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NEWS
This post has been corrected, as noted below. | August 26, 2013
The 15 members of the Huntington Beach Downtown Task Force were named Monday, a city spokeswoman said. The task force includes three City Council members, five downtown residents, four representatives of bars and restaurants, a retail business owner and one member each from Marketing and Visitor's Bureau, Business Improvement District and Chamber of Commerce, according to a statement by spokeswoman Laurie Frymire. The group is set to meet on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
Here are some of the items the City Council considered at its meeting Monday: Surf city nights funding Downtown farmers’ market and festival Surf City Nights has had its funding extended another year by the city. The council approved another $86,000 for Surf City Nights over the next year, paying for city workers who close roads and police the Tuesday event. The money also boosts Downtown Business Improvement District Executive Director Connie Pedenko’s salary to that of a full-time position, charging her with growing her organization and organizing the festival.
NEWS
September 4, 2003
WHAT HAPPENED: The council agreed to remove a parcel of city-owned land from a list of possible surplus property sales. WHAT IT MEANS: On Aug. 28, the City Council approved a list of city parcels to be sold as excess land. A parcel of undeveloped land next to Irby Park, at Marilyn Drive and Dale Vista Lane, was included on that list. Mayor Connie Boardman recommended Tuesday that the council remove the Irby Park parcel to be used as an urban runoff treatment site.
BUSINESS
By Michael Alexander | July 25, 2007
The well-attended Tuesday-night street festival Surf City Nights has made it past the trial phase, and downtown retailers and restaurants have begun to make the business-boosting event financially viable. But larger questions about the future shape of the festival — and of Main Street as a shopping district — remain. The last two weeks have seen major changes for Surf City Nights, with many long-sought improvements finally arriving. A new farmer's market for Surf City Nights does not charge event coordinators an up-front fee, cutting thousands of dollars from the event's price tag. Booths now stretch to a third block of Main Street, leaving the festival less crammed for space.
NEWS
August 19, 2004
Here are some of the items the council discussed Monday night: MOBILE HOME CONVERSION ORDINANCE Councilwoman Connie Boardman recommended the council delay a vote on a mobile home park law in order to give direction to City Atty. Jennifer McGrath on how to draft the ordinance dealing with the conversion of parks. Current law allows park owners to pay mobile home residents as little as $5,000 a piece if the park owner decides to sell the park or convert it to a different use. Boardman wants to introduce legislation that would require mobile home owners to be paid fair market value for their homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Alexander Independent | March 4, 2008
When Surf City Nights first came to Main Street in March 2007, it cost $8,000 a night, was expected to end after three months, and nobody knew if anyone would come. A year later, a much-tweaked festival has proven its worth, observers said. The one-year anniversary of the farmers’ market and street fair comes Tuesday night with a Mardi Gras theme and all the food and entertainment it normally offers, said Connie Pedenko, executive director of the Huntington Beach Downtown Business Improvement District.
NEWS
January 10, 2002
Bryce Alderton Much has changed in Downtown Huntington Beach since Akira Fukada first became manager at Jack's Surfboards six years ago. Much of it has been for the better, he said. "In the early '80s no one wanted to come down here because it was so run down," Fukada said. "Now there's Pier Plaza and the Ocean Promenade buildings. It has become a renowned spot, people come from all over the world." In an effort to keep the changes Downtown on a positive path the city is now considering creating a Business Improvement District in the Downtown area.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | July 12, 2013
Reallocating police funds to pay for a downtown video surveillance system, establishing a downtown task force and requiring new developments to include charging stations for electric vehicles are some of the topics set to be discussed at Monday's Huntington Beach City Council meeting. Downtown is a continuing concern for the council. Council members recently passed an ordinance that places stricter laws for new bars and restaurants in the area. Three items on the agenda aim to improve the district's living and business conditions.
BUSINESS
By Michael Alexander | March 5, 2008
Children lined up at an inflatable bounce house, crowds circled musicians playing guitar, and customers of all ages bought fresh strawberries and other fruits and vegetables from farmers’ market booths spanning three blocks of Main Street. Balloons arched over the street, and plenty of pedestrians were wearing Mardi Gras beads, part of the night’s theme. Yes, the scene could only have come from the popular weekly downtown street fair Surf City Nights. But there was little indication of a first anniversary.
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NEWS
This post has been corrected, as noted below. | August 26, 2013
The 15 members of the Huntington Beach Downtown Task Force were named Monday, a city spokeswoman said. The task force includes three City Council members, five downtown residents, four representatives of bars and restaurants, a retail business owner and one member each from Marketing and Visitor's Bureau, Business Improvement District and Chamber of Commerce, according to a statement by spokeswoman Laurie Frymire. The group is set to meet on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | July 12, 2013
Reallocating police funds to pay for a downtown video surveillance system, establishing a downtown task force and requiring new developments to include charging stations for electric vehicles are some of the topics set to be discussed at Monday's Huntington Beach City Council meeting. Downtown is a continuing concern for the council. Council members recently passed an ordinance that places stricter laws for new bars and restaurants in the area. Three items on the agenda aim to improve the district's living and business conditions.
BUSINESS
By Michael Alexander | March 5, 2008
Children lined up at an inflatable bounce house, crowds circled musicians playing guitar, and customers of all ages bought fresh strawberries and other fruits and vegetables from farmers’ market booths spanning three blocks of Main Street. Balloons arched over the street, and plenty of pedestrians were wearing Mardi Gras beads, part of the night’s theme. Yes, the scene could only have come from the popular weekly downtown street fair Surf City Nights. But there was little indication of a first anniversary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Alexander Independent | March 4, 2008
When Surf City Nights first came to Main Street in March 2007, it cost $8,000 a night, was expected to end after three months, and nobody knew if anyone would come. A year later, a much-tweaked festival has proven its worth, observers said. The one-year anniversary of the farmers’ market and street fair comes Tuesday night with a Mardi Gras theme and all the food and entertainment it normally offers, said Connie Pedenko, executive director of the Huntington Beach Downtown Business Improvement District.
NEWS
February 21, 2008
Here are some of the items the City Council considered at its meeting Tuesday. REFINANCING PUBLIC BONDS Council members voted unanimously to refinance some of the bonds it issued in 1997 and 2000 to make public improvements. City staff told them that with interest rates falling to new lows, the government could get a better deal on its debts. WHAT IT MEANS The city will save $700,000 off of the bonds? current value, finance officer Dan Villella said. ?Usually staff uses these meetings to come to you to request additional money,?
BUSINESS
By Michael Alexander | July 25, 2007
The well-attended Tuesday-night street festival Surf City Nights has made it past the trial phase, and downtown retailers and restaurants have begun to make the business-boosting event financially viable. But larger questions about the future shape of the festival — and of Main Street as a shopping district — remain. The last two weeks have seen major changes for Surf City Nights, with many long-sought improvements finally arriving. A new farmer's market for Surf City Nights does not charge event coordinators an up-front fee, cutting thousands of dollars from the event's price tag. Booths now stretch to a third block of Main Street, leaving the festival less crammed for space.
NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | May 11, 2006
A special committee plans to meet with City Council members today to discuss the challenges and benefits of closing Main Street to automobile traffic. A city entourage recently met with Santa Monica officials for a workshop and tour of that city's Third Street Promenade. A similar plan for Main Street has been in the pipeline for close to a decade. Key issues of closing Main Street are replacing on-street parking, additional costs of street cleaning and maintenance, and organizing concerts and street entertainers.
NEWS
August 19, 2004
Here are some of the items the council discussed Monday night: MOBILE HOME CONVERSION ORDINANCE Councilwoman Connie Boardman recommended the council delay a vote on a mobile home park law in order to give direction to City Atty. Jennifer McGrath on how to draft the ordinance dealing with the conversion of parks. Current law allows park owners to pay mobile home residents as little as $5,000 a piece if the park owner decides to sell the park or convert it to a different use. Boardman wants to introduce legislation that would require mobile home owners to be paid fair market value for their homes.
NEWS
September 4, 2003
WHAT HAPPENED: The council agreed to remove a parcel of city-owned land from a list of possible surplus property sales. WHAT IT MEANS: On Aug. 28, the City Council approved a list of city parcels to be sold as excess land. A parcel of undeveloped land next to Irby Park, at Marilyn Drive and Dale Vista Lane, was included on that list. Mayor Connie Boardman recommended Tuesday that the council remove the Irby Park parcel to be used as an urban runoff treatment site.
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