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NEWS
By Robert Smythe | March 6, 2013
This is in response to the Feb. 21 letter to the H.B. Independent ("Affordability is essential to higher education") in which two well-meaning Cal State Long Beach students suggest President Barack Obama intervene to lower college costs.  In the article they describe Obama as an advocate for keeping college costs low. What? Is this the same president who nationalized student loans, effectively creating a government monopoly?    Competition in the student loan market acts as a check and balance against high-interest loans.
NEWS
By Jim Silva | March 19, 2009
As a former high school teacher, I believe that a good education is the most valuable gift we can give to ourselves and our children. California?s financial situation has many higher education advocates concerned about the future of college accessibility and affordability. Many other states are facing deficits and have turned to raising college tuition to help make up the difference. And while no student or parent likes to see college costs increased, some perspective is in order.
NEWS
January 16, 2003
Eugenie Chia Ching Shieh, daughter of Jiann Sheng Shieh and Suzanne Shieh of Huntington Beach, has enrolled at Harvard College for the 2003-04 school year. Shieh will join about 1,650 other students in Harvard's 367th freshman class, who were chosen from a more than 19,600 applicants, a record in Harvard's history. Students are admitted to the college based on their academic and extracurricular accomplishments. Harvard, founded in 1636, is the oldest institution of higher education in the United States ... Air Force Airman Michael S. Lewis, son of Sheena Lewis of Huntington Beach, has graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas.
NEWS
By Jim Silva | July 27, 2011
The University of California and California State University systems are a source of pride for Californians. They are the best public higher education systems in the world and, even with recent tuition hikes, remain one of the best education bargains nationwide. Recently, however, the UC, which receives annual multibillion-dollar investments from California taxpayers, has begun to forget its primary mission, which is to educate California students. Since 2009, the number of incoming UC freshmen who are out-of-state or international has nearly doubled.
NEWS
By Jim Moreno | March 21, 2012
After a trip to Sacramento to hear from our legislators on the state of California's fiscal health, it is clear that Sacramento is broken. The proposed state budget for next year will impose more deep cuts and mandate an increase in fees for our students. We are facing a $7.7-million mid-year cut to our colleges with an expectation from the state to reduce services and classes for our students in excess of a total $15 million for the upcoming fiscal year. Throughout higher education, our students are feeling the pain of these cuts.
NEWS
February 26, 2004
Alicia Robinson A small-business owner and a longtime rowing coach, Paul C. Wilkins is a newcomer to politics, but he thinks more concerned citizens like him are needed in Congress. Wilkins and two other Democrats, Jim Brandt and Tan D. Nguyen, are seeking the 46th Congressional District seat in the March 2 primary. Florida's 2000 presidential election mess got Wilkins interested in running for office. Both candidates in that election seemed more interested in being declared the winner than in how people had actually voted, he said.
NEWS
September 18, 2003
It seems to be a recurring theme: KOCE-TV needs money, and its board is considering selling it. But this time, rather than entertaining offers from other colleges and universities, most potential buyers for the television station seem to be stations with religious affiliations. In 1999, the station was faced with the cost of going digital, which would cost about $8.5 million over a five-year transition period. Cal Poly Pomona, USC and Chapman University all expressed interest in buying KOCE-TV back then.
NEWS
January 15, 2004
"I'm your worst nightmare." That's not exactly the movie line that many were hoping to hear from Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger this week as he unveiled his fix for the state's financial woes. But his Rambo-esque attack on local governments, college students and state park visitors make that statement even more apropos today. This week alone, the leadership of Coast Community College District and the city of Huntington Beach learned there would be a mixture of deep cuts and fee hikes proposed to their already razor-thin coffers as part of the governor's plan to erase the state's $15-billion deficit.
NEWS
October 24, 2002
Send AROUND TOWN items to the Huntington Beach Independent, 18682 Beach Blvd., Suite 160, Huntington Beach, CA 92648; fax to (714) 965-7174; call (714) 965-7176 or e-mail hbindy@latimes.com. Submissions must be received two weeks before publication. A complete listing may be found at www.hbindy.com. SATURDAY The League of Women Voters will host a congressional candidate forum with Congressman Dana Rohrbacher, Gerrie Schipske and Keith Gann from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Seal Beach City Council Chamber, 211 8th St. The program will be televised at a later date in Huntington Beach.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | May 7, 2013
Huntington Beach native Rachel Field used much of her mechanical engineering education at Harvard to invent ways to help the less fortunate - during her time there and after her 2012 graduation. Field's first major project was developing a suction device to aid in laparoscopic surgeries for Harvard Medical School. During her junior year, she went on a trip to rural India with a Massachusetts Institute of Technology program and taught local people how to use solar-powered lanterns.
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NEWS
By Robert Smythe | March 6, 2013
This is in response to the Feb. 21 letter to the H.B. Independent ("Affordability is essential to higher education") in which two well-meaning Cal State Long Beach students suggest President Barack Obama intervene to lower college costs.  In the article they describe Obama as an advocate for keeping college costs low. What? Is this the same president who nationalized student loans, effectively creating a government monopoly?    Competition in the student loan market acts as a check and balance against high-interest loans.
NEWS
By Jim Moreno | March 21, 2012
After a trip to Sacramento to hear from our legislators on the state of California's fiscal health, it is clear that Sacramento is broken. The proposed state budget for next year will impose more deep cuts and mandate an increase in fees for our students. We are facing a $7.7-million mid-year cut to our colleges with an expectation from the state to reduce services and classes for our students in excess of a total $15 million for the upcoming fiscal year. Throughout higher education, our students are feeling the pain of these cuts.
NEWS
By Jim Silva | July 27, 2011
The University of California and California State University systems are a source of pride for Californians. They are the best public higher education systems in the world and, even with recent tuition hikes, remain one of the best education bargains nationwide. Recently, however, the UC, which receives annual multibillion-dollar investments from California taxpayers, has begun to forget its primary mission, which is to educate California students. Since 2009, the number of incoming UC freshmen who are out-of-state or international has nearly doubled.
NEWS
By Jim Silva | March 19, 2009
As a former high school teacher, I believe that a good education is the most valuable gift we can give to ourselves and our children. California?s financial situation has many higher education advocates concerned about the future of college accessibility and affordability. Many other states are facing deficits and have turned to raising college tuition to help make up the difference. And while no student or parent likes to see college costs increased, some perspective is in order.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
"I want to go to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, and I want to go there because I want to fly an airplane and they have a good program in engineering." Cody Johnson, 13 Huntington Beach "I want to go to Chapman University because it's close and I want to be a first-grade teacher." Lauren Phillips, 14 Huntington Beach "Cal State Long Beach because I want to be a teacher and it's close and I know they have a good teaching program." Kristina Denapoli, 13 Huntington Beach "MCI, I want to become an M.A., medical assistant."
NEWS
February 26, 2004
Alicia Robinson A small-business owner and a longtime rowing coach, Paul C. Wilkins is a newcomer to politics, but he thinks more concerned citizens like him are needed in Congress. Wilkins and two other Democrats, Jim Brandt and Tan D. Nguyen, are seeking the 46th Congressional District seat in the March 2 primary. Florida's 2000 presidential election mess got Wilkins interested in running for office. Both candidates in that election seemed more interested in being declared the winner than in how people had actually voted, he said.
NEWS
January 15, 2004
"I'm your worst nightmare." That's not exactly the movie line that many were hoping to hear from Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger this week as he unveiled his fix for the state's financial woes. But his Rambo-esque attack on local governments, college students and state park visitors make that statement even more apropos today. This week alone, the leadership of Coast Community College District and the city of Huntington Beach learned there would be a mixture of deep cuts and fee hikes proposed to their already razor-thin coffers as part of the governor's plan to erase the state's $15-billion deficit.
NEWS
September 18, 2003
It seems to be a recurring theme: KOCE-TV needs money, and its board is considering selling it. But this time, rather than entertaining offers from other colleges and universities, most potential buyers for the television station seem to be stations with religious affiliations. In 1999, the station was faced with the cost of going digital, which would cost about $8.5 million over a five-year transition period. Cal Poly Pomona, USC and Chapman University all expressed interest in buying KOCE-TV back then.
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