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LOCAL
By Michael Alexander | October 13, 2007
The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center reported a rash of sick or dead birds in Huntington Beach Thursday. No one knows what is killing them, but those still alive are semi-paralyzed, workers said. Sick or dead sanderlings and western snowy plovers started appearing at 9:45 a.m. Thursday, center volunteer Sharon Weeks said. As of 2 p.m. Wednesday, there were 23 living and four dead birds at the center, with numbers going up by the minute, she said. The plover is listed federally as a threatened species.
LOCAL
By Michael Alexander | October 11, 2007
The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center reported a rash of sick or dead birds in Huntington Beach Thursday. No one knows what is killing them, but those still alive are semi-paralyzed, workers said. Sick or dead sanderlings and western snowy plovers started appearing at 9:45 a.m. Thursday, center volunteer Sharon Weeks said. As of 2 p.m. Wednesday, there were 23 living and four dead birds at the center, with numbers going up by the minute, she said. The plover is listed federally as a threatened species.
LOCAL
By Alicia Robinson | February 22, 2007
It's still not clear what killed about 60 birds near the Santa Ana River mouth in Huntington Beach and Newport Beach, but animal care officials are narrowing down the culprit. Test results that came in this week from Antech Diagnostics in Irvine ruled out parasites, fungus and cancer, said Debbie McGuire of the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center, which handled the sick and dead birds. Earlier tests from USC's Caron Lab showed domoic acid, a toxin from red tide algae, is probably not causing the seizures, disorientation and death seen with most of the birds.
LOCAL
By Michael Alexander and Alicia Robinson | May 3, 2007
The death toll of birds, sea lions and other coastal animals that have been turning up poisoned on beaches throughout Southern California has slowed somewhat after a morbid week. But the danger to animals and people who eat local fish and shellfish may get worse again, officials said this week. As an algae bloom releasing the deadly toxin domoic acid moves south to San Diego, ocean currents may swirl it around right back to Huntington Beach, said Debbie McGuire, board president of the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center in Huntington Beach.
LOCAL
By Alicia Robinson | February 15, 2007
HUNTINGTON BEACH — Something is killing wild birds around coastal Orange County, and local animal care workers this week were trying to figure out what it is. Since Feb. 4, the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center has seen about 50 sea and shore birds at their Pacific Coast Highway facility, some dead and some having seizures. Most were found near the Santa Ana River mouth in Huntington Beach and Newport Beach, but one fell from the sky into someone's yard in Costa Mesa, center Wildlife Director Debbie McGuire said Monday.
NEWS
February 1, 2010
A Huntington Beach petroleum plant may be responsible for an oil spill late last month, the California Department of Fish and Game announced today. According to Carol Singleton, a spokeswoman for the department, officials were nearly certain the oil came from the Angus Petroleum Corporation at 1901 California St., but were running tests before taking any action. “We’re very sure,” she said. “But we have to be really thorough, so we’ve taken oil samples and we’re getting them processed through our petroleum chemistry lab. All indication is that it’s the Angus plant.
BUSINESS
By Michael Alexander | November 28, 2007
A glass wall decried by environmental groups for killing birds is not likely to come down altogether, said a senior vice president of the housing development that put it up. But the company intends to do a lot of experimenting to find a way short of that to fix the problem with the nearly mile-long structure meant to divide backyards from protected open space while still offering a view of nature, he said. “We certainly would be open to considering reasonable alternatives,” said Ed Mountford, senior vice president of Hearthside Homes, who put the wall on the border of its Brightwater development on the Bolsa Chica mesa in August.
NEWS
By Erik Holmes | March 31, 2010
Cleaning up a January oil spill in Huntington Beach cost Orange County about $1.5 million, but the county expects to be fully repaid. The Jan. 22 spill that released an estimated 672 gallons of oil into a flood control channel was quickly contained and did not reach surrounding wetlands or the ocean, but did contaminate 1.8 miles of the channel between Adams Avenue and Magnolia Street and about 0.3 miles of underground storm drains, according to...
NEWS
By CHRIS EPTING | November 29, 2007
Recently, I saw a magazine ad for the Brightwater housing development. The headline read, “Rolling waves. Coastal breezes. Native wetlands.” Perhaps now it should also include “Dead birds.” You may know that Brightwater is the complex taking shape on the mesa at the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve. For years, concerned environmentalists battled the development in defense of the wetlands. Though they (miraculously) succeeded in knocking down the 5,000-plus homes originally proposed for the area down to 356, many of the folks who fought the project still resent what is happening high on the hill.
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NEWS
By Erik Holmes | March 31, 2010
Cleaning up a January oil spill in Huntington Beach cost Orange County about $1.5 million, but the county expects to be fully repaid. The Jan. 22 spill that released an estimated 672 gallons of oil into a flood control channel was quickly contained and did not reach surrounding wetlands or the ocean, but did contaminate 1.8 miles of the channel between Adams Avenue and Magnolia Street and about 0.3 miles of underground storm drains, according to...
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NEWS
By Michael Miller | February 3, 2010
A Huntington Beach petroleum plant may be responsible for an oil spill late last month, according to state and federal officials. According to Carol Singleton, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Fish and Game, officials were nearly certain the oil came from the Angus Petroleum Corporation at 1901 California St., but were running tests before taking any action. “We’re very sure,” she said. “But we have to be really thorough, so we’ve taken oil samples and we’re getting them processed through our petroleum chemistry lab. All indication is that it’s the Angus plant.
NEWS
February 1, 2010
A Huntington Beach petroleum plant may be responsible for an oil spill late last month, the California Department of Fish and Game announced today. According to Carol Singleton, a spokeswoman for the department, officials were nearly certain the oil came from the Angus Petroleum Corporation at 1901 California St., but were running tests before taking any action. “We’re very sure,” she said. “But we have to be really thorough, so we’ve taken oil samples and we’re getting them processed through our petroleum chemistry lab. All indication is that it’s the Angus plant.
NEWS
By CHRIS EPTING | November 29, 2007
Recently, I saw a magazine ad for the Brightwater housing development. The headline read, “Rolling waves. Coastal breezes. Native wetlands.” Perhaps now it should also include “Dead birds.” You may know that Brightwater is the complex taking shape on the mesa at the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve. For years, concerned environmentalists battled the development in defense of the wetlands. Though they (miraculously) succeeded in knocking down the 5,000-plus homes originally proposed for the area down to 356, many of the folks who fought the project still resent what is happening high on the hill.
BUSINESS
By Michael Alexander | November 28, 2007
A glass wall decried by environmental groups for killing birds is not likely to come down altogether, said a senior vice president of the housing development that put it up. But the company intends to do a lot of experimenting to find a way short of that to fix the problem with the nearly mile-long structure meant to divide backyards from protected open space while still offering a view of nature, he said. “We certainly would be open to considering reasonable alternatives,” said Ed Mountford, senior vice president of Hearthside Homes, who put the wall on the border of its Brightwater development on the Bolsa Chica mesa in August.
LOCAL
By Michael Alexander | October 13, 2007
The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center reported a rash of sick or dead birds in Huntington Beach Thursday. No one knows what is killing them, but those still alive are semi-paralyzed, workers said. Sick or dead sanderlings and western snowy plovers started appearing at 9:45 a.m. Thursday, center volunteer Sharon Weeks said. As of 2 p.m. Wednesday, there were 23 living and four dead birds at the center, with numbers going up by the minute, she said. The plover is listed federally as a threatened species.
LOCAL
By Michael Alexander | October 11, 2007
The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center reported a rash of sick or dead birds in Huntington Beach Thursday. No one knows what is killing them, but those still alive are semi-paralyzed, workers said. Sick or dead sanderlings and western snowy plovers started appearing at 9:45 a.m. Thursday, center volunteer Sharon Weeks said. As of 2 p.m. Wednesday, there were 23 living and four dead birds at the center, with numbers going up by the minute, she said. The plover is listed federally as a threatened species.
LOCAL
By Michael Alexander and Alicia Robinson | May 3, 2007
The death toll of birds, sea lions and other coastal animals that have been turning up poisoned on beaches throughout Southern California has slowed somewhat after a morbid week. But the danger to animals and people who eat local fish and shellfish may get worse again, officials said this week. As an algae bloom releasing the deadly toxin domoic acid moves south to San Diego, ocean currents may swirl it around right back to Huntington Beach, said Debbie McGuire, board president of the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center in Huntington Beach.
LOCAL
By Alicia Robinson | February 22, 2007
It's still not clear what killed about 60 birds near the Santa Ana River mouth in Huntington Beach and Newport Beach, but animal care officials are narrowing down the culprit. Test results that came in this week from Antech Diagnostics in Irvine ruled out parasites, fungus and cancer, said Debbie McGuire of the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center, which handled the sick and dead birds. Earlier tests from USC's Caron Lab showed domoic acid, a toxin from red tide algae, is probably not causing the seizures, disorientation and death seen with most of the birds.
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