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NEWS
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | February 25, 2010
Duke?s restaurant is an institution in Huntington Beach, named in honor of Duke Kahanamoku, the father of international surfing. The décor of this beachfront dining establishment is tasteful Hawaiian with high ceilings, lots of wood, indoor plants everywhere and surfboards instead of artwork on the walls. An outrigger canoe hangs from the rafters. However, the single most dramatic element is the wall of windows facing the ocean. Besides the three dining areas, there is a straw-roofed tiki bar with indoor and outdoor seating adjacent to the pier.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | February 25, 2010
Duke’s restaurant is an institution in Huntington Beach, named in honor of Duke Kahanamoku, the father of international surfing. The décor of this beachfront dining establishment is tasteful Hawaiian with high ceilings, lots of wood, indoor plants everywhere and surfboards instead of artwork on the walls. An outrigger canoe hangs from the rafters. However, the single most dramatic element is the wall of windows facing the ocean. Besides the three dining areas, there is a straw-roofed tiki bar with indoor and outdoor seating adjacent to the pier.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | February 26, 2014
Though they live in the digital age of instant gratification where quicker is better, students from Sowers and Dwyer middle schools took two hours out of their day last week to slow things down. Instead of having their eyes fixed on a smartphone, tablet or computer screen, the Huntington Beach pre-teens each had a fishing pole in hand as they participated in the first Fishing Derby competition between the two schools. "Because we're cross-town rivals, we compete in all kinds of competitions," said Stacy Wood, a physical-education teacher and fishing club advisor at Dwyer.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | April 5, 2007
As California's 27 coastal oil rigs — seven off of Orange County — reach the end of their useful existence, a new question has arisen: Should they stay or should they go? Some say the rigs have become an important habitat for threatened fish, serving as artificial reefs and a hiding place from fishing. Others say rigs only move fish away from their natural habitat, while some fear the debate is skewed by oil companies looking to avoid costs. Ocean experts from around the nation with many different views discussed the issue on Friday at the Hilton Waterfront Beach Resort in a conference called by Orange County Coastkeeper.
NEWS
October 7, 1999
A dedicated fisher has a secret spot where the fish always bite. A dedicated fish lover is the same -- knowing where fresh fish are broiled to perfection. This is the Catch of the Day, tucked in a single store front of a strip mall near Goldenwest Street and Edinger Avenue in Huntington Beach. In 13 years, owner-chef John Metz and his faithful assistant Isack Ramos have kept the menu stocked with in-season fish like this summer's halibut-on-a-skewer, ($10.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | April 29, 2010
And now for something completely different: Nhu Y Ca 8 Mon, a Vietnamese restaurant posing as a quaint little cottage with a deer head in the foyer, leading to a faux indoor garden replete with faux trees, Christmas lights, faux foliage and booths surrounded by faux trellises dripping with faux flowers. There is also a very fancy VIP room complete with karaoke bar, which is available to all diners unless there is a special event. Even more unusual is the restaurant’s signature dinner featuring eight courses of fish.
NEWS
August 3, 2000
-- Torus Tammer and Kenneth Ma In the last two weeks, 150 mallard ducks have been found dead at Mile Square Park in Fountain Valley. Most of the decaying bodies were discovered in early July, said Richard Huffnagle, the park's supervising ranger. "The ducks died from botulism as a result of people feeding them garbage like rice, pasta, whole rolls of French bread," Huffnagle said. "These foods are made for human consumption, not for ducks." Huffnagle said the ducks pick at food that often has been sitting and decaying for days.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
Mike Sciacca Warm temperatures and a good cause were the right combination for the success of Friends in Service to Humanity's fifth annual Homeless and Hunger Prevention Charity Golf Classic Monday at SeaCliff Country Club. In its fifth consecutive year, the Friends in Service to Humanity held its most successful charity event yet. Each year the golf tournament has grown. Monday's tournament drew a confirmed 108 golfers -- the largest in the tournament's history -- topping the previous record of 102 set in 2002.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Markowitz | April 23, 2014
I thought it was time to check out the Cannery restaurant because it has a new chef, Nick Weber, and a new menu. The original building was an actual fish cannery beginning in 1921. In 1973, it was remodeled as a restaurant and sold in 1999 to current owner Ron Salisbury. Much of the interior still retains the factory look, but now it is a very attractive factory, painted in pale gray and white, with soft lighting and a wall of windows overlooking water in Newport Beach. Guests can dine on the nice deck patio while watching the constant parade of boats.
NEWS
June 22, 2000
June is the big month for family gatherings, for weddings and for graduations. One place to consider taking the family is the N.Y. Seafood Buffet on the southwest corner of Edinger Avenue and Goldenwest Street in the Expo Design Center, where big tables and booths nourish the exchange of family news, as well as appetites. Here everyone can design his or her own entree from the stir-fry center, the double-sided steam buffet and iced fruit trays, where variety and freshness dominate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Markowitz | April 23, 2014
I thought it was time to check out the Cannery restaurant because it has a new chef, Nick Weber, and a new menu. The original building was an actual fish cannery beginning in 1921. In 1973, it was remodeled as a restaurant and sold in 1999 to current owner Ron Salisbury. Much of the interior still retains the factory look, but now it is a very attractive factory, painted in pale gray and white, with soft lighting and a wall of windows overlooking water in Newport Beach. Guests can dine on the nice deck patio while watching the constant parade of boats.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 21, 2014
Constant chirping from dozens of birds might get on some people's nerves, but the noise is music to science teacher Jayson Ruth's ears. The educator from Huntington Beach High School listened and watched dozens of varying species of terns from the comfort of his home on a recent Friday morning, thanks to the camera he installed at the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve. "Some people find it totally annoying. I kind of find it soothing," Ruth said. "It makes me feel like I'm really there when I listen to all that.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | February 26, 2014
Though they live in the digital age of instant gratification where quicker is better, students from Sowers and Dwyer middle schools took two hours out of their day last week to slow things down. Instead of having their eyes fixed on a smartphone, tablet or computer screen, the Huntington Beach pre-teens each had a fishing pole in hand as they participated in the first Fishing Derby competition between the two schools. "Because we're cross-town rivals, we compete in all kinds of competitions," said Stacy Wood, a physical-education teacher and fishing club advisor at Dwyer.
NEWS
By Beau Nicolette | December 10, 2013
With a half moon lighting the calm surf, Joseph Ali figured he would go lobster hunting Monday night at the end of the Huntington Beach Pier. After more than an hour free-diving through the barnacle-covered pilings, the Huntington Beach resident came to the surface hugging a nearly 18-pound monster "bug. " "It's the biggest lobster I've caught in my life," he said of the spiny crustacean. For Ali, 27, whose parents own Zack's Pier Plaza, going out alone in the 53-degree water to hunt among the pilings did not warrant a second thought.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brittany Woolsey | June 19, 2013
The rest of the United States will get a musical taste of Huntington Beach this summer as three Surf City bands embark on the nationwide Vans Warped Tour. The annual festival will include Huntington Beach ska band and Warped Tour veteran Reel Big Fish, as well as the Aquabats and Pacific Dub. Since its start in 1995, Warped Tour has been a stomping ground for a variety of artists, including No Doubt, Sublime, Bad Religion, the Offspring and Katy Perry. The tour began as a skate and punk festival but has evolved into what founder Kevin Lyman calls a "musical wonderland," adding metal, electronica and other genres to the mix. This year, Lyman said, more than 100 bands will play on nine stages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brittany Woolsey | July 31, 2012
After completing a nationwide tour last weekend, Huntington Beach ska bands Reel Big Fish and Suburban Legends returned home to Orange County on Saturday for a final tour performance at the City National Grove of Anaheim. Kicking off the show, the Maxies, a pop-punk band from Greenland, played humorous songs to get the crowd riled up. Although a different genre than the rest of the bands on the bill, the Maxies proved that they were still welcomed by the crowd of ska fans. Throughout their set, they poked fun at the other bands, such as the "dancing girls" in Suburban Legends - referring to the group's onstage choreography.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brittany Woolsey | July 25, 2012
Huntington Beach ska rockers Reel Big Fish have swum back into the music scene with their latest release, "Candy Coated Fury. " The band's first album of original music since 2007's "Monkeys for Nothin' and the Chimps for Free," "Candy Coated Fury" - due out July 31 - is everything a Reel Big Fish fan would expect. It's vulgar, sarcastic and still somewhat charming. It's what Ryland Steen (drums), in a recent interview with the Independent, described as a "Sour Patch quality. " While it is a great comeback album due to a familiar sound, that same factor makes it off-putting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brittany Woolsey | July 3, 2012
Reel Big Fish was a huge influence in the '90s ska scene, and with a nationwide tour and the upcoming release of its new record, the Huntington Beach band hopes to revive its popularity. In its heyday, Reel Big Fish's "Everything Sucks" peaked at No. 57 on the Billboard charts, staying on the charts for 32 weeks. Its humorous song "Sell Out" became well-known in mainstream venues, including MTV. Since "Everything Sucks," Reel Big Fish released a number of albums that didn't match its success.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | May 30, 2012
Folks in Laguna Beach and Newport Coast won't have to journey to the Balboa Peninsula anymore to get their sensational, fresh fish tacos from Bear Flag Fish Co. This casual restaurant and seafood market has opened a location in the Crystal Cove Promenade. Just like the original, it's been packed since the day it opened. Owners Thomas and Erika Carson created the company based on "the love of the ocean and, most of all, the love and knowledge of fresh seafood. " Thomas, a Newport native, grew up working on his dad's fishing boat called Bear Flag.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Greer Wylder | April 25, 2012
The SlapFish sustainable seafood food truck has come to a halt, but loyal followers and new fans can revel in news that SlapFish just opened its first restaurant in Huntington Beach. The fast-moving, casual eatery offers an inventive, chef-driven menu, while focusing on fresh, responsibly-sourced, and healthy seafood - which is a passion of SlapFish owners Chef Jeff Andrew Gruel and Jethro Naude. The two, self-described "ocean-a-holics" grew up fishing, surfing and working in the restaurant industry.
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