Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HB Independent HomeCollectionsLucy Dunn
IN THE NEWS

Lucy Dunn

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 16, 1999
Eron Ben-Yehuda A court cleared the way last week for a developer to move forward with construction along the border of the Bolsa Chica mesa, despite the discovery of ancient human remains and artifacts. Orange County Superior Court Judge William McDonald saw no need for a new environmental study of the site at the southwest corner of Bolsa Chica Street and Los Patos Avenue, where Hearthside Homes plans to build an upscale residential community. "I felt that the judge made a good call, based on the law and facts," said Lucy Dunn, the company's executive vice president.
NEWS
By Eron Ben-Yehuda | January 20, 2000
HUNTINGTON BEACH -- Officials for the developer of the Bolsa Chica mesa should give up now that the Coastal Commission's staff is recommending slicing the amount of space where homes may be built by more than half, City Councilman Ralph Bauer said. "This thing is a loser for them," he said. "When are they going to get the message that they're in a weak position?" The staff for the commission, which must approve Hearthside Homes' plan to build 1,235 homes on the 215-acre mesa, suggests limiting development to 65 acres instead of the proposed 183 acres, said staff supervisor Steve Rynas.
NEWS
June 13, 2002
Jose Paul Corona State toxic regulators said they expect a decision any day as to who should pay for the cleanup of a contaminated portion of the Bolsa Chica Wetlands. Landwoner Hearthside Homes and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control are reaching the end of talks trying to work out an agreement regarding the decontamination of the polluted site, said Jeanne Garcia, a spokeswoman for the state agency. Tests performed at the site, known as the Fieldstone Property, by the Orange County Health Care Agency in 2001 show that a 1.5-acre section of the 42-acre parcel is contaminated with high levels of PCBs.
NEWS
August 23, 2001
Earlier this year, after Hearthside Homes filed a lawsuit against the California Coastal Commission over restrictions placed on its development of the Bolsa Chica mesa, we urged Hearthside and Signal Landmark to put an end to the 30-year battle over Bolsa Chica. It's time to do that once again. A proposal unveiled by Hearthside this month to build 387 single-family homes on the Upper Bolsa Chica Mesa near Los Patos and Warner avenues has the makings for an end, finally, to this drawn-out saga.
NEWS
November 28, 2002
Jose Paul Corona A San Diego Superior Court judge tentatively ruled that the California Coastal Commission did not overstep its bounds by limiting Hearthside Homes development of the Bolsa Chica mesa. The loss of the two-year lawsuit would mean Hearthside could either submit a new development plan to the coastal commission, or sell the property. Superior Court Judge Sheridan Reed ruled that since the coastal commission was merely making a recommendation rather than a determination, it could not be overstepping its bounds.
NEWS
March 30, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The battle over development of the Bolsa Chica mesa turned nasty this week after an environmental group sent out a mailer that the property's developer charges is filled with lies. "It is clearly not intended to be unbiased, fair and informative," said Lucy Dunn, executive vice president of developer Hearthside Homes. "It is intended to misrepresent and misstate the facts, and in my book that's a lie." The mailer, sent out to 54,000 households last week by the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, urges people to join the group in opposing Hearthside's plan to build more than 1,200 homes on the mesa, which borders protected wetlands.
NEWS
March 23, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The passage of Proposition 12 renews hope among environmentalists who have long dreamed about protecting the Bolsa Chica mesa from development. "If we don't save it now, it's gone forever," said Bob Winchell, a member of Huntington Beach Tomorrow, a group fighting for open space. By approving the proposition in last week's election, voters authorized the state to borrow $2.1 billion to repair and expand local and state parks and preserve open space and wildlife habitat.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Jenny Marder Gov. Gray Davis' commitment to fund the purchase of the Bolsa Chica Mesa, hailed as one of the biggest steps in the history of the 30-year battle over these wetlands, could be scrapped if voters decide to oust him in November. Assemblyman Tom Harman agreed to support the $99.1-billion state budget last week if Davis would secure funding for the purchase of 200 acres of the mesa and a four-acre archeological site. "This is the first time that there's been a commitment of any kind of money," said Bob Biddle, Harman's chief of staff.
NEWS
October 7, 1999
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- As the California Coastal Commission prepares to review plans for a major development on the Bolsa Chica mesa, environmentalists warn that the proposed residential community will destroy a natural pool and create urban runoff that will upset the delicate balance of the surrounding wetlands. Although developers and environmentalists have fought over the land for more than 25 years, the stakes are especially high this time around.
NEWS
November 16, 2000
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- It's the meeting everyone has been waiting for. Groups of local environmental activists, developers, city officials and residents will flock to Los Angeles today for a meeting that may decide the final fate of the Bolsa Chica mesa. The California Coastal Commission, a state board of 12 members -- including Councilwoman Shirley Dettloff -- may modify a local coastal plan for Bolsa Chica, which includes limiting residential development to 1,235 units by Hearthside Homes on the upper mesa and designating the lower mesa as a conservation area.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2003
Jenny Marder Gov. Gray Davis' commitment to fund the purchase of the Bolsa Chica Mesa, hailed as one of the biggest steps in the history of the 30-year battle over these wetlands, could be scrapped if voters decide to oust him in November. Assemblyman Tom Harman agreed to support the $99.1-billion state budget last week if Davis would secure funding for the purchase of 200 acres of the mesa and a four-acre archeological site. "This is the first time that there's been a commitment of any kind of money," said Bob Biddle, Harman's chief of staff.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 19, 2002
We're just not ready to make Bolsa offer Don't you just love how both Lucy Dunn of Hearthside Homes and Ron Metzler of Shea Homes gleefully boast, "No one's ever made an offer" to buy their respective company's property on the Bolsa Chica? Well, duh, no one's made an offer. Do you think a current, fair market value appraisal has been done for either property? You wouldn't buy a new home without checking comparable prices on nearby homes, getting an appraisal of the home's worth, or completing a home inspection, would you?
NEWS
November 28, 2002
Jose Paul Corona A San Diego Superior Court judge tentatively ruled that the California Coastal Commission did not overstep its bounds by limiting Hearthside Homes development of the Bolsa Chica mesa. The loss of the two-year lawsuit would mean Hearthside could either submit a new development plan to the coastal commission, or sell the property. Superior Court Judge Sheridan Reed ruled that since the coastal commission was merely making a recommendation rather than a determination, it could not be overstepping its bounds.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
Hearthside Homes vice president Lucy Dunn is denying allegations that her company threatened to sue the city or that she ever asked City Atty. Gail Hutton for legal advice concerning the developer's dealings with Huntington Beach. Allegations surfaced last week that Hutton advised Dunn to sue the city in order to get city officials to take action on a proposed housing development the company wants to build on the Bolsa Chica mesa. "Yes I had a conversation with Gail, no she did not give us legal advice," said Dunn.
NEWS
June 13, 2002
Jose Paul Corona State toxic regulators said they expect a decision any day as to who should pay for the cleanup of a contaminated portion of the Bolsa Chica Wetlands. Landwoner Hearthside Homes and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control are reaching the end of talks trying to work out an agreement regarding the decontamination of the polluted site, said Jeanne Garcia, a spokeswoman for the state agency. Tests performed at the site, known as the Fieldstone Property, by the Orange County Health Care Agency in 2001 show that a 1.5-acre section of the 42-acre parcel is contaminated with high levels of PCBs.
NEWS
August 23, 2001
Earlier this year, after Hearthside Homes filed a lawsuit against the California Coastal Commission over restrictions placed on its development of the Bolsa Chica mesa, we urged Hearthside and Signal Landmark to put an end to the 30-year battle over Bolsa Chica. It's time to do that once again. A proposal unveiled by Hearthside this month to build 387 single-family homes on the Upper Bolsa Chica Mesa near Los Patos and Warner avenues has the makings for an end, finally, to this drawn-out saga.
NEWS
March 15, 2001
I'm cranking up the volume on my "Joan Baez Sings Bob Dylan" album to write this. Dylan's words take me back to the 1960s, the days of my environmental protest roots. I've been fighting for over 35 years to save sensitive habitat areas for the sake of wildlife and for the health of humans. This music also takes me back to the 1970s when I met Vic, then a graduate student of biology at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. He had a full beard and long hair pulled back in a ponytail in those days.
NEWS
November 16, 2000
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- It's the meeting everyone has been waiting for. Groups of local environmental activists, developers, city officials and residents will flock to Los Angeles today for a meeting that may decide the final fate of the Bolsa Chica mesa. The California Coastal Commission, a state board of 12 members -- including Councilwoman Shirley Dettloff -- may modify a local coastal plan for Bolsa Chica, which includes limiting residential development to 1,235 units by Hearthside Homes on the upper mesa and designating the lower mesa as a conservation area.
NEWS
March 30, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The battle over development of the Bolsa Chica mesa turned nasty this week after an environmental group sent out a mailer that the property's developer charges is filled with lies. "It is clearly not intended to be unbiased, fair and informative," said Lucy Dunn, executive vice president of developer Hearthside Homes. "It is intended to misrepresent and misstate the facts, and in my book that's a lie." The mailer, sent out to 54,000 households last week by the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, urges people to join the group in opposing Hearthside's plan to build more than 1,200 homes on the mesa, which borders protected wetlands.
NEWS
March 23, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The passage of Proposition 12 renews hope among environmentalists who have long dreamed about protecting the Bolsa Chica mesa from development. "If we don't save it now, it's gone forever," said Bob Winchell, a member of Huntington Beach Tomorrow, a group fighting for open space. By approving the proposition in last week's election, voters authorized the state to borrow $2.1 billion to repair and expand local and state parks and preserve open space and wildlife habitat.
Huntington Beach Independent Articles Huntington Beach Independent Articles
|