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Clean Water Act

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NEWS
September 27, 2001
The answer is the city has already spoken. [The city council] is unanimously against the waiver. The waiver allows 50% primary treatment of the effluent sewage to be dumped into the ocean. The Clean Water Act demands full secondary treatment of sewage. Full secondary removes 98% of the solids of the sewage before discharging it into the ocean. Secondary treatment also greatly reduces pathogens, which are bacteria and viruses, and enhances further processing to reclaim and reuse the resulting fresh water.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
Paul Clinton Orange County Sanitation District leaders have shifted their attention to the federal level in seeking legal protection from what could be stiff water-quality penalties as the district implements full treatment of its waste water. Following a two-track strategy, the district has deployed its Washington, D.C. lobbyist to investigate possible federal legislation, and it has begun talks with the Environmental Protection Agency on a settlement to an anticipated lawsuit.
NEWS
October 24, 2002
RACE FOR THE CITY COUNCIL Name: Joey Racano Age: 46 Occupation: Musician Family: Dog. Community activities: Clean water/wetlands activist. Education: Suffolk County Community College, Seldon campus. No degrees, just took prerequisites; turned out to be a blues singer. Favorite Leader: Bono, of the band U2. Contact Information: joeylittleshell@yahoo.com. RACANO ON: CITY COUNCIL DISTRICTS: Bad Idea. Districting is how councils can do bad things without being held politically accountable to voters.
NEWS
June 27, 2002
Paul Clinton State senators overwhelmingly endorsed Assemblyman Tom Harmon's bid to give the Orange County Sanitation District broader powers to treat urban runoff. The Senate passed the legislation, known as Assembly Bill 1892, on a 38-0 vote Monday. It now heads to Gov. Gray Davis' desk. Davis must sign it by Sept. 30. Harmon's bill would revise the district's charter, allowing the county agency to accept polluted runoff -- including animal and human waste, pesticides and other refuse washed down the county's storm drains -- at the Fountain Valley plant.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Paul Clinton The Orange County Sanitation District will not face onerous fines as long as it implements full treatment of its wastewater by 2013, under a bill signed into law by Gov. Gray Davis on Sunday. The legislation, known as Assembly Bill 1969, was introduced by Assemblyman Ken Maddox (R-Garden Grove) in February. Fellow Orange County Assemblyman Bill Campbell (R-Orange) added his name as a co-author during the summer. "So long as they meet that timeline, they'll be immune from penalty," Maddox said.
NEWS
February 28, 2002
Paul Clinton and Danette Goulet County sanitation district officials have announced they will begin disinfecting treated sewage that is released into the waters off Huntington Beach, waste that environmentalists have implicated as the cause of beach closings and illnesses among surfers and swimmers. The announcement came at a news conference last week at the Orange County Sanitation District's Fountain Valley plant. District leaders said they would spend $5 million per year to bleach the waste water, which is sent into the water through a pipe on the ocean floor.
NEWS
May 30, 2002
Paul Clinton City leaders are hopping mad about a federal bill that could give boaters the green light to dump partially treated sewage into Huntington Harbour. When told about the bill, introduced by Rep. Jim Saxton (R-N.J.) earlier this year, Mayor Debbie Cook said the proposal is absurd. "Has [Saxton] ever taken a swim by the harbor," Cook asked rhetorically. "Why would anybody support such a thing." Saxton's bill, introduced Feb. 5 and known as the Recreational Waters Protection Act, would amend the Clean Water Act to do two things: revise the standards for bacteria levels and allow boats equipped with a "marine sanitation device" to unload their waste in protected water bodies.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
Bryce Alderton Early on a Sunday morning this month, Randy Seton helped scoop tiny bits of sediment from the bottom of Huntington Harbour. He filtered out worms, crabs and shrimp, leaving just two to six centimeters of sand and water, which went into a jar to be inspected later. "I couldn't wait to see what was in the sifter," Seton said. Seton, program director for Orange County CoastKeepers, a nonprofit environmental organization, is in charge of organizing volunteers for a water-quality study of Huntington Harbour.
NEWS
June 6, 2002
Some ideas are slam-dunks. Some ideas are well-meant, but flawed. And then there are ideas such as the one being pitched by a New Jersey congressman to change the nation's long-standing Clean Water Act, ideas so misguided they would be laughable if they weren't so threatening. In this case, the threat is that the proposed legislation would allow boaters to dump partially treated sewage into Huntington Harbour. That's right. Right now, there is strong federal protection on the harbor's waters.
NEWS
April 10, 2002
Paul Clinton The State Water Resources Control Board wants to clean up a stretch of Huntington State Beach. The board added the shoreline -- from Newland Avenue to the Santa Ana River -- to a proposed list of impaired water bodies to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal list, the Impaired Water Bodies 303d List, was created by the Clean Water Act of 1972. It flags a polluted water body so it can be cleaned up. "Anything that would help maintain our beach waters would be fabulous," Councilwoman Pam Julien Houchen said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Marinka Horack | March 8, 2007
Your editorial and letters page of Feb. 22 shows that the Poseidon PR machine and its cohorts have been working overtime to influence public opinion. They are running scared of the Jan. 25 federal Second Circuit Court of Appeals decision that requires the EPA to be tougher in enforcing the Clean Water Act. It is not a sure thing that Poseidon will be built. In fact, Poseidon's only other large-scale desalination plant, in Tampa Bay, Fla., is still not operating, as was promised, after years of repairs.
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NEWS
February 24, 2005
VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY The first sign of trouble was the pair of mallards swimming in our front yard. The ducks thought our flooded front yard was a fine place to spend a rainy morning. When it rains as much as it did this past weekend, excess water flows from our little pond in front, across the driveway, and down a small drain that keeps storm water out of our garage. Well, usually the drain keeps water out of the garage. Not on Monday.
NEWS
October 24, 2002
RACE FOR THE CITY COUNCIL Name: Joey Racano Age: 46 Occupation: Musician Family: Dog. Community activities: Clean water/wetlands activist. Education: Suffolk County Community College, Seldon campus. No degrees, just took prerequisites; turned out to be a blues singer. Favorite Leader: Bono, of the band U2. Contact Information: joeylittleshell@yahoo.com. RACANO ON: CITY COUNCIL DISTRICTS: Bad Idea. Districting is how councils can do bad things without being held politically accountable to voters.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
Paul Clinton Orange County Sanitation District leaders have shifted their attention to the federal level in seeking legal protection from what could be stiff water-quality penalties as the district implements full treatment of its waste water. Following a two-track strategy, the district has deployed its Washington, D.C. lobbyist to investigate possible federal legislation, and it has begun talks with the Environmental Protection Agency on a settlement to an anticipated lawsuit.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Paul Clinton The Orange County Sanitation District's 25-member board has come under fire from one of its own members for a meeting held last week that may have violated the state's open-meeting laws. Mayor Debbie Cook stormed out of the meeting, held at the district's Fountain Valley offices on Sept. 26, and later criticized it as illegal. Cook, an attorney who specialized in environmental law before she was elected to the City Council in 2000, said the district inappropriately discussed a public issue by shielding itself with an exception in state law that allows agencies to discuss legal strategy behind closed doors.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Paul Clinton The Orange County Sanitation District will not face onerous fines as long as it implements full treatment of its wastewater by 2013, under a bill signed into law by Gov. Gray Davis on Sunday. The legislation, known as Assembly Bill 1969, was introduced by Assemblyman Ken Maddox (R-Garden Grove) in February. Fellow Orange County Assemblyman Bill Campbell (R-Orange) added his name as a co-author during the summer. "So long as they meet that timeline, they'll be immune from penalty," Maddox said.
NEWS
June 27, 2002
Don McGee The misuse of an ever-depleting resource seems to be at the crux of several ongoing sagas here in Surf City. Money is evaporating almost as quickly as water here in California. The state is expecting a $24-billion shortfall in the future and thus Huntington Beach will feel the fallout from this catastrophic occurrence. Programs that have been financed in the past are suddenly being considered for cutbacks or complete elimination. Yet we seem to find funds ($45,000)
NEWS
June 27, 2002
Paul Clinton State senators overwhelmingly endorsed Assemblyman Tom Harmon's bid to give the Orange County Sanitation District broader powers to treat urban runoff. The Senate passed the legislation, known as Assembly Bill 1892, on a 38-0 vote Monday. It now heads to Gov. Gray Davis' desk. Davis must sign it by Sept. 30. Harmon's bill would revise the district's charter, allowing the county agency to accept polluted runoff -- including animal and human waste, pesticides and other refuse washed down the county's storm drains -- at the Fountain Valley plant.
NEWS
June 6, 2002
WHAT HAPPENED: The City Council handed out $150,000 in grants to improve the city's baseball diamonds, a high school pool and a pair of deteriorating tennis courts. WHAT IT MEANS: The council approved a slate of 10 grants to act as seed money for projects around town. Each grant is given to a group as a portion of the total project budget. After a handful of council members objected to the process under which the package of grants appeared on the agenda, a majority approved them.
NEWS
June 6, 2002
Some ideas are slam-dunks. Some ideas are well-meant, but flawed. And then there are ideas such as the one being pitched by a New Jersey congressman to change the nation's long-standing Clean Water Act, ideas so misguided they would be laughable if they weren't so threatening. In this case, the threat is that the proposed legislation would allow boaters to dump partially treated sewage into Huntington Harbour. That's right. Right now, there is strong federal protection on the harbor's waters.
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