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NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | April 13, 2011
In September, the California State Legislature designated an annual California Native Plant Week to begin each year on April 17. Sunday marks the first such celebration of our state's abundant natural plant heritage. A native plant is any species that grew here before the arrival of Europeans. Among these natives are the tallest trees on earth (redwoods), the largest trees (giant sequoias) and the oldest trees (bristlecone pines). Our shrubs and annuals are beautiful, fragrant and wonderfully diverse.
NEWS
October 21, 2004
Dave Brooks Under muggy skies Saturday, dozens of people descended on the Bolsa Chica mesa to participate in a restoration project to return native plant species to the coastal wetlands. In a little under three hours, more than 400 species of black sage, coastal sage, California buckwheat and coastal sunflower were dispersed throughout a four-acre stretch of the Bolsa Chica. The event was an attempt to bring back part of the natural history of the wetlands that had been destroyed by foreign invasive plant species.
NEWS
November 7, 2002
NATURAL PERSPECTIVES Fall planting time has arrived. Avid gardeners know that cool weather and rain make autumn a perfect time for rejuvenation of the landscape. In our yard, we emphasize habitat for wildlife. We have no grassy lawn, so we never need to mow. Instead, we have plenty of ground cover, flowers, shrubs, hedges and trees that provide food and shelter for wildlife. Our stream and pond lure migrant birds, as well as lizards, possums, raccoons, skunks and the occasional gray fox. Some of our plants are there especially for hummingbirds and butterflies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Aden | October 11, 2007
When the Shipley Nature Center opened in 1974, it was dedicated to providing an educational preserve of Southern California’s unique habitats. Years of neglect, however, saw its native plants slowly being pushed out by invasive species that spread through the center unchecked. Passion Vine gleaned nutrients from the soil, choking off the center’s redwoods. Animals that had made their homes among the natural flora in Huntington Central Park became scarcer, and Blackbird Pond suffered from a lack of oxygen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010
Residents can celebrate Earth Day at the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve the wetlands way. The Amigos de Bolsa Chica, Bolsa Chica Conservancy, Bolsa Chica Land Trust, and Department of Fish and Game are hosting free hands-on activities for children and adults April 10. Participants can take a guided tour of the reserve, count migrating birds, conduct water tests and touch a live snake Residents will also learn about Native Americans, habitat...
NEWS
By Shirley Dettloff, Kay Goddard and Amanda Glenn and By Shirley Dettloff, Kay Goddard and Amanda Glenn | July 16, 2012
Ten years ago, the future of Shipley Nature Center was threatened due to difficult economic times in the city of Huntington Beach. Faced with closure, a group of dedicated volunteers stepped forward to make sure that the gates of Shipley would remain open for the public to enjoy. Today, with more than 100 volunteers and more than 28,000 visitors per year, Shipley Nature Center is thriving and allowing the local population to enjoy and utilize the information and natural beauty that Shipley has to offer.
NEWS
April 21, 2005
Bob Polkow After some 30 years of tyranny by the California Coastal Commission, the legal landowner of Bolsa Chica has been given the permission to build 349 homes on a small percentage of the property. This action is probably brought about because the state Supreme Court is examining the legitimacy of the Coastal Commission. Its usual tyranny has been cowed by the court's possible conclusion that it does not conform to the separation of powers. In most cases it blatantly violates the system of checks and balances a democracy provides.
NEWS
By VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY | October 5, 2006
Our weekend excitement began early last Thursday, when we had a surprise visit from our 9-month-old grandbabies, Allison and Lauren, and their parents, Scott and Nicole. The babies had just come from their first "acting" job. They landed a big part in "Big Love," an HBO series about a polygamous Mormon family. Lauren was cast as the baby of one of star Bill Paxton's wives. Allison was on standby in case Lauren got timed out. Babies can only "work" for a limited amount of time, which is why identical twins are in demand.
NEWS
By Joe Shaw and Connie Boardman | February 23, 2011
Last week, we told you how excited we were about the CPR (Community Promoted Restoration) for the Mesa, a restoration project for the Bolsa Chica mesa. The Bolsa Chica Land Trust, in cooperation with the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), developed this 10-year restoration plan, which is in the initial stages of environmental review. The project includes a 65-acre native grassland, additional Southern California coastal sage scrub, seasonal wetlands, enhancements to the Warner Pond Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Area and riparian/herbaceous wetland habitats.
NEWS
March 28, 2002
Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray Mother Nature often needs a helping hand. Or in the case of the Bolsa Chica, many helping hands. On Saturday, March 16, several groups dedicated to making the Bolsa Chica a better place worked their magic in the wetlands and on the mesa. This time, we showed up merely to watch. The Bolsa Chica Stewards, an offshoot of the Sierra Club Preserve Bolsa Chica Task Force and affiliate of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, held their monthly work party along the mesa trail.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Shirley Dettloff, Kay Goddard and Amanda Glenn and By Shirley Dettloff, Kay Goddard and Amanda Glenn | July 16, 2012
Ten years ago, the future of Shipley Nature Center was threatened due to difficult economic times in the city of Huntington Beach. Faced with closure, a group of dedicated volunteers stepped forward to make sure that the gates of Shipley would remain open for the public to enjoy. Today, with more than 100 volunteers and more than 28,000 visitors per year, Shipley Nature Center is thriving and allowing the local population to enjoy and utilize the information and natural beauty that Shipley has to offer.
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NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | April 13, 2011
In September, the California State Legislature designated an annual California Native Plant Week to begin each year on April 17. Sunday marks the first such celebration of our state's abundant natural plant heritage. A native plant is any species that grew here before the arrival of Europeans. Among these natives are the tallest trees on earth (redwoods), the largest trees (giant sequoias) and the oldest trees (bristlecone pines). Our shrubs and annuals are beautiful, fragrant and wonderfully diverse.
NEWS
By Joe Shaw and Connie Boardman | February 23, 2011
Last week, we told you how excited we were about the CPR (Community Promoted Restoration) for the Mesa, a restoration project for the Bolsa Chica mesa. The Bolsa Chica Land Trust, in cooperation with the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), developed this 10-year restoration plan, which is in the initial stages of environmental review. The project includes a 65-acre native grassland, additional Southern California coastal sage scrub, seasonal wetlands, enhancements to the Warner Pond Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Area and riparian/herbaceous wetland habitats.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | February 16, 2011
Editor's note: This removes the paragraph regarding the water tanks, which will be above ground, not in pits that were to be no larger than 8 feet deep. Vic and I learned early this week that the California Department of Fish and Game has extended the comment period on the plans for the Bolsa Chica mesa to March 17. As we reported in our column last week, the Bolsa Chica Land Trust proposes to disc, or plow, the lower bench of the mesa three times a year. It plans to build four Terra-Farms of 1 acre each on this 118-acre portion of the ecological reserve.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010
Residents can celebrate Earth Day at the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve the wetlands way. The Amigos de Bolsa Chica, Bolsa Chica Conservancy, Bolsa Chica Land Trust, and Department of Fish and Game are hosting free hands-on activities for children and adults April 10. Participants can take a guided tour of the reserve, count migrating birds, conduct water tests and touch a live snake Residents will also learn about Native Americans, habitat...
NEWS
By Michael Miller | November 13, 2009
The Bolsa Chica Land Trust has received a $77,233 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to create a restoration nursery that will produce more than 60,000 native plants over the next decade. The grant, administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, will support what Land Trust officials described as a sustainable nursery that will leave no environmental footprint. Restoration Coordinator Kim Kolpin said the facility would run on solar and wind power and could be transported around the mesa, which is the upland area of Bolsa Chica adjoining the wetlands.
NEWS
By Brady Rhoades | November 6, 2009
It’s fitting that Jan Vandersloot passed away in front of a computer, said his son, Jon, who found him slumped over the keyboard. Turns out, his father was composing a letter — no doubt lobbying for this or that environmental cause. “He had such a deep admiration for nature,” said Jon Vandersloot, 25. Jan Vandersloot, of Newport Beach, was a central figure in the fight to preserve nature from the encroachment of development, focusing his energy and considerable intellect on areas of Newport Beach and the Bolsa Chica Wetlands in Huntington Beach.
FEATURES
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | April 9, 2009
Vic and I are continuing our coverage of the many wonderful events this month to celebrate the local environment. First of all, we left out of our previous column the fact that you need to make reservations for the Sea and Sage Audubon bird walks if you plan to go. These trips are limited to 15 for each bird outing to ensure a quality birding experience. The next two upcoming bird walks are April 17 at Huntington Central Park and April 20 at Talbert Marsh. Call Nancy Kenyon at (949)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | October 8, 2008
By taking arms against a sea of exotic vegetation, local volunteers created a local gem. In the two decades following the 18-acre Shipley Nature Center’s founding in 1974, it was a thriving example of the region’s local flora and fauna, right in Central Park. But then, due to budget cuts and a severe staffing decrease, the area became overrun by non-native plants, which sucked up the area’s ground water, posed fire hazards and crowded out its native species.
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