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NEWS
December 18, 2003
The Huntington Beach Independent went to Golden View Elementary School and asked fourth-graders, 'What's your favorite thing to do on the farm?' "I like feeding the goats and petting baby rabbits." JUSTIN CHARBONEAU, 9 "When I go and change the rabbit cages and I get to pet them and see the baby rabbits." JOSE ALEMAN, 10 "My favorite thing is coming out with my friends and feeding the goats and petting the rabbits." CLARISSA FLORES, 10 "My favorite thing to do at the farm is feeding the rabbits and touching the baby rabbits and feeding the goats, baby goats."
NEWS
February 24, 2005
Lauren Vane Once a week, fourth- and fifth-graders at Golden View School get a refreshing respite from their studies. They spend 45 minutes working on the school farm feeding the bunnies, tending the garden and raking the leaves. In the middle of Huntington Beach, the school's farm is two acres of hidden natural treasure. It is a working farm with a running stream, a garden and plenty of real, live farm animals. Golden View Principal Karan Spane said that the students benefit in many ways from having the farm just steps away from their classrooms.
NEWS
By JERRY PERSON | January 12, 2006
How many of you remember the names of those two radio characters from Pine Ridge, Ark.? If you remember the golden age of radio of the 1930s and '40s, you will remember those two lovable business partners, Lum and Abner, and their famous Jot 'Em Down store. Each week the characters, Lum Edwards and Abner Peabody, partners in Pine Ridge's General Store, would bring radio audiences some down-home humor as the partners serviced the needs of their fictional townspeople. The 1920s were a time of growth for Huntington Beach as oil was pumped out of the ground, refined and pumped back into the many cars in town.
NEWS
June 19, 2003
A LOOK BACK John A. Murdy Jr. once said, at the close of the school year it is natural that we look back over our past record, congratulate ourselves over brilliant victories, make excuses for defeats and prophesy for the future. The name Murdy is still familiar to us today in many ways. We have Murdy Park, Murdy Community Center, Murdy Circle and Murdy Fire Station. It all began with John's father, John A. Murdy Sr. who was a farmer in the Midwest when John Jr. was born in 1900 just east of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in the small farming community of Gettysburg, S.D. When John was 5 years old the family moved to California to live.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
A LOOK BACK I am amazed at how many people don't know that many of our streets are named for families who lived in Huntington Beach in the early days -- streets such as Talbert, Bushard, Graham, Edwards, Slater and Gothard. This week we will look at Heil, a name most people don't associate with a pioneer family of our area. Our story of the family begins when Lewis Heil loaded up his covered wagon in Texas in 1890 to begin a new life in California.
NEWS
December 25, 2003
JERRY PERSON Several kids these days know nothing of the hardships of past generations and how they had to make do with what they had. It wasn't unusual to recycle old furniture instead of going out to buy new pieces. Members of older generations had their furniture reupholstered to look new, and it would last for many more years. This week, we'll look at one of our past masters of the needle and thread. From 1949 through the 1980s, Huddleson's Upholstery was a mainstay in our town.
FEATURES
By Michael Miller | July 30, 2009
It may be a little fitting that I work for a newspaper, because, in a way, I’m the descendant of a classified ad. In the 19th century, my great-great-grandmother — recently widowed with a young son — answered a newspaper posting from a man who had bought 300 acres in California and was busy planting an orange grove. The man asked for a farm wife in the ad, and after she sent him her picture, he mailed her back a railroad ticket. Years later, Jan and Dean would describe California’s beach scene as “two girls for every boy,” but evidently, there was a time when a man literally had to advertise out of state for a woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | April 25, 2012
While Vic prepared for class one day last week, I transplanted some strawberry and bell pepper plants into one of my three raised garden beds. Then I watered my vegetable garden with a watering can, using stored rainwater from our rain barrels. I know that doesn't sound like much work, but it took me most of the morning. Done for the time being, I sat on my deck and looked out over my backyard, satisfied with what I saw. My vegetable beds are all planted for the season, my fruit trees are loaded with the promise of a record harvest, and all three hens are laying eggs again.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
JERRY PERSON In the early years of the Huntington Beach Historical Society, one of the society's traditions was the Old Acquaintance Tea, serving coffee and tea from a beautiful silver tea set. This silver set would be picked up by a member of the society from the home of Dwight and Fae Clapp at 944 11th Street. Most locals are familiar with Dwight's beach concession on our beach, run for many years by both of them. It was on a hot summer day in Los Angeles that Dwight Kenneth Clapp was born on Aug. 4, 1902.
NEWS
By VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY | October 4, 2007
Our past two columns—picking apples in Julian and buying a heritage turkey from a local farmer—have led up to today’s column. Vic and I cooked a dinner for friends last week, all from locally grown, fresh foods. Even the wines were local. We wanted to promote being healthy “locavores”—people who eat locally-grown, fresh, organic foods. Barbara Kingsolver’s, “Animal, Vegetable and Miracle,” has changed our lives. I read her book a couple of months after I had renewed my interest growing fruits and vegetables in my yard, and going to farmers’ markets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | August 5, 2013
For Gene Barbee, tending his plot at the Huntington Beach Community Garden requires a lot of the fine tuning and proper conditions he is used to applying to his elite automobile and motorcycle racers. The 69-year-old member of the Bonneville 200 MPG Club - membership means you have gone 200 mph on the 40-square-mile Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah - has been growing more than 10 types of fruits and vegetables for the past two years, including Brussels sprouts, tomatoes, asparagus, strawberries, pineapple and corn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | April 25, 2012
While Vic prepared for class one day last week, I transplanted some strawberry and bell pepper plants into one of my three raised garden beds. Then I watered my vegetable garden with a watering can, using stored rainwater from our rain barrels. I know that doesn't sound like much work, but it took me most of the morning. Done for the time being, I sat on my deck and looked out over my backyard, satisfied with what I saw. My vegetable beds are all planted for the season, my fruit trees are loaded with the promise of a record harvest, and all three hens are laying eggs again.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | August 3, 2011
Vic and I spent a fantastic day at the Orange County Fair this past Sunday. We went with our son Scott, his wife, Nicole, and their three preschoolers, Allison, Lauren and Megan. This was the girls' first visit to the O.C. Fair, although they've attended the San Diego County Fair at Del Mar in the past. We made Centennial Farm our first destination, because of the large variety of farm animals there. I asked the girls what they wanted to see most at the fair. "I want to see a pig's heinie," announced 5-year-old Lauren.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | November 24, 2010
Thanksgiving is upon us. Traditionally, this is a time to celebrate the season's harvest. In our yard, we grow fruit, vegetables and eggs. But unfortunately, our November garden is not providing Vic and me with the feast that we had hoped for this year. This time last year, I had just finished redoing the backyard. My three new raised beds were just beginning to produce. They were orderly and attractive. The coop was built, but the chickens weren't here yet. All was peaceful and beautiful in back.
FEATURES
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | November 26, 2009
Good eating to you this holiday What better time to talk about food than this national day of thanksgiving? Today is the day that people all over America feast on turkey, dressing, cranberries and pumpkin pie. Vegetables like yams, green beans and corn often accompany the feast. If the veggies are organic and locally grown, all the better. And that leads us into our topic of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). Basically, CSAs are programs of subscription farming. Customers sign up and pay in advance for a share of the produce.
FEATURES
By Michael Miller | July 30, 2009
It may be a little fitting that I work for a newspaper, because, in a way, I’m the descendant of a classified ad. In the 19th century, my great-great-grandmother — recently widowed with a young son — answered a newspaper posting from a man who had bought 300 acres in California and was busy planting an orange grove. The man asked for a farm wife in the ad, and after she sent him her picture, he mailed her back a railroad ticket. Years later, Jan and Dean would describe California’s beach scene as “two girls for every boy,” but evidently, there was a time when a man literally had to advertise out of state for a woman.
FEATURES
By Candice Baker | January 21, 2009
The kids at Golden View Elementary School are used to working with geese, sheep and goats. But this was another animal entirely. Although the school’s students help operate its small on-site farm and garden, they were treated to something new Tuesday, when Jackie the Cow made an appearance courtesy of the Dairy Council of California’s Mobile Dairy Classroom. As a cow’s udder is by far its most exciting element (at least to an elementary school student)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2008
With wine tasting for adults and face painting for the kids, a trip to Tom’s Farms ensures fun for the entire family. Tom’s Farms was originally a small market for fresh produce, but has since expanded to include a hamburger stand, wine and cheese shop, duck pond, country furniture store, and Mexican restaurant. Two magic shows run Saturday and Sunday, and a weekend petting zoo allows children to get close to animals such as potbellied pigs and rabbits.   GETTING THERE Take the 55 Freeway north for about 15 miles until the 91 Freeway.
FEATURES
By Michèle Marr | October 25, 2007
If you had to kill the cow yourself, would you still eat hamburgers? That was the question that dashed the big-money prospects of a contestant on Drew Carey’s “The Power of 10.” On the game show, players must guess how a certain segment of the American public has responded to a particular poll — give or take a few percentage points. One survey put the above question to a group of men. If we’re to believe the respondents, 79% said they would. Carey’s contestant guessed as few as 50% and not more than 70% and went home.
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