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NEWS
April 18, 2012
Ten nonprofits were selected Monday to sell safe and sane fireworks in Huntington Beach during the Fourth of July holiday. The organizations were randomly selected during the City Council meeting from among 33 that applied to sell fireworks as part of their fundraising efforts. A blindfolded Miss Huntington Beach Hana Smith helped the Fourth of July Board choose the nonprofits. The council in January lifted the longtime ban of selling fireworks in the city. It will be in effect for a two-year trial period.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
"Safe and sane" fireworks will be available for purchase at 10 stands around Huntington Beach. According to the city website, fireworks will be sold from July 1 to July 4. Hours are noon to 10 p.m. through July 3 and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on July 4. Ten nonprofits will sell the fireworks at the following locations: • Huntington Beach High School baseball team : 19640 Beach Blvd. at the Newland Center. • Goldenwest s wim team : 6967 Warner Ave. at Big Lots. • South Huntington Beach Girls Fastpitch : 21132 Beach Blvd.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
In reading your article in the Independent today, you seem to illustrate the negatives of the fireworks program.  It was set as a two-year trial period; in the first year, 10 local nonprofits benefited from more than $400,000 in revenue for four days of effort. It is anticipated in 2013, with additional groups totaling 20, the sales volume will increase to more than $1.5 million gross and at least a 50% increase in funds raised for local nonprofits, totaling perhaps $750,000 dollars.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia and By Mona Shadia | July 25, 2012
A proposal to decide whether Huntington Beach voters should make so-called "safe and sane" fireworks legal beyond a two-year test run failed this week. The City Council did not get enough votes for a ballot measure that would let voters decide whether the sale and discharge of fireworks should be included in the city charter. Such a charter protection would prohibit future city councils from outlawing sparklers, fountains and other small fireworks allowed by the state. Authority of whether residents can continue to sell and set off legal fireworks — as they did for the first time in 25 years this month — will remain with the council for the duration of the two-year trial period.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 23, 2014
A proposed Huntington Beach ordinance would hold a home's occupants responsible for fireworks set off on the property. The proposed law, which passed 4 to 3 on a first reading Monday, is an attempt to crack down on people who flee or deny using fireworks on the Fourth of July. Mayor Matthew Harper and Councilmen Dave Sullivan and Joe Carchio dissented. The council must deliver a second approval for the proposal to become official. State-approved fireworks were recently made illegal again after the city had legalized them during a two-year trial period, 2012 and 2013.
NEWS
By Chris Epting | February 8, 2012
You can't say he didn't start things off with a bang. One of Mayor Don Hansen's first orders of business after being appointed last year was to try and lift the 24-year ban on state-approved fireworks in Huntington Beach. In December, Hansen outlined his concept of a two-year pilot program that would allow what are called "safe and sane" fireworks on sidewalks and alleyways on Fourth of July only, from noon until 10 p.m. Additionally, the plan includes "fireworks-free zones" to be located in parks, at beaches, within environmentally sensitive areas and downtown.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia and By Mona Shadia | August 15, 2012
The Huntington Beach Lions Club donated the money it raised from selling fireworks during the Fourth of July holiday to nonprofits in the city. The club gave $5,000 each to the Huntington Beach Therapeutic Riding Center and Huntington Beach Boy Scout Troop 1, said club President Steve Christy. The Lions Club was one of 10 organizations that was chosen through a lottery to sell "safe and sane" fireworks in the city for the first time in 25 years. Other organizations threw their names in the hat, including the therapeutic riding center, but were not picked.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia and By Mona Shadia | July 18, 2012
The Huntington Beach City Council voted Monday to place a measure on the November ballot that would prohibit the city from banning the sale and discharge of "safe and sane" fireworks. The council voted 4 to 3 in favor of placing the measure on the ballot after a long debate and a slew of comments from residents who described a chaotic Fourth of July holiday. "There was nothing but a war zone surrounding me," said resident Joseph Lascola, who showed pictures of large fireworks going off in his neighborhood.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | February 22, 2012
The Huntington Beach City Council voted Tuesday to charge almost $6,000 to each of the nonprofit organizations looking to obtain permits for selling fireworks in Huntington Beach this Fourth of July. The resolution to establish the charge was approved, with Mayor Don Hansen and Councilman Matthew Harper opposing. Councilman Devin Dwyer was absent. The $56,000 estimated cost for police and fire services and signage needed for the legalization of fireworks will be divided between the 10 organizations that will be permitted to sell the so-called "safe and sane" fireworks.
NEWS
February 21, 2002
Bryce Alderton Sparks flew in a debate over moving the fireworks back to the beach, but in the end law enforcement concerns extinguished the notion. City Council voted to keep the fireworks at the Huntington Beach High School stadium, rather than move them back to the beach at Pier Plaza as recommended by the Fourth of July Executive Board. One of the executive board's reasons for wanting to move the fireworks was that this Independence Day would hold more meaning in the wake of Sept.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 23, 2014
A proposed Huntington Beach ordinance would hold a home's occupants responsible for fireworks set off on the property. The proposed law, which passed 4 to 3 on a first reading Monday, is an attempt to crack down on people who flee or deny using fireworks on the Fourth of July. Mayor Matthew Harper and Councilmen Dave Sullivan and Joe Carchio dissented. The council must deliver a second approval for the proposal to become official. State-approved fireworks were recently made illegal again after the city had legalized them during a two-year trial period, 2012 and 2013.
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NEWS
September 18, 2013
In Mayor Pro Tem Matthew Harper's commentary ("Time to add more freedom to the Fourth," Mailbag, Sept. 12), regarding his desire to have the ban on fireworks lifted in Huntington Beach, the very clear message he is sending is that he values money over the quality of life for residents and the pets that these fireworks terrorize. I, too, believe in students who need funds to benefit music, athletics and other programs at our high schools. I also care about our students being able to reach their goals and achieve.
NEWS
By Matthew Harper | September 10, 2013
Those who know me understand that there's a lot I like about the '80s. Like many who reside in Huntington Beach and were around at that time, I liked the music, I liked the good economic times and I liked having Ronald Reagan as president. One thing I didn't like was the ban on fireworks imposed by the City Council in 1987. For years after Huntington Beach was incorporated in 1909, it went without such restrictions, but many people became concerned about old wood-shake roofs and their flammability.
NEWS
By Chris Epting | July 11, 2013
So how was your Fourth of July? For most of us, it was a classic Huntington Beach holiday. Tens of thousands of beachgoers packed the sand, cooked out, enjoyed the parade and of course gathered around many bonfires into the night. But there was a lot of discussion the next day about the number of illegal fireworks that were heard and felt around the city. Also, some people I know were trying to draw a connection between the newly legal "safe and sane" fireworks and the heavy-duty mortars that rocked many neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | July 11, 2013
Huntington Beach safety officials responded to more than 1,000 calls, arresting dozens, putting out at least one fire and confiscating more than a hundred pounds of fireworks during the week of Fourth of July. Police received 1,450 calls for service on the Fourth of July, with 322 related to fireworks, police Lt. Mitch O'Brien wrote in an email. Police arrested 27 people on the Fourth, down from the 41 last year. From July 1 to 5, police received 3,503 calls for service, with 576 related to fireworks, O'Brien wrote.
NEWS
July 2, 2013
I kept track two years ago of which City Council members were foolish enough to vote for reinstatement of fireworks in Huntington Beach, and voted against those who ran again. I will do the same this time too. If their homes were set afire by fireworks maybe they would get it. Unfortunately, it is more likely to be an innocent victim of their stupidity who suffers. Need I even mention possible injuries? Mark Temple Huntington Beach * Illegal fireworks rattle the area Regarding the article "Will 'safe and sane' stay legal in H.B.?"
NEWS
June 28, 2013
"Safe and sane" fireworks will be available for purchase at 10 stands around Huntington Beach. According to the city website, fireworks will be sold from July 1 to July 4. Hours are noon to 10 p.m. through July 3 and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on July 4. Ten nonprofits will sell the fireworks at the following locations: • Huntington Beach High School baseball team : 19640 Beach Blvd. at the Newland Center. • Goldenwest s wim team : 6967 Warner Ave. at Big Lots. • South Huntington Beach Girls Fastpitch : 21132 Beach Blvd.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | June 26, 2013
Last year marked the first time in 25 years that residents could sell and discharge legal fireworks in Huntington Beach for the Fourth of July. But with the change came the issuance of more than a dozen citations, the confiscation of almost 200 pounds of illegal fireworks and one reported injury. City ordinance has allowed local nonprofits to sell the legal pyrotechnic devices on a trial basis for two years, but that will come to an end July 5, and council members will have to decide the future of fireworks in Surf City.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
In reading your article in the Independent today, you seem to illustrate the negatives of the fireworks program.  It was set as a two-year trial period; in the first year, 10 local nonprofits benefited from more than $400,000 in revenue for four days of effort. It is anticipated in 2013, with additional groups totaling 20, the sales volume will increase to more than $1.5 million gross and at least a 50% increase in funds raised for local nonprofits, totaling perhaps $750,000 dollars.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia and By Mona Shadia | August 15, 2012
The Huntington Beach Lions Club donated the money it raised from selling fireworks during the Fourth of July holiday to nonprofits in the city. The club gave $5,000 each to the Huntington Beach Therapeutic Riding Center and Huntington Beach Boy Scout Troop 1, said club President Steve Christy. The Lions Club was one of 10 organizations that was chosen through a lottery to sell "safe and sane" fireworks in the city for the first time in 25 years. Other organizations threw their names in the hat, including the therapeutic riding center, but were not picked.
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