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Environmental Report

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NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | April 20, 2011
The Huntington Beach City Council voted Monday to hire a firm to prepare an environmental report for a proposed skate park by Vans. The city is paying $222,900 for the report. The money, however, is being reimbursed upfront by Vans, which has proposed to build, maintain and run what it calls a world-class skate park. The city is paying PCR Services Corp., which is conducting the report, directly for the job to have oversight of the report and speed the process, said Scott Hess, director of planning and building.
NEWS
By: Dave Brooks | September 15, 2005
All eyes seem to be on City Councilman Don Hansen as the controversial Poseidon project heads toward round two at City Hall. One of the four yes votes that approved the desalination plant's environmental report, Hansen has been the target of anti-Poseidon groups angry over the council's Sept. 6 decision. In e-mail forums and online discussion groups, Hansen has been crowned the swing vote for the next public hearing. "He's put himself in a very precarious position," land activist Ed Kerins said.
NEWS
February 26, 2004
WHAT HAPPENED: Planning Commissioners denied a conditional use permit for dancing at the Inka Grill at 301 Main St. Commissioner Jan Shomaker was absent. WHAT IT MEANS: The commission denied a proposal to amend the restaurant's existing permit to allow dancing on a 123-square-foot dance floor. This would have gone along with live entertainment commissioner approved in May of 2001, which includes Latin jazz and Peruvian music, flamenco dance demonstrations and live bands, ranging from one to four performers.
NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | April 6, 2006
An environmental report released this week has angered residents near a proposed housing development in southeast Huntington Beach, who disagree with its key finding that their concerns over increased traffic are overstated. WL Direct Huntington Beach ? a partnership between builders JCC Homes and John Laing Homes ? plans to build 123 triplex and 81 duplex units at the site, which is bounded by Newland Street to the west, Lomond Drive to the south and Hamilton Avenue to the north.
NEWS
By: | September 15, 2005
Plenty is being read into the Huntington Beach City Council's narrow 4-3 decision to approve the environmental report for the Poseidon desalination plant. Some say it looks likely that the same majority will OK the final project later this fall. Others think the plan might get derailed, if not by the council then by the California Coastal Commission. All that will remain conjecture until the council's decision. What shouldn't happen now is for too much to be read into what already has happened.
NEWS
June 5, 2003
Jenny Marder The Planning Commission spent more than five hours Tuesday night groping for a decision on a controversial desalination plant, and after deadlocking, opted for the third time to postpone a decision, sending staff back to study a laundry list of concerns. As the early morning hours arrived, commissioners found themselves not only undecided on the project, but also muddled about their own role as a governing body. The desalination plant, slated to be built on 11 acres of land flanking AES Huntington Beach, would pull from the power plant's daily intake of ocean water to produce 50-million gallons a day of fresh drinking water.
NEWS
By: Annie Jelnick | September 15, 2005
The short answer to the question, "Did the City Council make the right decision on approving the Poseidon environmental report," is no. This is why. First and foremost, the environmental report still did not show with any degree of certitude what the long-term environmental implications are in running the plant. Given that in this city we have beach recreational use, a hospitality industry and marine life, it seems to me that for those reasons alone it should have been refused.
NEWS
By: | September 15, 2005
Effects of plant will linger for years After more than five hours of public testimony on the Poseidon environmental report, it was disappointing and shocking to witness the majority of the Huntington Beach City Council disregard the concerns in opposition to the report. Huntington Beach's largest tourist attraction and thus revenue generator is our beach. This ocean desalination plant is to be built in the exact location where the beach closures in Huntington Beach have taken place over the years.
NEWS
By: Dave Brooks | September 8, 2005
Supporters of the Poseidon desalination plant scored a major victory Tuesday night when the Huntington Beach City Council narrowly approved an environmental report on the project during a marathon meeting at City Hall. Just before 3:30 a.m., the council voted 4-3 to certify the environmental impact report on the proposed $250-million desalination facility to be built behind the AES plant on Pacific Coast Highway and Newland Street. The plant is said to be capable of creating 50 million gallons of drinking water per day from the sea. "This is by no means a done deal," Councilman Don Hansen said, arguing that the project must still go through a permitting process more rigorous than Tuesday's hearing.
NEWS
August 11, 2005
Dave Brooks Facing the first major policy test of his political career, City Councilman Don Hansen isn't giving any indication which way he'll go on a controversial desalination project proposed for southeast Huntington Beach. In recent weeks, a stream of reports have surfaced critical of an environmental analysis of a plan by Poseidon Resources to build a facility capable of producing 50 million gallons of drinking water per day. It is such concerns that will weigh on his decision whether to certify the group's environmental report at the council's Sept.
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia | January 25, 2012
Planning Commissioner Mark Bixby cast a vote Tuesday on the permit and environmental report for the Huntington Beach Senior Center, after learning through the city attorney that his vote might be challenged by some in the community. Bixby was not advised by the attorney not to vote on the matter. He was only told that some in the community had concerns that he may be biased about the subject. The commission voted 4-3 to approve an environmental impact report and a conditional-use permit for the center.
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | April 20, 2011
The Huntington Beach City Council voted Monday to hire a firm to prepare an environmental report for a proposed skate park by Vans. The city is paying $222,900 for the report. The money, however, is being reimbursed upfront by Vans, which has proposed to build, maintain and run what it calls a world-class skate park. The city is paying PCR Services Corp., which is conducting the report, directly for the job to have oversight of the report and speed the process, said Scott Hess, director of planning and building.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | December 15, 2010
An appeals court's recent ruling has given Huntington Beach the ability to build a $22-million senior center in Huntington Central Park, City Atty. Jennifer McGrath said. The court on Monday upheld an Orange County Superior Court judge's ruling that the city violated its general plan and a state environmental law by not adequately looking at alternative locations in its environmental impact report for the planned senior center. However, it overturned the judge's ruling that the city could not use funds from the stalled Pacific City project to build the center.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | August 11, 2010
A Huntington Beach grassroots organization that wants to limit growth downtown and the number of liquor licenses is moving forward with litigation against a project that will increase development, with a trial date this winter. The Huntington Beach Neighbors filed a lawsuit against the city in December claiming officials violated the California Environmental Quality Act by not adequately analyzing the impacts the Downtown Specific Plan will have on downtown residents. The lawsuit is scheduled to go to court Jan. 13. The Neighbors contend officials didn't complete a proper environmental impact report (EIR)
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | August 4, 2010
A Huntington Beach grassroots organization that wants to limit growth downtown and the number of liquor licenses is moving forward with litigation against a project that will increase development with a trial date this winter. The Huntington Beach Neighbors filed a lawsuit against the city in December claiming officials violated the California Environmental Quality Act by not adequately analyzing the impacts the Downtown Specific Plan will have on downtown residents. The lawsuit is scheduled to go to court Jan. 13. The Neighbors contend officials didn't complete a proper environmental impact report (EIR)
NEWS
December 4, 2009
A group of Huntington Beach residents filed a lawsuit against the city today alleging it broke state environmental laws by approving the Downtown Specific Plan’s Environmental Impact Report. A group of residents called the Huntington Beach Neighbors believe officials violated the California Environmental Quality Act by not adequately analyzing the impacts the plan will have on downtown residents. The plan is a long-range document that dictates building and parking specifications and design guidelines.
NEWS
By Alicia Robinson | November 30, 2006
Opponents of the proposed Poseidon seawater desalination plant said they'll continue to fight the project, despite a judge's ruling this week rejecting an environmental challenge. Orange County Superior Court Judge David C. Velasquez on Monday rejected a lawsuit the Sierra Club and the Surfrider Foundation filed against the city of Huntington Beach challenging the environmental report on the plant. The City Council approved the report in September 2005 and granted permits for the project in March.
NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | April 6, 2006
An environmental report released this week has angered residents near a proposed housing development in southeast Huntington Beach, who disagree with its key finding that their concerns over increased traffic are overstated. WL Direct Huntington Beach ? a partnership between builders JCC Homes and John Laing Homes ? plans to build 123 triplex and 81 duplex units at the site, which is bounded by Newland Street to the west, Lomond Drive to the south and Hamilton Avenue to the north.
NEWS
By: Annie Jelnick | September 15, 2005
The short answer to the question, "Did the City Council make the right decision on approving the Poseidon environmental report," is no. This is why. First and foremost, the environmental report still did not show with any degree of certitude what the long-term environmental implications are in running the plant. Given that in this city we have beach recreational use, a hospitality industry and marine life, it seems to me that for those reasons alone it should have been refused.
NEWS
By: | September 15, 2005
Plenty is being read into the Huntington Beach City Council's narrow 4-3 decision to approve the environmental report for the Poseidon desalination plant. Some say it looks likely that the same majority will OK the final project later this fall. Others think the plan might get derailed, if not by the council then by the California Coastal Commission. All that will remain conjecture until the council's decision. What shouldn't happen now is for too much to be read into what already has happened.
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