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Dave Sullivan

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NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | December 7, 2006
It's been a long 12 years on the council for Dave Sullivan. And as he began his last address as the mayor of Huntington Beach, it was only natural he got emotional and couldn't speak. After all, it's been said he cried when he saw a Huntington Beach resident spit on a Marine. He prefaced his "real speech" after a perfunctory state-of-the-city address with "it's a full moon today, so it will be a free fall." But when the time came to pass the gavel, Sullivan seemed relieved.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | October 17, 2012
He'd rather be playing senior softball. But at 75, Dave Sullivan says he instead wants to help Huntington Beach thrive, and it's why he's running for City Council for the fourth time. The more-than-four-decade resident is worried about the city's fiscal state and says his most important mission, should he be elected, is to help fix pensions. Though he spent 12 years on the council - from 1992 to 2000 and from 2002 to 2006 - Sullivan said he was always on the losing end when it came to pension spending.
NEWS
March 8, 2001
Hopefully, the state will provide funds to purchase the Bolsa Chica mesa ("Harman wants state to purchase Bolsa Chica mesa," Feb. 22). The mesa and wetlands are too important to lose to development. A mesa preservation plan would safeguard numerous threatened species and help to protect lowland wildlife as well. Assemblyman Tom Harman should be congratulated for taking action on this issue. The state Legislature should approve Harman's bill and send it to the governor for his signature in order to guarantee the future of the entire Bolsa Chica.
NEWS
August 17, 2000
-- Theresa Moreau HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The City Council is expected at its next regular meeting to take up the issue of City Atty. Gail Hutton's memo regarding the city's Conference & Visitors Bureau's possible contract with Mayor Dave Garofalo. Discussion will focus on whether to give the city attorney and city staff direction about whether there should be continued financial support to the visitor's bureau, which receives funding from the city, Councilman Dave Sullivan said.
NEWS
January 1, 2004
Dave Sullivan Regarding the Poseidon environmental report approval: I fear what I call the "Worst Of All Worlds Scenario": A desalination plant imposed on us without Huntington Beach having any control over the environmental review process and no tax increment money coming to the city. Unfortunately, if Huntington Beach opts out of the approval process one of the water boards can approve a desalination plant at the AES plant site on their own. Does anybody really think that the residents of Huntington Beach will have any meaningful input with a water board?
NEWS
April 19, 2001
Ron Davis' column ("We've seen the tax collector and it is us", April 12) comes to some faulty conclusions. I often agree with Ron, but not this time. In 1978, Proposition 13 froze property tax overrides, such as the city employee retirement levee. That means only the employee benefits in place on July 1, 1978, and any associated inflationary increases can be funded by the property tax. That's the law. However, taxes were collected to pay for new benefits added later.
NEWS
November 4, 1999
ORANGE COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS Hall of Administration, 10 Civic Center Plaza, Santa Ana, 92701. Chuck Smith, 1st Dist., Fountain Valley, 834-3110. Jim Silva, 2nd Dist., Costa Mesa and Huntington Beach, 834-3220. CITY OF FOUNTAIN VALLEY City Hall, 10200 Slater Ave., Fountain Valley, 92708, 593-4403. Mayor: John Collins. Council: Guy Carrozzo, Chuck Conlosh, Laurann Cook, Larry Crandall. CITY OF HUNTINGTON BEACH City Hall, 2000 Main St., Huntington Beach, 92648, 536-5553.
NEWS
May 2, 2002
Dave Sullivan It's interesting to look at how the city staff members handled the prevailing wage report requested by the City Council. Because the council did not allow the staff members to bury the issue in the black hole known as the Competitive Services Committee, they apparently decided to issue a quickie report and allow no time for public discussion. When government is working properly and cares about the input of its citizens, an important item like the prevailing wage report is available for at least two weeks for public review.
NEWS
November 30, 2006
Full disclosure. Dave Sullivan has long been a friend to this newspaper and the press in general. By that, we don't mean to suggest we were always lockstep in our views or that we didn't disagree. But even if we didn't see things the same way, Sullivan — the crusty Boston Irishman who this Monday night concludes a long and distinguished career as a councilman and mayor many times — always understood the importance of the press and our role as government watchdog. That's a rare trait for a public official.
NEWS
September 11, 2003
Dave Sullivan Huntington Beach employee union leader John Von Holle is a dedicated employee and a very nice guy, but he gets some of the facts wrong (Sounding Off, Sept. 4). He refers to critics of Huntington Beach employee benefits as "well-meaning but nevertheless uninformed." The truth is the critics are both well-meaning and well-informed. I will address several of the points on which I believe Von Holle is mistaken. "Why do so many Huntington Beach employees rank among the lowest paid public employees in the county?"
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia | October 17, 2012
He'd rather be playing senior softball. But at 75, Dave Sullivan says he instead wants to help Huntington Beach thrive, and it's why he's running for City Council for the fourth time. The more-than-four-decade resident is worried about the city's fiscal state and says his most important mission, should he be elected, is to help fix pensions. Though he spent 12 years on the council - from 1992 to 2000 and from 2002 to 2006 - Sullivan said he was always on the losing end when it came to pension spending.
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NEWS
November 3, 2010
Dave Sullivan's letter "Candidates not being totally honest on senior center" (Mailbag, Oct. 14) is full of misinformation. One example: "The city cannot afford to buy land for a senior center. If the city does not use a mere five voter-approved acres (a barren excavation site) out of the 356-acre Central Park, there will be no new senior center. " Wrong. The city already owns a whole city block already approved as a senior center at 17th Street and Orange Avenue. It could have leased one of the unused schools like Kettler for five years and moved the activities of the present senior center to the school site with doable modifications.
NEWS
October 8, 2008
On Tuesday at 7 p.m. at 2000 Main St. the Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on The Village at Bella Terra development proposal. The project proposes to change Huntington Beach’s General Plan and zoning for the vacant Montgomery Ward site to allow 538 to 713 high-rise residential units. Huntington Beach Tomorrow wants citizens to know that the project environmental impact report states there will be significant and unavoidable traffic problems on streets north of Warner Avenue, east of Goldenwest Street and on the 405 Freeway for decades to come with this proposed development.
NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | December 28, 2006
After 12 years of dominating city politics, Mayor Dave Sullivan leaves a legacy behind that can be matched only by a select few in the city. His decision to step away from the council dais in November surprised more than a few. Some were aghast. "There's no other reason other than I have been doing this for a long time and I take it very seriously," he said then of his decision. "I want the freedom to do other things." Mayor Gil Coerper succeeded him. Sullivan got involved in city politics in 1990 with Measure C, the ballot measure that gave Huntington Beach voters authority over development on parks and beaches if the projects exceeded a specific size and budget.
NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | December 7, 2006
It's been a long 12 years on the council for Dave Sullivan. And as he began his last address as the mayor of Huntington Beach, it was only natural he got emotional and couldn't speak. After all, it's been said he cried when he saw a Huntington Beach resident spit on a Marine. He prefaced his "real speech" after a perfunctory state-of-the-city address with "it's a full moon today, so it will be a free fall." But when the time came to pass the gavel, Sullivan seemed relieved.
NEWS
November 30, 2006
Full disclosure. Dave Sullivan has long been a friend to this newspaper and the press in general. By that, we don't mean to suggest we were always lockstep in our views or that we didn't disagree. But even if we didn't see things the same way, Sullivan — the crusty Boston Irishman who this Monday night concludes a long and distinguished career as a councilman and mayor many times — always understood the importance of the press and our role as government watchdog. That's a rare trait for a public official.
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