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NEWS
July 24, 2003
Jenny Marder Surf City residents irritated by noisy planes soaring overhead to and from Long Beach Airport will get a chance to vent their frustration during a community meeting next week. Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration, Jet Blue Airlines and the Long Beach Airport will attend the July 31 meeting to provide information and answer questions about flight patterns, aircraft altitude levels and air traffic noise. North Huntington resident Robert Seidel plans to ask whether the commercial planes could fly at a higher altitude to cut back on noise.
NEWS
August 14, 2003
I attended the Long Beach Airport meeting in Huntington Beach and was inspired by the number of residents willing to voice their frustration and anger over quality of life issues resulting from Long Beach Airport. As a Long Beach resident and president of a Long Beach anti-airport noise group I was not allowed to speak. My intent was to answer some of the questions that were asked and not addressed. The expansion of the airport facilities rests in the hands of our Long Beach City Council, which is politically driven.
NEWS
March 20, 2003
John Martin Your article in the Huntington Beach Independent "A noisy neighbor" March 13 was quite timely. My wife and I have just recently moved back into our home in Huntington Beach. I purchased the home in 1992 and rented it out while overseas. For the past four years we were living in London due to a transfer with my company. Upon our arrival back to Huntington Beach, we immediately noticed the increased aircraft noise over our home. This is something we are not happy about.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
HAPPENINGS Scooting along If you drink, don't drive -- call ScooterPatrol, and they'll pick you up and bring you home in your own car. B1 ALSO: Reel Critics review "The Butterfly Effect." B2 Mary Furr samples the fare at Mangia Mangia. B1 A pier regular leaves Surf City for Argentina, and more news from the surf scene. B1 CITYSCAPE Raising the bar Jet Blue pilots at Long Beach Airport have suggested to the FAA that they fly twice as high over Surf City.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
Jenny Marder Long Beach Airport officials announced a new monitoring system that will allows residents to go online and track just how low planes are flying. In response to complaints from angry Surf City residents, and at the request of the City Council, airport officials made a presentation to the council Monday that some residents say was informational, but not very helpful. "There wasn't any information [given Monday night] that could tell people how problems could be fixed," said Huntington Beach resident Christine Monheim, 38, who lives directly under the flight path.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Jenny Marder Attempts by Long Beach Airport officials to placate angry Surf City residents backfired last week and spurred hundreds to band together to fight airport activity and expansion. Nearly 300 people overflowed a library meeting room on Thursday, pouring into aisles, leaning against walls and crowding every open doorway. Airport officials proposed no changes to reduce the air traffic and noise that has residents upset. As a result, about 100 residents put their names on a list that resident and community activist Rex Ricks hopes to use to start an organized effort to fight the airport.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
Jenny Marder A Boeing 767 roars over Central Park, passing dozens of residential homes in the southwestern section of town, cutting across Meadowlark Golf Course by way of Heil Avenue and then continuing its downward descent toward Long Beach. This is just one of the 20 commercial air carriers that fly over this strip of Surf City daily -- a number that has more than doubled over the past over two years as flight activity at the Long Beach Airport continues to intensify.
NEWS
October 7, 2004
Dave Brooks Rex Ricks isn't running for City Council because of the latest City Hall scandal. He hasn't said much about dealing with the city's budgetary problems and he's been kind of mum on development issues. What's compelled Ricks to run is the nearly 41 jets that fly over his Huntington Beach home each day, shaking his house, drowning out his TV and generally irritating him and his neighbors. Ricks is the quintessential single-issue candidate, running a campaign to raise awareness about the possible expansion of the Long Beach Airport.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
Jenny Marder Planes are flying over Huntington Beach at almost double the altitude, thanks to a plan proposed by Jet Blue Airways, Long Beach Airport's leading airline. In an effort to ease resident complaints about noisy jets flying overhead, Jet Blue Airways Pilot Chief Charlie Andrews proposed the altered flight path to the Federal Aviation Administration. "We understood that there were some noise issues with Huntington Beach residents," Andrews said.
NEWS
July 25, 2002
Rex Ricks Huntington Beach city leaders are considering passing a law banning air banners. It will probably not be effective anyway. The planes could simply stay over the ocean, avoiding city limits, yet remain visible. In addition, the Bolsa Chica wetlands are unincorporated. Besides, the Federal Aviation Administration, not a local city, has jurisdiction over the sky anyways. Sure, the 9th Circuit Court in San Francisco upheld a banner ban in Honolulu.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHÈLE MARR | July 25, 2008
When the nine grade-school boys call home to talk to their parents, the first thing they ask is, “Have there been any Qassams today?” They ask the way we might ask, “So, how’s the weather?” But unless you’re talking about tornadoes or earthquakes, Qassams are not at all like weather. Qassams are missile rockets, which Palestinians in the Gaza Strip lob into the boys’ once-idyllic hometown of Sderot, Israel. As I explained last week, these children are here for a respite as guests of the Silver Gan Israel summer camp, run by the Hebrew Academy in Huntington Beach.
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NEWS
By VIC LEIPZIG and LOU MURRAY | June 21, 2007
Vic and I flew to Seattle last Tuesday for our granddaughter Brianna Murray's high school graduation. We left on Alaska Airlines from Long Beach Airport, which is a friendly terminal to fly from. But we still had to take off our shoes, jackets and jewelry. We can remember when we dressed up for air travel instead of undressing. From Sea-Tac Airport, we rented a Jeep Liberty and headed south to visit Vic's sister, Marg, and her husband, Jeff Blackman, in Vancouver, Wash. Their hobbies are wine-making and vegetable gardening, and we enjoyed the fruits of both of those pastimes.
NEWS
October 7, 2004
Dave Brooks Rex Ricks isn't running for City Council because of the latest City Hall scandal. He hasn't said much about dealing with the city's budgetary problems and he's been kind of mum on development issues. What's compelled Ricks to run is the nearly 41 jets that fly over his Huntington Beach home each day, shaking his house, drowning out his TV and generally irritating him and his neighbors. Ricks is the quintessential single-issue candidate, running a campaign to raise awareness about the possible expansion of the Long Beach Airport.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
HAPPENINGS Scooting along If you drink, don't drive -- call ScooterPatrol, and they'll pick you up and bring you home in your own car. B1 ALSO: Reel Critics review "The Butterfly Effect." B2 Mary Furr samples the fare at Mangia Mangia. B1 A pier regular leaves Surf City for Argentina, and more news from the surf scene. B1 CITYSCAPE Raising the bar Jet Blue pilots at Long Beach Airport have suggested to the FAA that they fly twice as high over Surf City.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
Jenny Marder Planes are flying over Huntington Beach at almost double the altitude, thanks to a plan proposed by Jet Blue Airways, Long Beach Airport's leading airline. In an effort to ease resident complaints about noisy jets flying overhead, Jet Blue Airways Pilot Chief Charlie Andrews proposed the altered flight path to the Federal Aviation Administration. "We understood that there were some noise issues with Huntington Beach residents," Andrews said.
NEWS
August 14, 2003
I attended the Long Beach Airport meeting in Huntington Beach and was inspired by the number of residents willing to voice their frustration and anger over quality of life issues resulting from Long Beach Airport. As a Long Beach resident and president of a Long Beach anti-airport noise group I was not allowed to speak. My intent was to answer some of the questions that were asked and not addressed. The expansion of the airport facilities rests in the hands of our Long Beach City Council, which is politically driven.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Jenny Marder Attempts by Long Beach Airport officials to placate angry Surf City residents backfired last week and spurred hundreds to band together to fight airport activity and expansion. Nearly 300 people overflowed a library meeting room on Thursday, pouring into aisles, leaning against walls and crowding every open doorway. Airport officials proposed no changes to reduce the air traffic and noise that has residents upset. As a result, about 100 residents put their names on a list that resident and community activist Rex Ricks hopes to use to start an organized effort to fight the airport.
NEWS
July 24, 2003
Jenny Marder Surf City residents irritated by noisy planes soaring overhead to and from Long Beach Airport will get a chance to vent their frustration during a community meeting next week. Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration, Jet Blue Airlines and the Long Beach Airport will attend the July 31 meeting to provide information and answer questions about flight patterns, aircraft altitude levels and air traffic noise. North Huntington resident Robert Seidel plans to ask whether the commercial planes could fly at a higher altitude to cut back on noise.
NEWS
May 22, 2003
Rex Ricks I would like to bring attention to the lack of unity regarding perpetual Long Beach Airport expansion. Many letters printed offer short-term solutions that would merely shift the problem, but not solve the problem. For example, some say loop the jets over the ocean and send them over the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. Well, the jets already go over the weapons station. But to loop them over the ocean beforehand would only shift the approach pattern further south in our city.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
Jenny Marder Long Beach Airport officials announced a new monitoring system that will allows residents to go online and track just how low planes are flying. In response to complaints from angry Surf City residents, and at the request of the City Council, airport officials made a presentation to the council Monday that some residents say was informational, but not very helpful. "There wasn't any information [given Monday night] that could tell people how problems could be fixed," said Huntington Beach resident Christine Monheim, 38, who lives directly under the flight path.
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