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NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | August 11, 2010
A local environmental organization filed a lawsuit today to stop a housing development on a portion of a former archeological site near the Bolsa Chica Wetlands and to order the city to properly analyze its impacts on the area. The Bolsa Chica Land Trust is suing the city for allegedly violating the California Environmental Quality Act by failing to prepare an environmental impact report (EIR) on a 22-unit development known as the Ridge. Land trust President Connie Boardman said the project should have had an EIR under state guidelines because there is conflicting expert testimony on the development's impacts on cultural and biological resources.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | February 23, 2011
The Bolsa Chica Land Trust has unveiled an ambitious plan for the restoration of the lower bench of the Bolsa Chica mesa, one that officials hope could work as a model for natural habitat restoration statewide. The Trust entered into an agreement in 2008 with the California Department of Fish and Game, which owns the 118-acre lower bench mesa, to come up with the restoration plan, said Huntington Beach Councilwoman Connie Boardman, president of the Land Trust. The goal is to remove invasive weeds and restore the grassland to provide for a viable habitat around the environmentally sensitive habitat area, she said.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | March 9, 2011
The Bolsa Chica Land Trust and California Department of Fish and Game are finally holding a public meeting where they will present their plan for the Bolsa Chica mesa. The meeting is at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Huntington Beach Central Library. As we're sure you're aware, Vic and I are opposed to many of the features of this "restoration" plan. It really ought to be called a development plan. It features heavy equipment, grading, disking the soil, installation of solar panels and a wind turbine, hordes of people impacting the wildlife on the mesa, plant nurseries and huge compost piles to decompose 500 tons of mesa plants each year.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia and By Mona Shadia | October 17, 2012
It took only 10 years and several rejections and lawsuits, but on Thursday, the California Coastal Commission approved the Shea Homes housing project near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, to the dismay of local environmentalists. The commission voted 6 to 2 in favor of the 50-acre, 111-home project at 17301 Graham St., north of the Wintersburg Channel. The project was first approved by the Huntington Beach City Council in 2002. It has since been delayed, modified, challenged in court and turned down by the commission as environmentalists and proponenets of open space, led by the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, fought to protect the wetlands.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | February 9, 2011
The Bolsa Chica Land Trust has prepared a restoration plan for a 118-acre portion of the Bolsa Chica mesa, most of which is currently fenced. The area includes Warner Pond and the former Bolsa Chica Gun Club site, both of which are environmentally sensitive sites. The Land Trust calls its plan "CPR for the Mesa. " On its website, it reports that its plan will cost $4.3 million to implement. Wow. Would that be our tax dollars that it hopes to spend? I wouldn't call this plan CPR for the mesa.
NEWS
December 4, 2001
I feel Ron Davis hit the nail right on the head with his opinion of the lawsuit filed by Signal Landmark, and it should be an embarrassment to the Amigos de Bolsa Chica ("Signal's Amigos lawsuit just another smear job," March 29). However, the Amigos owe their current fall from grace not due to the fact that the terms of the settlement were disclosed, but that they accepted over $1 million from a "developer," without ever having the intention to meet or work with the coalition with open minds.
NEWS
June 4, 2009
The ?Natural Perspectives? column in your May 28 to June 3 edition (?Land Trust?s plan for the mesa revealed?) left this reader wondering: Is this a case of professional envy? Why else would Lou Murray and Vic Leipzig publish such a vitriolic critique of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust?s plan to create a functioning ecosystem for flora and fauna on the most important open space in Huntington Beach? Could they be feeling the disappointment of opportunity lost, knowing that this 10-year plan is to be accomplished with volunteer labor?
NEWS
May 2, 2002
Danette Goulet The Orange County Planning Commission on Wednesday will hold a public hearing on, and even may approve, the Brightwater Project, a development of 387 homes on the upper bench of the Bolsa Chica Mesa. The plan before the Planning Commission is in compliance with the California Coastal Commission's ruling that is, even now, held up in litigation. Developer Hearthside Homes and landowner Signal Landmark claim in the suit that the commission essentially took the property from them by restricting what could be built to the point where the development is no longer economically feasible.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | December 30, 2013
A state coastal agency could decide soon whether Huntington Beach can rezone a site in the Bolsa Chica mesa, an area that opponents say is home to Native American artifacts and remains, to allow for a housing development. The California Coastal Commission is set to vote Jan. 8 on whether the city can amend its Local Coastal Program - local governments' guide to development in the coastal zone - to allow for new homes on the northwest portion of Bolsa Chica. In a report, commission staff recommends denying amendments because the changes would "eliminate a higher priority land use designation and does not assure that significant culture resources and sensitive habitats will be protected" under the California Coastal Act. The move would also violate a part of the Local Coastal Program that the commission has already approved.
NEWS
March 30, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The battle over development of the Bolsa Chica mesa turned nasty this week after an environmental group sent out a mailer that the property's developer charges is filled with lies. "It is clearly not intended to be unbiased, fair and informative," said Lucy Dunn, executive vice president of developer Hearthside Homes. "It is intended to misrepresent and misstate the facts, and in my book that's a lie." The mailer, sent out to 54,000 households last week by the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, urges people to join the group in opposing Hearthside's plan to build more than 1,200 homes on the mesa, which borders protected wetlands.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | December 30, 2013
A state coastal agency could decide soon whether Huntington Beach can rezone a site in the Bolsa Chica mesa, an area that opponents say is home to Native American artifacts and remains, to allow for a housing development. The California Coastal Commission is set to vote Jan. 8 on whether the city can amend its Local Coastal Program - local governments' guide to development in the coastal zone - to allow for new homes on the northwest portion of Bolsa Chica. In a report, commission staff recommends denying amendments because the changes would "eliminate a higher priority land use designation and does not assure that significant culture resources and sensitive habitats will be protected" under the California Coastal Act. The move would also violate a part of the Local Coastal Program that the commission has already approved.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 17, 2013
The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve is a refuge to many. It's where the endangered western snowy plover and the California least tern come to breed, where visitors snap photos of the fauna and flora, and on occasion, where even a few dolphins glide in the water. But the 1,200-acre wetlands would have been housing developments if not for the efforts of three nonprofits in the 1990s: the Amigos de Bolsa Chica, the Bolsa Chica Conservancy and the Bolsa Chica Land Trust. Conflicts have marred the groups' relations in the past, but they have come to realize the power in joining forces.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia and By Mona Shadia | October 17, 2012
It took only 10 years and several rejections and lawsuits, but on Thursday, the California Coastal Commission approved the Shea Homes housing project near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, to the dismay of local environmentalists. The commission voted 6 to 2 in favor of the 50-acre, 111-home project at 17301 Graham St., north of the Wintersburg Channel. The project was first approved by the Huntington Beach City Council in 2002. It has since been delayed, modified, challenged in court and turned down by the commission as environmentalists and proponenets of open space, led by the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, fought to protect the wetlands.
NEWS
August 3, 2011
Wal-Mart awarded a $100,000 grant Tuesday to the Bolsa Chica Land Trust for restoration work. The grant, given through the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, will help reduce nonnative grasses and increase Southern tarplant and other native species on the 118-acre Bolsa Chica mesa. Wal-Mart announced the grant at a press conference at 10 a.m. at the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve on Pacific Coast Highway between Warner Avenue and Seapoint Street. Kim Kolpin, the land trust's restoration coordinator, said her group had gotten funding in the past from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, but never through Wal-Mart.
NEWS
By Michael Miller, michael.miller@latimes.com | April 13, 2011
Violet "Vi" Cowden, a Huntington Beach resident who served with the Women Airforce Service Pilots during World War II and recently became the subject of an award-winning documentary, died Sunday at 94. Cowden died at 8:34 p.m. at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, according to the Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Department. A Congressional Gold Medal winner last year, Cowden was among the few surviving members of the service pilots, known as the WASPs, who were the first women to fly American military aircraft.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia and Michael Miller, mona.shadia@latimes.com, michael.miller@latimes.com | March 23, 2011
More than 60 groups and individuals have submitted responses to the Bolsa Chica Land Trust's plan to restore the habitat's lower mesa. The state Department of Fish and Game, which developed the initial study in collaboration with the Land Trust, is reviewing the responses. Fish and Game will not release the comments until they are reviewed and responded to, said reserve manager Carla Navarro Woods, who noted that the process could take months. The responses were due March 17. Kim Kolpin, executive director of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust Stewards, said her group is helping Fish and Game review the submissions.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | March 9, 2011
The Bolsa Chica Land Trust and California Department of Fish and Game are finally holding a public meeting where they will present their plan for the Bolsa Chica mesa. The meeting is at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Huntington Beach Central Library. As we're sure you're aware, Vic and I are opposed to many of the features of this "restoration" plan. It really ought to be called a development plan. It features heavy equipment, grading, disking the soil, installation of solar panels and a wind turbine, hordes of people impacting the wildlife on the mesa, plant nurseries and huge compost piles to decompose 500 tons of mesa plants each year.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | February 23, 2011
The Bolsa Chica Land Trust has unveiled an ambitious plan for the restoration of the lower bench of the Bolsa Chica mesa, one that officials hope could work as a model for natural habitat restoration statewide. The Trust entered into an agreement in 2008 with the California Department of Fish and Game, which owns the 118-acre lower bench mesa, to come up with the restoration plan, said Huntington Beach Councilwoman Connie Boardman, president of the Land Trust. The goal is to remove invasive weeds and restore the grassland to provide for a viable habitat around the environmentally sensitive habitat area, she said.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | February 16, 2011
Editor's note: This removes the paragraph regarding the water tanks, which will be above ground, not in pits that were to be no larger than 8 feet deep. Vic and I learned early this week that the California Department of Fish and Game has extended the comment period on the plans for the Bolsa Chica mesa to March 17. As we reported in our column last week, the Bolsa Chica Land Trust proposes to disc, or plow, the lower bench of the mesa three times a year. It plans to build four Terra-Farms of 1 acre each on this 118-acre portion of the ecological reserve.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | February 9, 2011
The Bolsa Chica Land Trust has prepared a restoration plan for a 118-acre portion of the Bolsa Chica mesa, most of which is currently fenced. The area includes Warner Pond and the former Bolsa Chica Gun Club site, both of which are environmentally sensitive sites. The Land Trust calls its plan "CPR for the Mesa. " On its website, it reports that its plan will cost $4.3 million to implement. Wow. Would that be our tax dollars that it hopes to spend? I wouldn't call this plan CPR for the mesa.
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