 2013
Joe Haakenson grew up a Los Angeles Dodgers fan. His allegiance was to Dodger Blue. At the time, he knew of but didn't closely follow that other Major League Baseball team one county away in Orange County. Now he knows plenty about that organization. Working as a writer with the Los Angeles News Group in the late 1980s, Haakenson ventured into rivalry territory when he took on the role of beat writer for the then-California Angels, a team that would later be known as the Anaheim Angels and then the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | June 12, 2013
This may be the year when Huntington Beach votes on what HB Reads. The organizers of the annual program, which encourages students and others to read a book with a diversity theme, have opened up the 2014 selection for public input. Between now and July 1, any member of the public can visit hbreads.org and nominate a book that's about 300 pages long, priced at $15 or less and appropriate for ages 15 and older. Of course, it's harder than that: Anyone submitting a title for consideration must also answer the question, "What makes this a book you cannot put down?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rhea Mahbubani | January 23, 2013
Linda Alexander favors an underdog. The 56-year-old Maryland author's intent is to give a fair shake to those who haven't been a staple of the public eye. Hence, the late Jack Kelly, who died in 1992, served her well as the protagonist of her latest book. "If you mentioned Jack Kelly, people would say, 'Who is he?'" Alexander said about the actor who played Bart, Bret Maverick's brother, on the TV series "Maverick," which aired between 1957 and 1962. "If you said, 'Maverick,' they would say, 'Oh yeah, James Garner.' But one was no more a star than the other.
NEWS
By Andrew Shortall | December 26, 2012
When Kieran Reynolds heard he was going to be reading "The Hunger Games" in his eighth-grade English class at Brethren Christian Junior and Senior School, he went to hunt for the book in his room. "My son read the whole series before it was even a class project, and he saw the movie," said Patricia Reynolds, Kieran's mom. "He loved it. " The book had a much more realistic feel in the second read, Kieran found. But the story become even more realistic. After finishing the novel with his English class, which is taught by Cara Cutruzzula, Kieran found himself as a character in the story Wednesday in Cutruzzula's first annual "Hunger Games.
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