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By Michael Miller, michael.miller@latimes.com | September 9, 2010
Dick Harlow joined a committee more than 10 years ago to help repair the crumbling infrastructure of Huntington Beach. Every time he drives through town, he's reminded that the fight isn't over. The longtime public works commissioner, who left last year to join the city's Charter Review Commission, is among those pushing for the passage of Measure O, a November ballot measure that would require Surf City to spend 15% of its general fund every year on infrastructure improvements.
NEWS
April 6, 2000
Eron Ben--Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- Convincing residents about the need to spend $1.3 billion over the next 20 years to fix everything from streets and sewers to sidewalks and storm drains may be even more difficult than first imagined, a city committee learned last week. A focus group study showed that locals believe more money, especially in the form of a new tax, is not necessary to fund the city's infrastructure, which they think is in fine shape.
NEWS
September 2, 1999
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The city's infrastructure committee began its push Friday to educate residents about necessary repairs and the accompanying high cost. The committee agreed to ask the City Council to hire consultants to devise a way to inform the public about the need to spend $1.3 billion over the next 20 years to fix the city's aging network of sewers, streets and sidewalks. With only part of the repairs covered by city, state and federal funds, residents will bear a heavy financial burden -- either through taxes, fees or assessments -- previous committee meetings have concluded.
NEWS
February 10, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The time has come to educate residents about the need -- and the hefty cost -- of repairing the city's infrastructure, the City Council decided Monday. The council voted 6-0 (Councilman Ralph Bauer absent) to hire the Laguna Hills-based public relations firm of Frank Wilson & Associates to help convince the public to spend an estimated $1.3 billion over the next 20 years to fix everything from sewers and streets to sidewalks and storm drains.
NEWS
December 23, 1999
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The city's infrastructure committee said it probably won't meet its self-imposed December deadline for getting recommendations to the City Council. "The more we learn, the longer this process is going to take," committee chairman Dick Harlow said. The committee has spent more than a year studying everything from sewers and sidewalks to streets and storm drains. Because the problems are so complex, the group probably won't be able to finish its work before March, said Gary Drysard, a consultant for the city.
NEWS
September 27, 2001
Less than two weeks ago, after more than a month of wrangling and internal bickering, the City Council finally approved a budget. During that process the City Council just said "no" to the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program, and then, with the backbone of an amoeba, turned around and funded the program. At the same time, the council also said "no" to funding Project Self-Sufficiency, the Concert Band and Senior Outreach, only to change its position faster than a politician after a significant campaign contribution.
NEWS
August 30, 2001
A random survey of 400 Huntington Beach residents has determined one thing -- they don't want to pay more taxes. The study, conducted at the end of July, focused on residents' understanding of the city's infrastructure needs and their willingness to pay for any needed repairs. "We knew that it would probably be a negative survey because no one wants to increase what they are paying in taxes or fees," Councilwoman Shirley Dettloff said. "But we also knew what we needed to find was how much education we need to do with the community."
NEWS
November 2, 2000
Tariq Malik Chuck Downing ran for City Council in 1996 and is a member of the Huntington Beach Chamber of Commerce. A business owner, he studied at Mt. San Antonio College, Golden West College and Irvine City College, and believes that while the city's civic leaders have made strides in development, he wants to build on that momentum and move the city forward. The city's older infrastructure is its weak point, Downing said. He hopes to change that if elected.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | October 6, 2010
Interested residents gathered for two election forums Monday and Tuesday to learn about the City Council candidates and Measure O. About 50 residents, including many City Council candidates, listened to the arguments for and against Measure O on Tuesday evening at City Hall. Measure O would remove debt service and other costs from inclusion in the 15% of the general fund parceled out to infrastructure improvement, repairs and maintenance every year. If passed, the measure wouldn't go into effect until the 2017/18 budget.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 2, 2014
Concerns about density, infrastructure for bicyclists and the planned desalination plant were among the topics posed by residents at the Community Vision meeting held March 27 at the Huntington Beach Central Library. About 30 residents participated in live polling regarding what they like about the city and what they would change over the next 15 to 20 years. Another group was polled March 22. "This forms the basis of the vision, which is the real foundation of the general plan," said Jeff Henderson, managing director of the planning consultant firm PMC. Henderson said that the ideas brought up at both meetings will be compiled into one document and posted online, where the public can comment further.
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia and By Mona Shadia | August 8, 2012
The Ocean View School District Board of Trustees has voted to place a bond measure on the November ballot that, if passed, would allow the district to upgrade its aging infrastructure and bring the schools up to current standards, school officials said. The board voted 4 to 1 on July 17 to place the measure on the ballot, which will cost property owners in the school district no more than $27 per $100,000 on assessed property value, said district Assistant Superintendent of Administrative Services Mark Schiel.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | October 6, 2010
Interested residents gathered for two election forums Monday and Tuesday to learn about the City Council candidates and Measure O. About 50 residents, including many City Council candidates, listened to the arguments for and against Measure O on Tuesday evening at City Hall. Measure O would remove debt service and other costs from inclusion in the 15% of the general fund parceled out to infrastructure improvement, repairs and maintenance every year. If passed, the measure wouldn't go into effect until the 2017/18 budget.
NEWS
By Michael Miller, michael.miller@latimes.com | September 29, 2010
John Von Holle wants to make one thing clear: If he's elected to the Huntington Beach City Council, he won't be a stranger at City Hall. In fact, he won't be a stranger at city halls, period. The 18-year resident grew up amid politics in Cheviot, Ohio, where his father and grandfather served as treasurer and two of his uncles were mayor and fire chief. But Von Holle particularly knows the ins and outs of Surf City, where he held a job in the Public Works Department for more than three decades and spent two terms as president of the city's Municipal Employees Assn.
NEWS
September 22, 2010
The crowded race for Huntington Beach City Council has gotten even tighter, as a 21st contender has added himself as an official write-in candidate for the November ballot. Blake Rose, a certified financial planner who runs his own business, submitted his paperwork after the Aug. 6 deadline for candidates to have their names appear on the ballot. If residents want to vote for him, they will have to write his name on a blank space below the other candidates' names. Otherwise, City Clerk Joan Flynn said Rose is eligible to post campaign signs around town and join public forums with the other 20 candidates.
NEWS
By Michael Miller, michael.miller@latimes.com | September 15, 2010
Dick Harlow joined a committee more than 10 years ago to help repair the crumbling infrastructure of Huntington Beach. Every time he drives through town, he's reminded that the fight isn't over. The longtime public works commissioner, who left last year to join the city's Charter Review Commission, is among those pushing for the passage of Measure O, a November ballot measure that would require Surf City to spend 15% of its general fund every year on infrastructure improvements.
NEWS
September 8, 2010
Name: Heather Grow     Age: 37 Birthplace: California How long have you lived in Huntington Beach? 37 years     Occupation: educator Education: bachelor's degree in political science-public service from UC Davis; juris foctor and government affairs certificate from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law Previously elected or appointed positions: Huntington Beach...
NEWS
August 16, 2010
Name:  Matthew Harper Age: 36 Birth place: Long Beach How long have you lived in Huntington Beach? I have resided in Huntington Beach since age 14 (1988) and in the Huntington Beach Union High School District since age 5 (1979). Occupation: Governing board member, Huntington Beach Union High School District / deputy chief of staff to the chair of the Orange County Board of Supervisors Education: bachelor's degree in public policy and management from USC; graduate, Huntington Beach High School Previously elected or appointed positions: Board of Trustees, Huntington Beach Union High School District, elected 1998, 2002 and 2006; elected member, Republican Party of Orange County Central Committee (AD67)
NEWS
December 17, 2008
Buying houses to refurbish and sell? Who is watching the city while you meddle in the private sector and ride through Pasadena on a Rose Bowl float? I thought we didn’t have enough resources to fix our aging infrastructure? If we do, why aren’t the problems of the city repaired? If not, why are you spending money and resources on things that are so trivial? Do you understand your roles as leaders of the city? Do you have a clue as to what’s happening in the country and city today?
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