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Energy Crisis

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NEWS
April 19, 2001
Torus Tammer FOUNTAIN VALLEY -- Water and energy consultant Lon House visited the Orange County Municipal Water District last week to discuss the state's ongoing energy crisis and, specifically, its effect on water utilities. Meeting with the Water Advisory Committee of Orange County, House said he wanted to give local officials some background on the energy crisis and let them know what to expect. "We are looking at a long and uncomfortable summer with a lot of blackouts," he said.
NEWS
June 14, 2001
City's energy-saving measures good for taxpayers Many people feel the phrase "government innovation" is an oxymoron. A project approved by the Huntington Beach City Council last week proves this is not the case. The project is the powering of City Hall with microturbines using waste gas from the oil wells on City Hall property. While many businesses and public entities are coping with the energy crisis by going out and buying emergency diesel generators, the city of Huntington Beach has chosen a different but far more logical path.
NEWS
February 1, 2001
Angelique Flores HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The Public Utilities Commission relieved some of the costly burden for Golden West College with their recent waiver of penalty fees accrued by the power interruption program the college takes part in with the Southern California Edison Co. With the program suspended, fees are waived and the discount the school has been receiving is discontinued until further notice from the ...
NEWS
January 25, 2001
Tariq Malik California's energy crisis is hitting Huntington Beach hard -- particularly in the wallet. While the city has been trying to conserve energy by cutting back in numerous ways, it isn't enough. So far, the city has incurred about $835,000 in penalties for using power during interruption periods -- $500,000 alone in December. During this time, the city is expected to curtail its energy usage in return for lower electricity rates from Southern California Edison.
NEWS
February 1, 2001
Mika Sako, a concert pianist from Osaka, Japan, will perform at the Huntington Beach Central Library Theater at 3 p.m. Saturday. Tickets for the concert, sponsored by the Sister City Assn. of Huntington Beach and the Japan America Society, as well as Delta Air Lines and Kawai America Corp., are $15 for adults, $10 for senior citizens and $5 for students and children. Sato was a finalist in the 14th International Chopin Piano Competition, which is held every five years in Warsaw, Poland, and haw won numerous prizes in other piano competitions.
NEWS
By Alan Blank and Michael Alexander | July 18, 2008
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher just introduced a bill to Congress that would allow companies to erect large solar power plants without having to produce environmental impact studies, in order to expedite the approval process. The Bureau of Land Management, which oversees the necessary environmental studies, has a back log of 130 applications for large-scale solar operations, and has not issued a permit to date. “We’re in the middle of a crisis and the well-being of ordinary people is being damaged greatly by the price of energy,” Rohrabacher said.
NEWS
May 31, 2001
There's an energy crisis all right, but it may not be the one you're thinking of. We hear stories of power producers manipulating the market. They deliberately go offline to create a power deficit. Then they go back on line when prices go up. Meanwhile, electric bills will rise for about 60% to 70% of residential consumers. Most of us will suffer this summer from random power blackouts. But this isn't the worst part of the crisis. Of course, we're concerned about the rapidly escalating cost of energy and rapacious attempts by the energy producers to gouge us. But what concerns us more is that people might be so wedded to their life of energy consumption, and be so upset by the increase of a few dollars in their electric bills, that they'll start screaming for more power at a lower price without regard to environmental cost.
NEWS
By Alan Blank and Michael Alexander | July 23, 2008
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher just introduced a bill to Congress that would allow companies to erect large solar power plants without having to produce environmental impact studies, in order to expedite the approval process. The Bureau of Land Management, which oversees the necessary environmental studies, has a backlog of 130 applications for large-scale solar operations, and has not issued a permit to date. “We’re in the middle of a crisis, and the well-being of ordinary people is being damaged greatly by the price of energy,” Rohrabacher said.
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NEWS
By Alan Blank and Michael Alexander | July 23, 2008
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher just introduced a bill to Congress that would allow companies to erect large solar power plants without having to produce environmental impact studies, in order to expedite the approval process. The Bureau of Land Management, which oversees the necessary environmental studies, has a backlog of 130 applications for large-scale solar operations, and has not issued a permit to date. “We’re in the middle of a crisis, and the well-being of ordinary people is being damaged greatly by the price of energy,” Rohrabacher said.
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NEWS
By Alan Blank and Michael Alexander | July 18, 2008
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher just introduced a bill to Congress that would allow companies to erect large solar power plants without having to produce environmental impact studies, in order to expedite the approval process. The Bureau of Land Management, which oversees the necessary environmental studies, has a back log of 130 applications for large-scale solar operations, and has not issued a permit to date. “We’re in the middle of a crisis and the well-being of ordinary people is being damaged greatly by the price of energy,” Rohrabacher said.
NEWS
June 14, 2001
City's energy-saving measures good for taxpayers Many people feel the phrase "government innovation" is an oxymoron. A project approved by the Huntington Beach City Council last week proves this is not the case. The project is the powering of City Hall with microturbines using waste gas from the oil wells on City Hall property. While many businesses and public entities are coping with the energy crisis by going out and buying emergency diesel generators, the city of Huntington Beach has chosen a different but far more logical path.
NEWS
May 31, 2001
There's an energy crisis all right, but it may not be the one you're thinking of. We hear stories of power producers manipulating the market. They deliberately go offline to create a power deficit. Then they go back on line when prices go up. Meanwhile, electric bills will rise for about 60% to 70% of residential consumers. Most of us will suffer this summer from random power blackouts. But this isn't the worst part of the crisis. Of course, we're concerned about the rapidly escalating cost of energy and rapacious attempts by the energy producers to gouge us. But what concerns us more is that people might be so wedded to their life of energy consumption, and be so upset by the increase of a few dollars in their electric bills, that they'll start screaming for more power at a lower price without regard to environmental cost.
NEWS
April 19, 2001
Torus Tammer FOUNTAIN VALLEY -- Water and energy consultant Lon House visited the Orange County Municipal Water District last week to discuss the state's ongoing energy crisis and, specifically, its effect on water utilities. Meeting with the Water Advisory Committee of Orange County, House said he wanted to give local officials some background on the energy crisis and let them know what to expect. "We are looking at a long and uncomfortable summer with a lot of blackouts," he said.
NEWS
April 5, 2001
WHAT HAPPENED: The council agreed to terminate a local emergency in relation to the statewide energy crisis. WHAT IT MEANS: On Jan. 22, the city declared a local state of emergency to cut down on power costs. Then, the city had incurred about $835,000 in penalties for using power during interruption periods, when the city is supposed to curtail its energy use in return for lower power rates. City officials said that in the months since, statewide conditions have improved to the point that the emergency is no longer necessary.
NEWS
March 1, 2001
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- State energy officials took a personal look at AES Corp.'s plans to bring two silent energy generators online at its Surf City power plant, giving residents and city officials a forum to voice their concerns on the project. California State Energy commissioners Robert Pernell and Arthur Rosenfeld, joined by a number of commission staff, toured the site Feb. 21 with about 100 visitors. The two sit on the commission's Huntington Beach Power Plant Review Committee, which is studying the AES proposal.
NEWS
February 1, 2001
Mika Sako, a concert pianist from Osaka, Japan, will perform at the Huntington Beach Central Library Theater at 3 p.m. Saturday. Tickets for the concert, sponsored by the Sister City Assn. of Huntington Beach and the Japan America Society, as well as Delta Air Lines and Kawai America Corp., are $15 for adults, $10 for senior citizens and $5 for students and children. Sato was a finalist in the 14th International Chopin Piano Competition, which is held every five years in Warsaw, Poland, and haw won numerous prizes in other piano competitions.
NEWS
February 1, 2001
Angelique Flores HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The Public Utilities Commission relieved some of the costly burden for Golden West College with their recent waiver of penalty fees accrued by the power interruption program the college takes part in with the Southern California Edison Co. With the program suspended, fees are waived and the discount the school has been receiving is discontinued until further notice from the ...
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