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By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | October 2, 2005
{LDQUO}Went missing," "gone missing" and their root form "go missing" are horrible, grammatically indefensible expressions that should be banned from the English language, and anyone who uses them should be tarred and feathered, so say two prominent language columnists and countless grammar sticklers. "'Went missing' must go," the Writers Art columnist James Kilpatrick wrote in 2003. "The idiom has worn out its novelty." Self-appointed Word Guy and syndicated columnist Rob Kyff chose a differently conjugated victim, "go missing," but the sentiment was the same.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | August 24, 2005
Dear Reader: Please clip and sign the following petition and send it to your representative. I, the below-signed petitioner, hereby support a plan to create a federal department called The Office of Cutting the Bull in Grammar and Style Rules and Deciding Once and For All What Certain Rules Shall Be." This office shall be lead by June Casagrande whoseshall hold periodic summits of nation's foremost language authorities. These authorities will convene to decide by simple majority the nation's official positions on certain language issues.
NEWS
September 2, 1999
Ellen McCarty FOUNTAIN VALLEY -- A writing class offered this fall will help senior citizens break the rules and free their creative spirit, said Cathy McGough, vice president of the Huntington Beach Union High School District's adult school. Dr. Ross Winterowd, a nationally renowned professor emeritus at USC, will lead the 10-week class. His hands-on instruction may seem revolutionary to anyone who attended high school before the 1970s, McGough said, but that's expected.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | August 28, 2005
Dear Reader: Please clip and sign the following petition and send it to your representative in Washington. I, the below-signed petitioner, hereby support a plan to create a federal department called the Office of Cutting the Bull in Grammar and Style Rules and Deciding Once and For All What Certain Rules Shall Be. (I, the petitioner, feel that's an appropriately unwieldy name for a government office.) This office shall be created by budgeting just $95,000 a year to be paid as salary to June Casagrande, whose part-time job (five to 15 hours a month)
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | September 28, 2005
{LDQUO}Went missing," "gone missing" and their root form "go missing" are horrible, grammatically indefensible expressions that should be banned from the English language and anyone who uses them should be tarred and feathered, so say two prominent language columnists and countless grammar sticklers. "'Went missing' must go," the Writers Art columnist James Kilpatrick wrote in 2003. "The idiom has worn out its novelty." Self-appointed Word Guy and syndicated columnist Rob Kyff chose a differently conjugated victim, "go missing," but the sentiment was the same.
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | June 9, 2006
It's a beautiful, sunny day in Burbank, and I'm sitting in a broadcasting studio with two of the five Satellite Sisters. If you're not familiar with this nationally syndicated ABC Radio show, the Satellite Sisters are five real-life sisters who broadcast live from three different locations — the cleverest way I've heard yet of getting the boss to pay for you to chat long-distance with your sister in Moscow. The Satellite Sisters are also cool women — the kind of people I'd like to hang out with if I could figure out a way to say, "Will you be my friends," without sounding like that mousy-haired girl in high school who always wanted to hang out with the cheerleaders.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | August 14, 2005
In an episode of "The Simpsons," a Canadian Coast Guard officer gets into a shouting match with his American counterparts. The hilariously innocuous insults fly, culminating with the Canadian calling Americans a bunch of "Shatner-stealing Mexico touchers." And with this, I have once again I found a way to parlay TV and laziness into a dazzlingly insightful and indispensable column. The Canadian character's jab opens up a can of the very slimy and slippery worms that are hyphenation.
NEWS
By JERRY PERSON | September 27, 2007
This month the country remembered with solemn prayers the men and women who perished the morning of Sept. 11, 2001. The day became Patriot Day and it was celebrated in Huntington Beach at Pier Plaza. More than 60 years ago the world was faced with Hitler’s dreaded Gestapo during World War II. This week we’re going to look back to the boys of Huntington who believed in their country and, in the end, gave everything. It was on New Year’s Day 1944 that a messenger arrived with a telegram from the War Department at the home of our then-city attorney, Ray Overacker.
NEWS
July 10, 2003
A LOOK BACK In only a few short months the Huntington Beach City School District will be celebrating its 100th anniversary. From the very first of our grammar schools in Pacific City and Huntington Beach our students were taught that there are seven continents. The continent of Africa was probably the most remarkable of the seven and the one whose history was shrouded in mystery and lore. This week we are not going to look at that African continent, but to a man whose last name was Africa.
NEWS
By: JOSEPH N. BELL | September 29, 2005
This is an apology to all the people whose letters I haven't answered. The pile on my desk measures about an inch-and-a-half, going back quite awhile, all saved with the best of intentions -- and the worst of execution. I can blame this on my age, my skills -- developed over six decades -- at procrastination, or just plain lassitude. About the only legitimate excuse I can offer is the removal of the Pilot office from Bay Street -- where I dropped in weekly to pick up mail -- to the old Times building, a place I seldom visited even when I was writing a column for The Times.
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NEWS
By JERRY PERSON | September 27, 2007
This month the country remembered with solemn prayers the men and women who perished the morning of Sept. 11, 2001. The day became Patriot Day and it was celebrated in Huntington Beach at Pier Plaza. More than 60 years ago the world was faced with Hitler’s dreaded Gestapo during World War II. This week we’re going to look back to the boys of Huntington who believed in their country and, in the end, gave everything. It was on New Year’s Day 1944 that a messenger arrived with a telegram from the War Department at the home of our then-city attorney, Ray Overacker.
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FEATURES
By JERRY PERSON | July 20, 2006
Last week we visited some of our early teachers at Huntington Beach High, and I would be amiss if I didn't do the same for our own elementary school teachers before they give me an "F" on my report card. This week we'll journey back to grammar school, to a time when America was in the last days of World War II and our residents were feeling safer from a surprise attack. It was on April 25, 1945 that Huntington Beach Central Elementary School chose to unveil the talents of its students during public school week.
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | June 9, 2006
It's a beautiful, sunny day in Burbank, and I'm sitting in a broadcasting studio with two of the five Satellite Sisters. If you're not familiar with this nationally syndicated ABC Radio show, the Satellite Sisters are five real-life sisters who broadcast live from three different locations — the cleverest way I've heard yet of getting the boss to pay for you to chat long-distance with your sister in Moscow. The Satellite Sisters are also cool women — the kind of people I'd like to hang out with if I could figure out a way to say, "Will you be my friends," without sounding like that mousy-haired girl in high school who always wanted to hang out with the cheerleaders.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | October 2, 2005
{LDQUO}Went missing," "gone missing" and their root form "go missing" are horrible, grammatically indefensible expressions that should be banned from the English language, and anyone who uses them should be tarred and feathered, so say two prominent language columnists and countless grammar sticklers. "'Went missing' must go," the Writers Art columnist James Kilpatrick wrote in 2003. "The idiom has worn out its novelty." Self-appointed Word Guy and syndicated columnist Rob Kyff chose a differently conjugated victim, "go missing," but the sentiment was the same.
NEWS
By: JOSEPH N. BELL | September 29, 2005
This is an apology to all the people whose letters I haven't answered. The pile on my desk measures about an inch-and-a-half, going back quite awhile, all saved with the best of intentions -- and the worst of execution. I can blame this on my age, my skills -- developed over six decades -- at procrastination, or just plain lassitude. About the only legitimate excuse I can offer is the removal of the Pilot office from Bay Street -- where I dropped in weekly to pick up mail -- to the old Times building, a place I seldom visited even when I was writing a column for The Times.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | September 28, 2005
{LDQUO}Went missing," "gone missing" and their root form "go missing" are horrible, grammatically indefensible expressions that should be banned from the English language and anyone who uses them should be tarred and feathered, so say two prominent language columnists and countless grammar sticklers. "'Went missing' must go," the Writers Art columnist James Kilpatrick wrote in 2003. "The idiom has worn out its novelty." Self-appointed Word Guy and syndicated columnist Rob Kyff chose a differently conjugated victim, "go missing," but the sentiment was the same.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | August 28, 2005
Dear Reader: Please clip and sign the following petition and send it to your representative in Washington. I, the below-signed petitioner, hereby support a plan to create a federal department called the Office of Cutting the Bull in Grammar and Style Rules and Deciding Once and For All What Certain Rules Shall Be. (I, the petitioner, feel that's an appropriately unwieldy name for a government office.) This office shall be created by budgeting just $95,000 a year to be paid as salary to June Casagrande, whose part-time job (five to 15 hours a month)
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | August 24, 2005
Dear Reader: Please clip and sign the following petition and send it to your representative. I, the below-signed petitioner, hereby support a plan to create a federal department called The Office of Cutting the Bull in Grammar and Style Rules and Deciding Once and For All What Certain Rules Shall Be." This office shall be lead by June Casagrande whoseshall hold periodic summits of nation's foremost language authorities. These authorities will convene to decide by simple majority the nation's official positions on certain language issues.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | August 14, 2005
In an episode of "The Simpsons," a Canadian Coast Guard officer gets into a shouting match with his American counterparts. The hilariously innocuous insults fly, culminating with the Canadian calling Americans a bunch of "Shatner-stealing Mexico touchers." And with this, I have once again I found a way to parlay TV and laziness into a dazzlingly insightful and indispensable column. The Canadian character's jab opens up a can of the very slimy and slippery worms that are hyphenation.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | August 7, 2005
I don't remember when I began writing this column, and frankly, I'm too lazy to find out. Suffice it to say that it's been more than two years, less than three. Either way, I've been writing about grammar long enough that I should be able to open up the glossary section of the "Oxford English Grammar" without crying or screaming. Or so you'd think. Nonstandard relative pronouns. Notional criteria. Situational deixis. Allomorph. Dative case. Extraposed postmodifier.
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