Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HB Independent HomeCollectionsCity Lights
IN THE NEWS

City Lights

RELATED KEYWORDS:
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | October 9, 2012
The journalist in me has tried to write a lede for this column, and the poet has fought him tooth and nail. Just how should I begin a piece about the closing of Lee Mallory's Orange County poetry readings? With wordplay? A personal anecdote? Should I even aim for prose, or, in the spirit of Lee, should I dispense with capitals and syntax and let the words flow as they will? Yes, I think that's the way to go. And rather than shoot for a feeble imitation, I'll let Lee write the start of this column himself.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Miller | October 3, 2012
Someday, if the situation arises, I hope I'll be like Galen Flynn. I may not know if I'm capable of it until the moment comes. Flynn, a Huntington Beach resident who lives a stone's throw from the pier, is not a brave man by trade. The 51-year-old makes tools for Boeing for a living and has no emergency training beyond a few CPR courses. With his long brown hair and sunglasses, he looks more like a beachcomber than a rescuer. Now, he's helped to save a life. And though he says, in retrospect, that he wouldn't have handled any part of the situation differently, he hardly went in with a coherent plan.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | September 26, 2012
A few years back, the Los Angeles Times wrote a moving story about the death of Britain's last-surviving army veteran of World War I. No, that's not a typo. The man's name was Harry Patch, and he passed away at the age of 111, breaking his country's last surviving link to the nearly century-old war. Reading the story, I was struck by how much of an everyman Patch seemed - and, given his unusual circumstances, how iconic he became in others' eyes. The former machine-gunner had been feted by governments and celebrated by England's poet laureate; when he died, the prime minister declared that the country was mourning "the passing of a great man. " To borrow a line from Shakespeare, some people are born great, others achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | September 19, 2012
So now I have done the moonwalk. Or something close to it, at least. Tuesday night, I joined a class at the Dance Asylum studio in Costa Mesa in which two dozen or so students learned the zombie choreography from Michael Jackson's "Thriller" video. No, that routine doesn't involve moonwalking. But before the class began, I cornered the instructor and asked if he knew the King of Pop's most famous step. It turned out he did. With our sides pointed at the full-length mirror, we slowly went through the routine together.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | September 11, 2012
There's a hilarious song by the Orange County folk singer Michael Ubaldini called "World Peace in 10 Easy Lessons," in which the narrator journeys from one potential guru to another in hopes of discovering the secret to a strife-free world. At one point on his quest, he listens to an actor on TV who ultimately disillusions him: "He said he wasn't racist; we must be colorblind / Then he talked of red and blue states, drew a dividing line. " Granted, separating people by the color of their state isn't as odious as separating them by the color of their skin.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | September 5, 2012
I'm glad to be here writing another article about Red Bucket Equine Rescue. The last time I did, I thought for a moment I was going to suffer death by horse. Not that it was the animal's fault - and certainly not Red Bucket's. The nonprofit, which operated until this summer at the Huntington Central Park Equestrian Center, has sheltered, fed and rehabilitated dozens of sick and abandoned horses. When I heard that the equestrian center had given Red Bucket a timeline to move out, I pulled for the horses to find a new home, and I was relieved when a new arrangement materialized in Chino Hills.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | August 27, 2012
This week, Times Community News lost a longtime member of its family. It was a member whom, to my knowledge, I never met in person. Such is the nature of email. Barbara Fischer, who for years contributed the Pet of the Week feature, died Wednesday after a long battle with cancer. Pet of the Week, which still runs in the Huntington Beach Independent, Daily Pilot and Coastline Pilot, spotlights an animal each week that is available for adoption. For years, week after week, I got used to receiving those emails from Barbara or one of her colleagues.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | August 22, 2012
The McKenna Claire Foundation has just taken another bold step toward fighting pediatric brain cancer, and now the words of Rex Hudler are stuck in my head again. Hudler, the former TV color commentator for the Angels, had a homespun phrase that he would whip out periodically: "Be a fountain, not a drain. " It's a simple enough creed to live by: Put out positive energy and don't cave in to cynicism. More often than not, it sounds doable. There are times in life, though, that make that fountain seem like a Herculean effort.
NEWS
August 21, 2012
I liked your article "'Just remember, it's mostly good'" (City Lights, Aug. 16). It did touch me. I caught the Colorado lead-in and thought…what in the world would this person have to say about that, but you took a tricky turn with the UCI candlelight vigil. And the part about "take a picture with a Sikh" was funny. We just spent a week traveling to Las Vegas, the Hoover Dam, the Grand Canyon and Sedona. Honestly, it is mostly good. Rebecca Gonzalez Newport Beach * Not this writer's cup of tea While many departments in the city may be reducing costs, I don't think they are asking their employees to pay out of pocket for their legitimate business expenses.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | August 10, 2012
Once in a while, you hear a simple statement that lodges itself permanently in your way of thinking. One of those, for me, came in a conversation I had with a high school friend who was savvy for his age on global politics. We had been talking about the usual headline-making woes: poverty, war, dictatorships and so on. At moments like that, it's often tempting to blurt out a defeated rhetorical question - why do we ever leave the house at all? What's the point of bringing children onto a planet like ours?
Huntington Beach Independent Articles Huntington Beach Independent Articles
|