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By Britney Barnes | July 16, 2009
Blood may be thicker than water, but Hogwarts house loyalties ran strong in the McSherley sisters as they waited in line for the midnight showing of the newest movie in the wizardry series, ?Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.? The sisters identify with opposing houses Slytherin and Gryffindor, which have a notorious, age-old rivalry in the Harry Potter series. Amy McSherley, 22, proudly proclaimed her Slytherin pride in full-length black robes with the house crest?s green and silver emblazoned on her chest, a serpent-green tie and a black wand, as she booed a fan who joined the queue for Gryffindor ?
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | November 10, 2010
Wrenched. Twisted. Stumped. Students jotted down these words and others that caught their attention as they listened to a passage of Harry Potter amid the crinkle of candy wrappers being opened around the room. The exercise was to pinpoint the action words author J.K. Rowling used to make her writing pop in a two-hour writing workshop dedicated to muscle words. "One thing that she does is repeat the word 'up,' so, as a reader, I'm going up the stairs with her, and with Harry," said Sue Welfringer, one of the workshop leaders.
LOCAL
By Purnima Mudnal | September 7, 2006
Ashley MacDonald was a talented teenager who liked heavy metal music, favored black clothes, and had a lot of friends and a great sense of humor, family and friends said Wednesday at a funeral service for the 18-year-old Huntington Beach woman. MacDonald's mother Lisa Marie Guy bent down to kiss her one last time before taking her seat. It was half-way through the service while listening to Coldplay's song "Yellow" that Guy broke down, shaking her head several times. About 75 people attended the somber ceremony for Ashley Anne MacDonald at Dilday Brothers Funeral Directors on Beach Boulevard.
FEATURES
By MICHÈLE MARR | August 2, 2007
The decision is in: J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter story is, alas, a pagan tale, as many a Christian has charged since the publication of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" nearly a decade ago. Thus saith Josh Moody. His declaration was published July 24 in "Christianity Today," days after the release of "Deathly Hallows," the seventh and final volume in Rowling's series of bestselling books. As much as anyone and more than most, Moody should know. He's the senior pastor of Trinity Baptist Church in New Haven, Conn.
NEWS
July 25, 2002
SOUL FOOD In a disenchanted world we still long to be enchanted. I'm ashamed to admit it, since it's now more than five years since J.K. Rowling's book, "Harry Potter the Philosopher's Stone," was first released in the United Kingdom and published here in the U.S. as "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone," but I have only just now seen the movie. And I still haven't read the book. In this case late is better than never. And I will, I promise you, be reading the four published books in the series of the seven Rowling says she intends to write.
NEWS
November 29, 2001
Mike Sciacca A very focused second-grader made his way through the book fair held at Huntington Seacliff Elementary School, navigating the maze of book shelves, all the while clutching what he was looking for. It was the first of the Harry Potter books. It was his to buy, to read, to memorize. If you did a double take, you would have sworn it was Harry Potter himself. But it was Gunnar Rodenas who, had he been wearing glasses, would have shown a striking resemblance to the fictional character who has captured the imagination of children worldwide.
FEATURES
January 26, 2006
The Huntington Beach Independent asked third-graders at Hawes Elementary School, "What kind of books do you enjoy reading and why?" "I love books. I like reading "Series of Unfortunate Events" books because they're interesting and Harry Potter because it's kind of scary and I like scary things." Taylor Conner, 8, Huntington Beach "I like to read "Series of Unfortunate Events" because it's kind of scary and interesting." Shannon McCoy, 8, Huntington Beach "My favorite kind of books to read are novels like Harry Potter -- I've read all six books.
NEWS
November 22, 2001
Teri Simonis Three wands up for "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone!" Harry Potter fans will enjoy a movie faithful to the book. This was a "huge relief" to Derek who said, "There was little left to be desired for anyone who is an avid fan." Those not yet introduced to J.K Rowling's magical books will delight in the movie's lush setting, charming actors and vivid special effects. Derek noticed that "the credit list for special effects ran almost as long as the two-and-a-half-hour movie."
NEWS
June 19, 2003
SOUL FOOD Nearly a year ago I wrote in this column about the movie "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone." The movie and J.K. Rowling's four published books in the Harry Potter series had taken a beating from some religious leaders and laity because of the wizardry that is so central to her tales. Some denounced the books for promoting witchcraft, which is condemned in Scripture. Others claimed the stories made readers more open to evil. At the time, I had not read Rowling's books but the movie left me, well, enchanted.
NEWS
June 27, 2002
Mike Sciacca It was like a scene straight out of "Harry Potter." About 50 youngsters from Huntington Beach arrived high in the hills of San Diego County Monday by bus and car -- unlike their fictional counterparts, who traveled via train and boat. With them, they carried their invitations to stay at a magical place. It wasn't Hogwart's School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, but rather the grounds of Camp Cuyamaca in Cuyamaca State Park. There were no secret doors or passageways to conquer, but wearing horn rimmed "Harry Potter" type glasses and armed with wands capable of casting imaginary spells, these children had come to participate in some magic-themed events.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | October 16, 2013
Strike a pose: Yoga and activewear apparel designer Solow will hold an event hosted by yogi Angela Leigh of Equinox gym from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Irvine Spectrum Center's Nordstrom store. Attendees will enjoy cold-pressed juices and other refreshments, a raffle and a gift with purchase. Information: nordstrom.com . Wine and dine: Greenleaf Gourmet Chopshop is hosting regular wine tastings at both of its Costa Mesa locations. Tastings are $20 and include four wines and paired appetizers and cheeses.
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NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | November 10, 2010
Wrenched. Twisted. Stumped. Students jotted down these words and others that caught their attention as they listened to a passage of Harry Potter amid the crinkle of candy wrappers being opened around the room. The exercise was to pinpoint the action words author J.K. Rowling used to make her writing pop in a two-hour writing workshop dedicated to muscle words. "One thing that she does is repeat the word 'up,' so, as a reader, I'm going up the stairs with her, and with Harry," said Sue Welfringer, one of the workshop leaders.
NEWS
By Chris Epting | February 11, 2010
?I might faint when he gets here.? That what Dean Valesio, 40, of Norco said as he looked at the empty table before him with the row of black Sharpies neatly lined up. No doubt that feeling was shared by the hundreds of other people wrapped around Barnes & Noble on this cool evening, many sporting black leather, tattoos, a variety of piercings and Black Sabbath T-shirts ? lots of Black Sabbath T-shirts. In what could double as a late-1970s concert queue, the faithful waited for Ozzy Osbourne.
FEATURES
By Britney Barnes | July 16, 2009
Blood may be thicker than water, but Hogwarts house loyalties ran strong in the McSherley sisters as they waited in line for the midnight showing of the newest movie in the wizardry series, ?Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.? The sisters identify with opposing houses Slytherin and Gryffindor, which have a notorious, age-old rivalry in the Harry Potter series. Amy McSherley, 22, proudly proclaimed her Slytherin pride in full-length black robes with the house crest?s green and silver emblazoned on her chest, a serpent-green tie and a black wand, as she booed a fan who joined the queue for Gryffindor ?
NEWS
August 16, 2007
Regardless of whether Harry Potter is Christian or not ("Analysts debate Potter's religion," Aug. 2), have we all lost sight of the fact that this is a work of fiction? It's not real, guys. Have we become so dumbed down that we do not have the ability to read a work of fiction, or anything else, and not retain our basic morality, whatever that might be for each of us? The argument that children may be more susceptible negates the fact that any responsible parent could take an engaging work of fiction to begin a discussion with our children and explain why we agree or disagree with its premise.
FEATURES
By MICHÈLE MARR | August 2, 2007
The decision is in: J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter story is, alas, a pagan tale, as many a Christian has charged since the publication of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" nearly a decade ago. Thus saith Josh Moody. His declaration was published July 24 in "Christianity Today," days after the release of "Deathly Hallows," the seventh and final volume in Rowling's series of bestselling books. As much as anyone and more than most, Moody should know. He's the senior pastor of Trinity Baptist Church in New Haven, Conn.
LOCAL
By Purnima Mudnal | September 7, 2006
Ashley MacDonald was a talented teenager who liked heavy metal music, favored black clothes, and had a lot of friends and a great sense of humor, family and friends said Wednesday at a funeral service for the 18-year-old Huntington Beach woman. MacDonald's mother Lisa Marie Guy bent down to kiss her one last time before taking her seat. It was half-way through the service while listening to Coldplay's song "Yellow" that Guy broke down, shaking her head several times. About 75 people attended the somber ceremony for Ashley Anne MacDonald at Dilday Brothers Funeral Directors on Beach Boulevard.
FEATURES
January 26, 2006
The Huntington Beach Independent asked third-graders at Hawes Elementary School, "What kind of books do you enjoy reading and why?" "I love books. I like reading "Series of Unfortunate Events" books because they're interesting and Harry Potter because it's kind of scary and I like scary things." Taylor Conner, 8, Huntington Beach "I like to read "Series of Unfortunate Events" because it's kind of scary and interesting." Shannon McCoy, 8, Huntington Beach "My favorite kind of books to read are novels like Harry Potter -- I've read all six books.
NEWS
By: JUNE CASAGRANDE | August 21, 2005
Someday, if you keep reading this column regularly, if you continue to diligently pursue the goal of speaking and writing perfect English, you too can be like millionaire wordsmiths who never make a grammar or usage mistake. Right? Wrong. You can never be perfect, but that's OK because neither are the big-name, millionaire writers. For example, you need only read to page 10 of the latest "Harry Potter" book to spot a serious flub. Here, author J.K. Rowling writes, "The site, therefore, of Fudge stepping out of the fire once more, looking disheveled and fretful and sternly surprised ... " The author was not referring to the location of the Fudge character, which would have been the "site."
NEWS
February 10, 2005
MICHELE MARR She turned on her car radio and heard a man say, "I don't care what his state of mind was. It doesn't move me." She knew without being told it was Juan Manuel Alvarez the man was talking about. The week before, Alvarez had parked his Jeep Cherokee on some railroad tracks outside Glendale, and then abandoned it. The ensuing train derailment killed 11 people in a train wreck and seriously injured scores more. The early-morning coverage of the aftermath reminded her of the morning of Sept.
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