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NEWS
August 31, 2000
Angelique Flores HUNTINGTON BEACH -- Moe Khakbaz lives in a trailer with his wife and three children. After 11 years, the Tustin man will soon own his own home with the help of Habitat for Humanity. Both the Khakbaz and the Esparza families had help from almost 70 volunteers Saturday in putting up the walls to their new homes in Huntington Beach. "It was amazing all those people gave up their time, their family time, to come in to help a stranger build a house," Khakbaz said.
NEWS
By Amanda Pennington | July 20, 2006
Elvia Alvarado said her family's dreams are going to come true on Saturday. After putting in 500 hours of sweat equity and taking multiple budgeting and home maintenance classes, the Alvarado family will finally be handed the keys to their new two-bedroom Huntington Beach home, which they helped build. "I'm very happy," Alvarado said in Spanish to Tina Sage, who translated. "I enjoyed every moment of it." Habitat for Humanity chose the Alvarados so they could work toward owning the new home, and on Saturday will be the seventh family to do so in Huntington.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | April 5, 2007
As California's 27 coastal oil rigs — seven off of Orange County — reach the end of their useful existence, a new question has arisen: Should they stay or should they go? Some say the rigs have become an important habitat for threatened fish, serving as artificial reefs and a hiding place from fishing. Others say rigs only move fish away from their natural habitat, while some fear the debate is skewed by oil companies looking to avoid costs. Ocean experts from around the nation with many different views discussed the issue on Friday at the Hilton Waterfront Beach Resort in a conference called by Orange County Coastkeeper.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | March 1, 2007
Hurricane-ravaged New Orleans is almost 1,900 miles away from Huntington Beach, and to many that ruined city seems a world away. Yet dozens of Huntington residents have tried in recent weeks to bridge the gap, as two separate teams traveled there to lend a hand. In a charitable coincidence, both Habitat for Humanity of Orange County and St. Bonaventure Church in Huntington Beach sent teams to New Orleans recently. Those who went with each group worked at a feverish pace to give residents livable homes.
NEWS
April 20, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- A resident is organizing a protest Saturday to protect a tiny wetland by Beach Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway that a developer plans to destroy. The California Coastal Commission decided last week to allow the Robert Mayer Corp. to fill the sensitive habitat under the condition that the developer create a wetlands area four times larger across town at the Donald G. Shipley Nature Center. But Joe Racano is so committed to preserving the small coastal piece that he's "going on the offensive," he said.
NEWS
By: Mark R. Madler | September 28, 2005
Monday was drill day for Burbank Fire Department Station 11 and for one group of firefighters that meant picking up a hammer rather than a fire hose. Ten firefighters from the station helped assemble the interior and exterior walls of houses that will be shipped to Louisiana to become the new homes for people left homeless by Hurricane Katrina. "A lot of the guys had wanted to go to Louisiana but can't," Fire Capt. Jim Baldridge said. "This is one way to give directly back to the folks beside just giving money in a basket.
NEWS
March 30, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- As a single mother with three children, Alexandra Patino couldn't afford a home when she moved here in 1982. She struggled to pay the $750 rent on her three-bedroom apartment, often bargaining with the manager for a discount. Striving to make ends meet, Patino cleaned the houses of the wealthy in Huntington Harbour. She envied their good fortune until a year ago. Last March, she moved into her own castle with the help of a city program and the nonprofit Habitat for Humanity.
FEATURES
April 9, 2009
The Orange County Conservation Corps donated a team of seven members to assist with the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve?s Earth Day family fun event last Saturday. The Bolsa Chica Conservancy and the Corps have had a long-standing collaborative relationship, the Conservancy?s Executive Director Grace Adams said, including habitat restoration and education activities. In turn, the Corps members learn more about environmental conservation. A small, privately funded Corps crew has worked at Bolsa Chica since 2006, but future projects are jeopardized due to a lack of funding.
NEWS
By: Michael Miller | October 8, 2005
Of all the harrowing images of Hurricane Katrina, the ones that affected Will Laidlaw the most were the photographs of the houses demolished in the Deep South. "We knew a lot of homes got wrecked," said the 10-year-old Newport Elementary School student. "Almost every day, there'd be pictures in the newspaper." After the hurricane hit, Will and his family -- including his mother, Cheryl, and younger brother, Andrew -- held a family meeting in the kitchen to decide what to do to help Katrina victims.
NEWS
April 4, 2002
Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray One of the subjects we bring up repeatedly is native versus nonnative plant species. We extol the recent removal of nonnative giant reed and tamarisk at the Shipley Nature Center in Central Park because it will make room for native plants and the wildlife that depends upon them. We applaud the ongoing removal of nonnative iceplant on the Bolsa Chica sand dunes and the planting of native plants on the mesa because it creates more natural habitat for native wildlife.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Miller, michael.miller@latimes.com | April 13, 2011
Huntington Beach City Councilwoman Connie Boardman has appealed the Planning Commission's decision to allow a property owner to remove three oil tanks from the city's southeastern area while leaving adjacent piping in place. The commission voted last month to approve the proposal from Plains All American Pipeline, a Texas-based company that seeks to demolish the defunct oil tanks and more than 2,000 feet of above-ground piping. Boardman filed her appeal shortly after the March 8 vote and said the council will vote on the matter in the coming weeks.
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FEATURES
By Britney Barnes | April 29, 2010
With plants on each side of the dusty pathway and the water of the Bolsa Chica Wetlands to their right, a troop of Brownies traipsed along the trail looking for signs of wildlife, while making sure to avoid the shiny black stink bugs skittering around on their long, spindly legs. Abbie Ledterman, 8, made extra sure to avoid the black bugs jumping around them as she walked the trails with her troop. The bugs were “freaky” she said. “I don’t like any kind of bugs that stink,” Abbie said.
FEATURES
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | April 29, 2010
While Vic was teaching class the other day, I logged onto a webinar on sustainable urban gardening. From across the country, garden writers called in to a conference phone line at the appointed time and simultaneously logged onto to a web address that had been given to registrants for the webinar. We heard the voices of the panel participants over the phone and could watch their slides on the web. If we had questions, we typed them into the computer. The title of this webinar was “Sustainable Urban Gardening: Creating Habitats for Plants, Wildlife and People.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes | March 18, 2010
Residents are concerned that a proposal to replace a nursery with an RV storage lot behind their houses would attract coyotes and lower property values. The Ward Garfield Specific Plan would turn a portion of land owned by Southern California Edison and used by the Village Nurseries Landscape Center into a storage lot with room for 557 recreational vehicles and a rental office. Residents worry that when the nursery is replaced, it will drive coyotes into their neighborhood.
FEATURES
April 9, 2009
The Orange County Conservation Corps donated a team of seven members to assist with the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve?s Earth Day family fun event last Saturday. The Bolsa Chica Conservancy and the Corps have had a long-standing collaborative relationship, the Conservancy?s Executive Director Grace Adams said, including habitat restoration and education activities. In turn, the Corps members learn more about environmental conservation. A small, privately funded Corps crew has worked at Bolsa Chica since 2006, but future projects are jeopardized due to a lack of funding.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | November 14, 2007
The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve is known as a haven for many winged creatures, drawing bird watchers and photographers from throughout the county. But a species of bird with sparse habitat suffered a major blow this year when someone got a little too close. Officials say Huntington Beach resident Charles Michael Harris, 40, broke rules and swam out to an island full of nesting elegant terns to get a better shot with his camera. Now Harris, described by officials as a photographer working on a book, has been charged with seven misdemeanor counts of violating environmental laws.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | April 5, 2007
As California's 27 coastal oil rigs — seven off of Orange County — reach the end of their useful existence, a new question has arisen: Should they stay or should they go? Some say the rigs have become an important habitat for threatened fish, serving as artificial reefs and a hiding place from fishing. Others say rigs only move fish away from their natural habitat, while some fear the debate is skewed by oil companies looking to avoid costs. Ocean experts from around the nation with many different views discussed the issue on Friday at the Hilton Waterfront Beach Resort in a conference called by Orange County Coastkeeper.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | March 1, 2007
Hurricane-ravaged New Orleans is almost 1,900 miles away from Huntington Beach, and to many that ruined city seems a world away. Yet dozens of Huntington residents have tried in recent weeks to bridge the gap, as two separate teams traveled there to lend a hand. In a charitable coincidence, both Habitat for Humanity of Orange County and St. Bonaventure Church in Huntington Beach sent teams to New Orleans recently. Those who went with each group worked at a feverish pace to give residents livable homes.
NEWS
By Amanda Pennington | July 20, 2006
Elvia Alvarado said her family's dreams are going to come true on Saturday. After putting in 500 hours of sweat equity and taking multiple budgeting and home maintenance classes, the Alvarado family will finally be handed the keys to their new two-bedroom Huntington Beach home, which they helped build. "I'm very happy," Alvarado said in Spanish to Tina Sage, who translated. "I enjoyed every moment of it." Habitat for Humanity chose the Alvarados so they could work toward owning the new home, and on Saturday will be the seventh family to do so in Huntington.
NEWS
By VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY | February 16, 2006
The Orange County Conservation Corps graduated another class Friday. It was the fifth graduation I've attended and, as usual, it brought tears to my eyes. Each graduating corps member delivers a speech at the ceremony. Each worked hard to get to this point in life, and each is individually honored for his or her achievement. It's amazing how many obstacles these kids overcome to get a high school diploma, something that many of us take for granted. Vic usually goes with me to graduation, but this time he couldn't.
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