Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HB Independent HomeCollectionsBrown Act
IN THE NEWS

Brown Act

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By: Alicia Robinson | August 4, 2005
Costa Mesa's city attorney has rejected a resident's claim that city officials violated the Brown Act by participating in private meetings concerning the city's Job Center. Martin Millard, a Costa Mesa resident who has said the city shouldn't be running the Job Center, sent the complaint to City Attorney Kimberly Hall Barlow on July 12. It alleged that members of the City Council and city staff have worked with an independent committee but withheld information about their involvement and the committee's work.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | February 2, 2011
Councilman Keith Bohr contacted four of seven city planning commissioners before they voted on an issue affecting a business, customers and residents in downtown Huntington Beach. His action has raised questions among some city officials on whether it violated open meeting laws, which prohibit the majority of an elected or appointed board from speaking privately, and without proper notice, about issues affecting the public. Bohr had a conversation with Planning Commission Chairwoman Barbara Delgleize and members Elizabeth Shier Burnett, Erik Peterson and Timothy Ryan — the majority of the commission — before they voted Jan. 25 on whether Bomburger Restaurant should be allowed to serve beer and wine.
NEWS
By: Dave Brooks | October 6, 2005
The city attorney has asked county prosecutors to look into allegations that a Huntington Beach planning commissioner violated the state's open meetings law. Bob Dingwall allegedly e-mailed research on an upcoming Target store project to six other commissioners on the planning body before going through the legal communication channels, City Attorney Jennifer McGrath said. The Brown Act makes it illegal for a majority of a government body -- often referred to as a quorum -- to meet privately to discuss current issues.
NEWS
September 18, 2003
Jenny Marder Mayor Connie Boardman asked Planning Commission Chair Randy Kokal to resign on Monday after watching her appointee make two crucial mistakes at last week's meeting. Kokal violated protocol, she said, when he allowed a new member to be elected vice chair of the commission rather than follow the group's bylaws, which require the rotation of seats to be based on seniority. The election of veteran Planning Commissioner Tom Livengood, who had just returned to serve on the board two weeks before, came moments after novice Commissioner John Scandura admitted to violating the Brown Act by privately contacting a majority of commissioners before the meeting.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
Internet nastiness invaded City Hall this week when a small contingency unsuccessfully demanded the resignation of Planning Commission Chairman Ron Davis. This whole ugly debate is a no-win situation because both sides are wrong. It begins with a group of community watchdog types having an online chat about how they think planning commissioners have violated the Brown Act by having individual meetings with staff members about various projects.
NEWS
January 31, 2002
Bryce Alderton With triplets on the way Pam Julien Houchen spends most of her day at home, but that is not stopping her from being an active participant in Huntington Beach's quest to find a new council member to fill the seat vacated by the resignation of Dave Garofalo last month. She was on the phone Monday listening in and voicing her thoughts during the first round of interviews and will participate via phone Friday, the next day of interviews.
NEWS
By Richard P. McKee | March 20, 2008
Three years after passage of Proposition 59, California?s ?Sunshine Initiative,? the public?s access to governmental information has greatly improved ? not! Passed unanimously by the state legislature, this constitutional amendment requires meetings and writings of governmental entities to be open to the public, and the courts to broadly interpret statutes to further the people?s right to access. However, today?s ugly truth is that secrecy within public agencies is being more strongly supported by the judiciary than ever before.
NEWS
December 7, 2000
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- A section of wetlands near the Waterfront Hilton Beach Resort will not become part of the hotel's expansion. The council voted 4 to 2 Monday, with Councilwomen Connie Boardman and Debbie Cook dissenting and Councilman Dave Garofalo absent, to publicly affirm a November decision made behind closed doors to preserve Little Shell from being part of the Robert Mayer Corp.'s expansion of the Waterfront Hilton. Mayer's plans are to build townhomes and duplexes on the wetlands near the hotel.
NEWS
September 23, 1999
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The City Council secretly authorized its outside attorney to settle a multimillion dollar lawsuit involving salary "spiking" by city employees. "The public doesn't know what's going on, and they have to pay the price," Councilman Dave Sullivan said. While a majority of the council gave its approval in July, Sullivan said he grew concerned after a meeting was held Sept. 10 to discuss a potential settlement in the case, which could cost taxpayers roughly $15 million.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
District was wrong to waive algebra I think it was not the right thing for the high school district to allow 40 seniors to graduate without passing algebra. Algebra is so simple. And I think that schools are short-changing our children. DOROTHY GILLESPIE Huntington Beach My recommendation is that if the school set the standard, we should keep the standard. If you don't follow that, then we are sending a conflicting message to the community.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | February 2, 2011
Councilman Keith Bohr contacted four of seven city planning commissioners before they voted on an issue affecting a business, customers and residents in downtown Huntington Beach. His action has raised questions among some city officials on whether it violated open meeting laws, which prohibit the majority of an elected or appointed board from speaking privately, and without proper notice, about issues affecting the public. Bohr had a conversation with Planning Commission Chairwoman Barbara Delgleize and members Elizabeth Shier Burnett, Erik Peterson and Timothy Ryan — the majority of the commission — before they voted Jan. 25 on whether Bomburger Restaurant should be allowed to serve beer and wine.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Richard P. McKee | March 20, 2008
Three years after passage of Proposition 59, California?s ?Sunshine Initiative,? the public?s access to governmental information has greatly improved ? not! Passed unanimously by the state legislature, this constitutional amendment requires meetings and writings of governmental entities to be open to the public, and the courts to broadly interpret statutes to further the people?s right to access. However, today?s ugly truth is that secrecy within public agencies is being more strongly supported by the judiciary than ever before.
NEWS
By: Dave Brooks | October 6, 2005
The city attorney has asked county prosecutors to look into allegations that a Huntington Beach planning commissioner violated the state's open meetings law. Bob Dingwall allegedly e-mailed research on an upcoming Target store project to six other commissioners on the planning body before going through the legal communication channels, City Attorney Jennifer McGrath said. The Brown Act makes it illegal for a majority of a government body -- often referred to as a quorum -- to meet privately to discuss current issues.
NEWS
By: Alicia Robinson | August 4, 2005
Costa Mesa's city attorney has rejected a resident's claim that city officials violated the Brown Act by participating in private meetings concerning the city's Job Center. Martin Millard, a Costa Mesa resident who has said the city shouldn't be running the Job Center, sent the complaint to City Attorney Kimberly Hall Barlow on July 12. It alleged that members of the City Council and city staff have worked with an independent committee but withheld information about their involvement and the committee's work.
NEWS
September 9, 2004
Andrew Edwards A contentious and complicated debate concluded Tuesday with the Ocean View School District's board voting to declare a 15-acre parcel of the Bolsa Chica wetlands surplus property, opening the door to a possible sale of the land. The board voted 3 to 1 after receiving a letter on Aug. 20 from Al Wright, executive director of the state's Wildlife Conservation Board, offering about $12.3 million per acre, board President Barbara Boskovich said.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
Internet nastiness invaded City Hall this week when a small contingency unsuccessfully demanded the resignation of Planning Commission Chairman Ron Davis. This whole ugly debate is a no-win situation because both sides are wrong. It begins with a group of community watchdog types having an online chat about how they think planning commissioners have violated the Brown Act by having individual meetings with staff members about various projects.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
District was wrong to waive algebra I think it was not the right thing for the high school district to allow 40 seniors to graduate without passing algebra. Algebra is so simple. And I think that schools are short-changing our children. DOROTHY GILLESPIE Huntington Beach My recommendation is that if the school set the standard, we should keep the standard. If you don't follow that, then we are sending a conflicting message to the community.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
Jenny Marder A reshuffled Planning Commission deadlocked on a vote for the proposed desalination plant Tuesday night and opted to pass the project on to the City Council without blessing or opposition. The project needed a vote from a majority of the seven-member commission to be approved, but with the resignation of former Chairman Randy Kokal and another commissioner on vacation, the vote stalled at 3 to 2 in favor of denying the project's remaining permits.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
Mayor right in resignation request I believe that the mayor acted appropriately by accepting the resignation from [Planning Commission Chair Randy] Kokal. It was clear that it is important that the Planning Commission follow the guidelines that it created. FLOSSIE HORGAN Huntington Beach I am so thankful to Mayor Connie Boardman for taking the steps she did to make sure our public officials follow the laws enacted to keep our government corruption free and open to the public.
NEWS
September 18, 2003
Jenny Marder Mayor Connie Boardman asked Planning Commission Chair Randy Kokal to resign on Monday after watching her appointee make two crucial mistakes at last week's meeting. Kokal violated protocol, she said, when he allowed a new member to be elected vice chair of the commission rather than follow the group's bylaws, which require the rotation of seats to be based on seniority. The election of veteran Planning Commissioner Tom Livengood, who had just returned to serve on the board two weeks before, came moments after novice Commissioner John Scandura admitted to violating the Brown Act by privately contacting a majority of commissioners before the meeting.
Huntington Beach Independent Articles Huntington Beach Independent Articles
|