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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | September 4, 2013
The comforting sounds of a fiddle banjo filled Huntington Beach Central Park on Saturday morning, but they were soon replaced with the noise of gunshots from black-powder rifles and the moans of dying men. The Huntington Beach Historical Society transformed the wooded area tucked behind the library into a Civil War battleground and campsite. More than 800 history buffs dressed in Union, Confederate or civilian clothing from the era congregated in the park for a weekend of reenactments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | August 27, 2008
Jennifer Mulvey has two uniforms. The one she wears most often has a collared shirt, arm patch and a shiny brass badge. But this weekend she will exchange it for a hoop skirt, corset and apron. Mulvey, a front desk officer at the Newport Beach Police Department, transforms into Mrs. Ealasiad “Elsie” Mulvey, an Irish servant at the Johnson Oak Inn, when she and the other members of the Historical Citizens Assn. attend Civil War reenactments throughout the region.
FEATURES
By Michael Alexander | May 27, 2008
Memorial Day is sometimes seen as the unofficial first three-day weekend of the summer, or at its most solemn, a time to only briefly remember fallen soldiers. But in years past, Huntington Beach was home to mass memorial events, both on the day and throughout the year. On the national holiday, which came into existence after the Civil War, veterans’ groups like the Grand Army of the Republic would make sure graves were decorated. They were busy other times of the year as well, making sure those who served and died were remembered.
FEATURES
By Michael Alexander | May 21, 2008
Memorial Day is sometimes seen as the unofficial first three-day weekend of the summer, or at its most solemn, a time to only briefly remember fallen soldiers. But in years past, Huntington Beach was home to mass memorial events, both on the day and throughout the year. On the national holiday, which came into existence after the Civil War, veterans’ groups like the Grand Army of the Republic would make sure graves were decorated. They were busy other times of the year as well, making sure those who served and died were remembered.
NEWS
July 5, 2001
Bryce Alderton The humidity, the clouds, and a new parade route -- these three variables made the 97th annual Huntington Beach Fourth of July Parade different from previous years, but patriotism, nostalgia and celebration still flowed on this Fourth of July. Parade-watchers of all ages were treated to 250 parade entries, including a Statue of Liberty float that captured the "Waves of Liberty" theme, members of Chapter 14 Pearl Harbor Survivors Association and Battery B, a Civil War reenactment group that tours Southern California.
NEWS
By Chris Epting | August 30, 2007
“I was looking at the field behind the Newland House and it was so nice and wide and empty. Then my friend, Carl Clink, who worked with me on the [Historical] Society said, ‘Maybe we could have a battle there.’” I’m speaking with 70-year old Maureen Rivers, a transplant from Lexington, Mass. She’s explaining to me, in her beautifully tinged New England accent, how when you grow up in war country (in her case, the Revolutionary War), the glory of recreated battles is just something in your blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | May 21, 2009
Deidre Haren is following in Jo March?s footsteps this fall. Haren, 21, who plays the tomboyish, literary lead in UC Irvine?s upcoming musical production of the classic 1869 Louisa May Alcott novel ?Little Women,? will go to New York City to pursue her dream of acting on Broadway. ?Little Women? tells the story of a family of four daughters ? Jo, sentimental Meg, sweet-but-frail Beth and grandiloquent Amy ? who cope, along with their mother, Marmee, while their father is away during the Civil War serving as a chaplain.
NEWS
By: | September 5, 2005
Big 'Little' Production "Little Women -- The Broadway Musical" opens at the Orange County Performing Arts Center on Tuesday at 8 p.m. Based on the novel by Louisa May Alcott, the production tells the story of four sisters at the end of the Civil War. The Orange County Performing Arts Center is at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa. For more information, call (714) 556-2787. Winged Migration Help our most delicate winged friends by volunteering to renovate the butterfly habitat at the Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve.
ENTERTAINMENT
By VAN NOVACK | October 11, 2007
Every few years Hollywood attempts, thus far without notable success, to revive the Western. Some of the revivals have been successful such as Clint Eastwood’s “Unforgiven,” which garnered the Academy Award for best picture and director in 1993. However, not even this venerable example enjoyed huge box-office success by today’s standards. The latest western offering is “3:10 to Yuma” starring Russell Crowe and Christian Bale in a remake of a 1957 film of the same name.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | September 4, 2013
The comforting sounds of a fiddle banjo filled Huntington Beach Central Park on Saturday morning, but they were soon replaced with the noise of gunshots from black-powder rifles and the moans of dying men. The Huntington Beach Historical Society transformed the wooded area tucked behind the library into a Civil War battleground and campsite. More than 800 history buffs dressed in Union, Confederate or civilian clothing from the era congregated in the park for a weekend of reenactments.
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NEWS
By Chris Epting | April 6, 2011
In a nondescript warehouse tucked in off Edinger Avenue near Gothard Street, there exists a mind-boggling, jaw-dropping, awe-inspiring collection. An emporium crammed with so many fascinating artifacts and dusty, musty, one-of-a-kind pieces of history that it's hard for the mind to process. No, you haven't just stepped into "The Twilight Zone. " It's Vintage Productions, and it's the sort of time-warp place that makes you feel as if you've climbed into one of the great attics on the planet.
NEWS
May 27, 2010
T here is a 94-line statement about Memorial Day outside Huntington Beach City Hall that says more than any editorial the Independent could ever write. That is the city's war memorial, which displays the names of 94 Huntington Beach residents who died in World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam and Iraq. The monument was dedicated May 26, 1997, and expanded later to include the Iraq casualties. It's doubtful those will be the last names ever added to it. When a major tragedy shakes American society — 9/11, the Challenger, Virginia Tech, Hurricane Katrina — there is always an acute period of mourning that lasts a few days or weeks.
NEWS
Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | May 27, 2010
T his coming Memorial Day weekend is a three-day holiday. What this often means for most of the country is that it's time to dust off the barbecue and get ready for summer cookouts. Since we have that beach party thing going on all year in our wonderful climate, Memorial Day weekend is not such a dramatic transition into summer for us. As we're sure you know, Memorial Day isn't a holiday that commemorates picnics. It's a holiday to commemorate our war dead. Many different communities lay claim to having established the holiday, and it likely had multiple origins as a nation began to heal and honor its fallen soldiers at the end of the Civil War. One version is that the holiday began May 1, 1865, as a celebration to honor the completion of reburial of Civil War dead in Charleston, S.C. Mostly black Union soldiers who had been interred in mass graves were unearthed and reburied individually.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | September 3, 2009
Every Labor Day Weekend in Huntington Beach?s Central Park, a massive cannon and other artillery are slowly wheeled into a grassy clearing. Women in voluminous skirts, with children in tow, gather on the sides of the field ? along with more incongruous spectators in Rainbow sandals and tank tops. The anticipation is palpable. All around the hushed clearing, kids eagerly point out troops in blue and gray, who stolidly make their way toward either end of the wide expanse. Following a shout or the sound of a trumpet, a thunderous ?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | May 21, 2009
Deidre Haren is following in Jo March?s footsteps this fall. Haren, 21, who plays the tomboyish, literary lead in UC Irvine?s upcoming musical production of the classic 1869 Louisa May Alcott novel ?Little Women,? will go to New York City to pursue her dream of acting on Broadway. ?Little Women? tells the story of a family of four daughters ? Jo, sentimental Meg, sweet-but-frail Beth and grandiloquent Amy ? who cope, along with their mother, Marmee, while their father is away during the Civil War serving as a chaplain.
NEWS
By Candice Baker | August 29, 2008
Jennifer Mulvey has two uniforms. The one she wears most often has a collared shirt, arm patch and a shiny brass badge. But this weekend she will exchange it for a hoop skirt, corset and apron. Mulvey, a front desk officer at the Newport Beach Police Department, transforms into Mrs. Ealasiad “Elsie” Mulvey, an Irish servant at the Johnson Oak Inn, when she and the other members of the Historical Citizens Assn. attend Civil War reenactments throughout the region.
NEWS
By Candice Baker | August 14, 2008
A boy on a boogie board was the last thing Nicholai Lidow expected to see when he paddled out from the coast of a remote, beleaguered African country. That young boarder became the inspiration for a film that has made waves at film festivals and resonated in viewers’ hearts: “Sliding Liberia.” The film, which will screen on Lido Isle tonight, was directed by Britton Caillouette, a Newport Beach native who graduated from Stanford University. “My good friend Nicholai from Stanford is a couple years older than me,” Caillouette said.
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