Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HB Independent HomeCollectionsComputer
IN THE NEWS

Computer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 13, 2013
The Orange County Sheriff's Department bomb squad has determined that a device found at a Huntington Beach gas station Saturday was harmless. The item was identified as a computer tower with no explosive capabilities, according to Sgt. Randall Sterett, of the bomb squad. “There's nothing illegal with it,” he said. “It was just suspicious that a computer tower was placed next to a pump. It's not something you would normally see.” Around 4:35 p.m., local police were notified that an object was placed against a gas pump at the Chevron station at Beach Boulevard and Ellis Avenue by a person driving a box truck, Huntington Beach police Lt. John Domingo said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Depko | October 1, 2008
“Eagle Eye” shamelessly borrows elements from many successful action movies. “Mission Impossible,” “The Bourne Identity” and “Indiana Jones” are just a few. But its driving character is a government super computer that develops a mind of its own and tries to take over Homeland Security operations. This computer gone bad plot is right out of Stanley Kubrick’s groundbreaking “2001.” The disturbed HAL 2000 computer of that movie has been replaced with a female-voiced machine in “Eagle Eye.” She can control all things electronic.
NEWS
June 1, 2000
Kenneth Ma A computer virus destroyed some files containing photographs in the city's computer network last week and forced officials to shut down an internal e-mail system in order to remove it. Outlook Express, a Microsoft program that operates the city's e-mail and electronic calendaring systems, was shut down May 24 to trap and remove the remains of the "I Love You" virus, which raced across the Internet in ...
FEATURES
January 11, 2007
  EDITOR'S NOTE: For a new Huntington Beach Independent feature, a reporter went to the Century 20 Bella Terra Theaters this week to get moviegoers' opinions of "Rocky Balboa," starring Sylvester Stallone, Burt Young, Milo Ventimiglia, Antonio Tarver and Geraldine Hughes.   Balboa, the former heavyweight champion, makes a comeback against a new rival after a computer-simulated match declares that he would defeat the reigning champ Mason "The Line" Dixon.
NEWS
December 2, 1999
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- While residents celebrate New Year's Eve, city officials will be making sure no Y2K glitches spoil the fun. Officials don't expect any major problems, but they will be ready if a computer malfunction causes a "low-level" crisis, said Gloria Morrison, the city's emergency services coordinator. Among the types of services that may suffer disruptions are electricity, water and gas. If a problem occurs, the city will coordinate with other government agencies and utility companies to restore service as quickly as possible, officials said.
NEWS
October 16, 2003
Mike Swanson Fifth-graders in Sharon Weitz's class at Seacliff Elementary School spent Tuesday morning learning the ropes of power-point presentations and onomatopoeic writing. Manned with 23 laptop computers, students started their morning by getting acquainted with the newly acquired machines and dealing with some of their more basic functions as preparation for a power-point presentation to be given later this year. Students were asked to fire up the machines, open Word and start a recently handwritten Halloween project.
NEWS
December 16, 1999
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- While residents celebrate New Year's Eve, city officials will be making sure no Y2K glitches spoil the fun. Officials don't expect any major problems, but they will be ready if a computer malfunction causes a "low-level" crisis, said Glorria Morrison, the city's emergency services coordinator. Electricity, water and gas are among the services that might suffer disruptions. If a problem occurs, the city will coordinate with other government agencies and utility companies to restore service as quickly as possible, officials said.
NEWS
June 19, 2003
A decision to merge computer systems and share technical support between five city departments to cut costs drew protests from library staff and residents who contend it needs its own specialized programs and attention. The City Council approved the plan to alter the city's information services department, which provides technological support to all city departments, 3 to 2 Monday night to shave about $1 million from the budget. Instead of having separate employees performing similar functions in different departments, a smaller team of technicians will be cross-trained to serve all departments from a central location.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK What a great idea. The city has decided to conduct a budget survey to find out what programs residents think should, or at least could, be cut in this time of fiscal crisis. And in true genius fashion, this survey won't be sent out to residents, so as to receive maximum input -- because we wouldn't want that. No, this survey, since its not on a terribly important topic, will be available online for the few residents who have heard about it and are interested.
NEWS
May 8, 2003
Coral Wilson When Lee Schiel graduated from Edison High in Huntington Beach in 1974, the school didn't even have computers. Now, 29 years after graduation, Schiel, 47, returned to show students his latest creation -- a supercomputer equipped with the software and hardware to convert CT scans and MRI data into high-resolution, 3-D maps. Schiel's technological breakthroughs could help doctors cure cancer and scientists solve the mystery of the dinosaurs' extinction.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jennifer Lane, Special to the Independent | February 12, 2014
Students use computers - and their imaginations - to bring to life pirates walking on ships, pumpkins talking, oranges getting bruised and balls bouncing in the ACME Animation class at Ethel Dwyer Middle School in Huntington Beach. The class, which is taught by Leroyce Hernandez, instructs beginning and advanced students on, of course, how to use computer software to make cartoons, but also on how to prepare for and execute a presentation, as well as give and receive feedback. "The best thing about the class is getting to work with partners, and seeing other people's animations is pretty awesome," said student Sapphire Brilliant, 13. One of her projects features an orange rolling off the top of a refrigerator and bouncing, causing the skin to bruise.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 10, 2014
Fountain Valley police are looking for a man believed to have stolen computers from a business in January. Seven Apple computers were removed last month from a business in the 17000 block of Newhope Street, and a man was seen driving away from the scene in a silver Ford Explorer or silver Nissan Pathfinder, police said. Anyone with information is encouraged to contact Det. David Steele at (714) 593-4465 or david.steele@fountainvalley.org . — Anthony Clark Carpio Twitter: @acocarpio
NEWS
August 13, 2013
The Orange County Sheriff's Department bomb squad has determined that a device found at a Huntington Beach gas station Saturday was harmless. The item was identified as a computer tower with no explosive capabilities, according to Sgt. Randall Sterett, of the bomb squad. “There's nothing illegal with it,” he said. “It was just suspicious that a computer tower was placed next to a pump. It's not something you would normally see.” Around 4:35 p.m., local police were notified that an object was placed against a gas pump at the Chevron station at Beach Boulevard and Ellis Avenue by a person driving a box truck, Huntington Beach police Lt. John Domingo said.
NEWS
October 20, 2010
Fountain Valley residents can get rid of their old electronics and documents safely at a free event Oct. 23. Residents can dispose of unwanted computers, televisions and other electronic items at the Fountain Valley E-waste Collection Event from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 23. There will also be a free paper shredding service from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and residents may bring up to two cardboard boxes to dispose of. The event will be in the...
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | July 8, 2010
Computers are in almost every classroom and many kids are comfortable on one before they know how to read, but that wasn't always the case. Huntington Beach senior Rich Kolander didn't grow up knowing how to send an e-mail, "poke" his friends on Facebook or create an Excel spreadsheet because his generation "wasn't born with the computer next to their crib," he said. "We grew up listening to the radio," he said. Kolander learned to use computers through his job as an engineer, but many seniors have never learned those skills, and it is for them that the Michael E. Rodgers Senior Center offers several classes on a variety of computer skills.
NEWS
June 23, 2010
The Huntington Beach Concours d'Elegance donated more than $12,400 to the city's Children's Library to replace outdated computers. The 25th annual car show raised funds to buy 13 new computers for children to use. The computers will replace 13 existing ones that are old and running down under constant wear and tear, said Mary-Pat Gonzalez, senior librarian in the children's department. "It's incredible. Our computers are so busy constantly…we are just so grateful to finally get reliable, operating computers," she said.
FEATURES
By Britney Barnes | October 29, 2009
As the event wrapped up and the last songs were being sung on karaoke, parents were wrapping up uneaten candies and cupcakes, and two little puppies being auctioned off that night had yet to get one bid — they would have to be returned. The puppies were being auctioned off for the Ethel R. Dwyer Middle School fall technology fundraiser. The fall auction was the kickoff of the PTSA fundraiser to replace outdated computers for the school, but it was looking pretty grim until the last minute.
NEWS
By Candice Baker | August 26, 2009
The Huntington Beach Adult School still has room available in its popular computing classes, following its computer center’s move to a new location on the Ocean View High School campus, 17071 Gothard St., Huntington Beach. The school has long been known as “Huntington Beach’s best-kept secret.” “But we can’t be anymore,” said computer instructor Tracy Foreman. “If we’re going to survive, we can’t be a secret.” The school is coping with new locations and budget cuts that have seen many of its programs chopped or modified.
LOCAL
February 11, 2009
A woman was seen slumped over a steering wheel and honking her horn at an undisclosed location, spraying something in her face, at 8:19 p.m. Saturday. It was discovered that the woman was huffing computer cleaner. The woman was treated and arrested.   AREA 1 Warner Avenue: A man asked police to talk to his stepson, who allegedly steals money from his mother’s purse and has a drug problem, on the 6500 block at 10:13 a.m. Sunday. Warner Avenue: It was discovered that someone entered a vacant apartment and turned on all the faucets, creating a flood of water several inches deep, on the 4600 block at 10:16 a.m. Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Depko | October 1, 2008
“Eagle Eye” shamelessly borrows elements from many successful action movies. “Mission Impossible,” “The Bourne Identity” and “Indiana Jones” are just a few. But its driving character is a government super computer that develops a mind of its own and tries to take over Homeland Security operations. This computer gone bad plot is right out of Stanley Kubrick’s groundbreaking “2001.” The disturbed HAL 2000 computer of that movie has been replaced with a female-voiced machine in “Eagle Eye.” She can control all things electronic.
Huntington Beach Independent Articles Huntington Beach Independent Articles
|