Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HB Independent HomeCollectionsEarthquake
IN THE NEWS

Earthquake

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
November 5, 2008
Thousands of students, residents and employees throughout the county will take part Nov. 13 in the Great Southern California Shake-Out, the largest earthquake preparedness drill in history. The event will simulate a response to a magnitude 7.8 earthquake on the south side of the San Andreas Fault, which experts say could kill hundreds and injure thousands. At 10:30 a.m., participants will “Drop, Cover and Hold On” while radio and television stations broadcast an emergency alert system.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | January 5, 2008
The City Council on Monday will discuss a multimillion-dollar retrofit of City Hall aimed at getting the aging building up to federal earthquake standards. Former City Administrator Penny Culbreth-Graft said last year that the floors of City Hall that house her office and those of the council members would “pancake” in a big enough earthquake. The council will be given several choices Monday on what to pay for, with costs ranging from $7,748,602 to $8,268,274. The more expensive options are mostly cosmetic, hiding bracing that would otherwise be in plain sight, according to city officials.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | July 29, 2008
A magnitude-5.4 earthquake that rocked Southern California caused little or no damage in Huntington Beach, local authorities said. The Chino Hills-centered temblor occurred at 11:42 a.m., according to a preliminary earthquake report from the Caltech Seismic Net website. Authorities said few emergency calls came in as a result. The earthquake, originally estimated at 5.8, was felt in Huntington Beach, approximately 25 miles from the epicenter. The quake was 7.6 miles deep. No injuries or property damage was reported in Huntington Beach as of 12:15 p.m., according to Battalion Chief David McBride of the Huntington Beach Fire Department.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | June 15, 2011
Seventh-graders at the Pegasus School in Huntington Beach ended the academic year with much more than lessons from textbooks. They gave less fortunate students in another country the gift of an education. The students spent the entire academic year working with a team of three other schools from around the country — Texas, Massachusetts and Hollywood — to raise funds and rebuild a school in Haiti, said Jim Conti, social studies teacher at Pegasus. Elie Dubois School in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, is one of many schools that were destroyed by last year's devastating earthquake.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | April 21, 2010
The big one hit Huntington Beach. There is chaos everywhere, people are hurt and dying, and there isn’t enough emergency personnel to go around — help isn’t going to come for at least 72 hours How are you going to survive? Survival was the name of the game at the Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) Disaster First Aid class Saturday. More than 100 citizens came out for the second of four training classes CERT offers a year. The program is a Federal Emergency Management Agency-endorsed training series created in Huntington Beach in 1991 to teach community members how to take care of themselves, their families and their neighbors until the authorities can get to them in the event of a major disaster, said Judy Ann Morris, CERT board president.
NEWS
By: STEVE SMITH | September 10, 2005
Hours after I suggested that an earthquake in our area could have the same type of aftermath as hurricane, the Los Angeles Times ran a couple of articles supporting this opinion. One of them compared the 1906 San Francisco earthquake with the effects of Hurricane Katrina and found many similarities: death and destruction, obviously, but also looting, mayhem and fires. The fires, in fact, were responsible for the widespread destruction of the city.
NEWS
January 8, 2004
Jenny Marder When Sharzhad Behzadpour thinks of Bam, she remembers the smell of orange blossoms in the spring. She remembers tangerine groves, the palm trees that lined the city's five main roads and the 2,000-year-old citadel. But Bam is no longer the city of her memories. Behzadpour, now a Huntington Beach resident, lost 180 family members in the earthquake that flattened the ancient Iranian city on Dec. 26. As many as 35,000 are believed to have died in the quake, which struck the city in Southeast Iran, measuring 6.7 on the Richter scale.
NEWS
August 26, 1999
Ellen McCarty FOUNTAIN VALLEY -- In many cultures, eclipses are believed to be omens of great change. Resident Dr. Colleen Fitzpatrick didn't realize how much the eclipse would shake up her recent visit to Turkey to view it, but she's thanking her lucky stars that she survived the Aug. 17 earthquake. Every few years, Fitzpatrick makes a pilgrimage to view an eclipse from its shadow edge, where the sun's border appears florescent pink, she said.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | June 16, 2010
Debbie Depin deals in first aid kits, emergency water pouches and solar blankets. Survival supplies are Depin's livelihood, but that doesn't stop her from giving them away. The longtime Huntington Beach resident partnered with Giving Children Hope — a nonprofit Christian organization in Buena Park that assists children locally and internationally — to donate survival kits, food and personal-hygiene items to Haiti and Chile after both countries were struck by powerful earthquakes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | January 9, 2013
Huntington Beach may not be anywhere near New Jersey, but it shares one potential danger — the coast. After witnessing the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy, Robinwood Church in Huntington Beach wants residents prepared for an earthquake or other disaster. Robinwood is hosting an earthquake and disaster presentation from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Jan. 12 at the church. The American Red Cross, the Orange County Fire Authority and Huntington Beach Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | June 15, 2011
Seventh-graders at the Pegasus School in Huntington Beach ended the academic year with much more than lessons from textbooks. They gave less fortunate students in another country the gift of an education. The students spent the entire academic year working with a team of three other schools from around the country — Texas, Massachusetts and Hollywood — to raise funds and rebuild a school in Haiti, said Jim Conti, social studies teacher at Pegasus. Elie Dubois School in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, is one of many schools that were destroyed by last year's devastating earthquake.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | June 16, 2010
Debbie Depin deals in first aid kits, emergency water pouches and solar blankets. Survival supplies are Depin's livelihood, but that doesn't stop her from giving them away. The longtime Huntington Beach resident partnered with Giving Children Hope — a nonprofit Christian organization in Buena Park that assists children locally and internationally — to donate survival kits, food and personal-hygiene items to Haiti and Chile after both countries were struck by powerful earthquakes.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | April 21, 2010
The big one hit Huntington Beach. There is chaos everywhere, people are hurt and dying, and there isn’t enough emergency personnel to go around — help isn’t going to come for at least 72 hours How are you going to survive? Survival was the name of the game at the Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) Disaster First Aid class Saturday. More than 100 citizens came out for the second of four training classes CERT offers a year. The program is a Federal Emergency Management Agency-endorsed training series created in Huntington Beach in 1991 to teach community members how to take care of themselves, their families and their neighbors until the authorities can get to them in the event of a major disaster, said Judy Ann Morris, CERT board president.
FEATURES
By Joseph Serna and Britney Barnes | January 21, 2010
A week after a devastating earthquake in Haiti killed countless people, aid from local Orange County groups is starting to make its way to the island. Huntington Beach will hold a fundraiser lunch at Zach’s at Pier Plaza from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, said Councilman Joe Carchio. Zach’s will serve a pasta lunch and take donations for Haiti. “Hopefully, we’ll raise the funds that we need to help in some small way to alleviate the pain,” Carchio said.
FEATURES
November 5, 2008
Thousands of students, residents and employees throughout the county will take part Nov. 13 in the Great Southern California Shake-Out, the largest earthquake preparedness drill in history. The event will simulate a response to a magnitude 7.8 earthquake on the south side of the San Andreas Fault, which experts say could kill hundreds and injure thousands. At 10:30 a.m., participants will “Drop, Cover and Hold On” while radio and television stations broadcast an emergency alert system.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | July 29, 2008
A magnitude-5.4 earthquake that rocked Southern California caused little or no damage in Huntington Beach, local authorities said. The Chino Hills-centered temblor occurred at 11:42 a.m., according to a preliminary earthquake report from the Caltech Seismic Net website. Authorities said few emergency calls came in as a result. The earthquake, originally estimated at 5.8, was felt in Huntington Beach, approximately 25 miles from the epicenter. The quake was 7.6 miles deep. No injuries or property damage was reported in Huntington Beach as of 12:15 p.m., according to Battalion Chief David McBride of the Huntington Beach Fire Department.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | April 3, 2008
Vic and I have a growing file of small items to talk about, so today we’re going to run through a few of them. First and most importantly, we read recently that the Mills Land and Water Company reportedly has been accused of grading, fencing and partially paving a delineated wetland area near the Cabrillo Mobile Home Park along Pacific Coast Highway between Beach Boulevard and Newland Street. If this is true, what were they thinking? Mills should know in fine detail what it can and cannot do. Years of litigation between Mills and public agencies over this land finally came to an end a couple of years ago with a comprehensive settlement.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | January 9, 2008
The City Council voted unanimously to save their own skins — almost literally. The council voted 7-0 Monday to accept a bid and choose a plan to shore up City Hall against earthquakes, as the building was not up to federal standards. They rejected a couple of cheaper alternatives that would have left a huge concrete wall and structural bracing visible to passersby. The roughly $8.2 million price was cheaper than the first round of bids the council rejected in August, which started at about $9.5 million.
Huntington Beach Independent Articles Huntington Beach Independent Articles
|