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Plastic Bags

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NEWS
July 27, 2011
As a resident of Huntington Beach for more than 25 years, and a daily commuter on Pacific Coast Highway both north and southbound, I am appalled at the trash (especially plastic bags!) that accumulates along the entire span of Pacific Coast Highway through H.B., but predominantly the stretch between Beach Boulevard and the Santa Ana River Jetties, and also Bolsa Chica State Beach. It is obvious that plastic bags need to be banned in Huntington Beach, but especially at the state beaches, where thousands of people come every day for a day of fun and campfires at night, bringing everything in plastic bags that end up along the highway.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
We cannot allow people who have no concern for the environment reverse the progress that Surf City has made with its bag ban. Here are some things to consider. The 10 cent charge is an incentive to do the right thing, not an illegal tax or a fee for bad behavior. Bags were never really "free. " The cost for plastic or paper bags has been passed on to the consumer. Also, plastic and polystyrene are made from petroleum, from which we need to break our dependency. In addition, our discarding of plastic and polystyrene for six decades has created a man-made ecosystem in the Pacific Ocean, twice the size of Texas.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 22, 2014
An effort to end Huntington Beach's recently adopted ban on plastic bags is failing to gain momentum. A petition drive has so far fallen short, and Councilman Dave Sullivan's attempt to place the issue on the November ballot failed Monday to garner enough votes from the City Council. Sullivan, Mayor Matthew Harper and Councilman Joe Carchio supported the measure, but it lost on a 4-3 vote after three hours of testimony from about 50 speakers. "The City Council majority took it upon themselves to mandate changes that fundamentally affect every person that lives and shops in this city," resident Frank LoGrasso said.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 3, 2013
Retailers in Huntington Beach have seven months to adjust to the city's new ban on the distribution of plastic bags. Though it has yet to take affect, it has some businesses in the community worried. Approval for the ban was finalized Monday by the City Council with a 4-2 vote. The public has a 30-day period to gather signatures and appeal the ordinance, but if no appeal is made the ban will take effect on Nov. 1. Huntington Beach would be the third city in Orange County to prohibit the distribution of single-use bags.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | February 6, 2013
After a heated discussion Monday, council members voted 4-3 to further talks about banning the use of plastic bags in Huntington Beach. With Mayor Pro Tem Matt Harper, Joe Carchio and Dave Sullivan dissenting, the council agreed to reexamine a previous proposal and environmental impact report concerning use of single-use bags. They will vote on the issue at the March 18 meeting. If it passes, businesses can charge customers a fee to those who choose to use plastic bags, Councilman Joe Shaw said.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | August 29, 2012
The massive inflatable turtle shifted in the breeze that whipped across the Huntington Beach Pier on Monday afternoon, looking large and restless enough to crawl across the walkway for a hearty meal at Ruby's Diner. The environmental activists who set up their booth on the pier hadn't anticipated the wind. But the turtle's twitchy movements ended up fitting their message perfectly: that the ocean is full of living things, and that plastic bags are best kept out of it. With the state's two-year legislative session set to end at midnight Friday, members of the Surfrider Foundation, Earth Resource Foundation and Environment California set up a table and solicited signatures for a petition asking lawmakers to support Assembly Bill 298, which seeks to ban single-use plastic bags in many businesses across California.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | August 17, 2011
Aimee Borgmeyer wore a giant suit made of plastic bags that covered her short frame to Monday's Huntington Beach City Council meeting. "It's kind of itchy, and it's kind of bothering me," she said. But the 13-year-old had a point to make: to show the impact plastic bags have on the environment and marine life. She was there along with several others from the Surfrider Foundation in support of council members Connie Boardman, Devin Dwyer and Joe Shaw's proposal to ban single-use plastic bags at supermarkets and other stores.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | March 19, 2013
Huntington Beach is looking to go greener after council members moved one step closer Monday night to banning the distribution of plastic bags in the city. After nearly an hour and a half of discussion, with dialogue going back and forth between council members and public speakers, Councilman Dave Sullivan had one last comment about the topic: "Let's vote. " His comment was followed by applause and cheers from the audience in the council chambers. "I don't know that any minds are being changed up here," Councilwoman Jill Hardy said, explaining why the discussion ran so long.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | November 14, 2012
If there's been an upset in this year's Huntington Beach City Council race, historically speaking, it's incumbent Devin Dwyer's fifth-place finish. Dwyer, the city's mayor pro tem for the last year, held 10% of the vote as of Wednesday morning, placing behind Barbara Delgleize and the three candidates who stand to take the three open seats: Jill Hardy, Jim Katapodis and Dave Sullivan. The Orange County Registrar of Voters has not yet certified the results, but Dwyer's standing has not changed since last Tuesday.
NEWS
By Richard Lara | March 27, 2013
Differences of opinion among elected officials should be valued and respected because they contribute to the legislative process, but they should also be scrutinized. Two council members recently expressed opinions worthy of scrutiny while discussing the city's proposed ban on plastic bags. ("HB steps closer to banning plastic bags," March 19.) First, council member Joe Carchio said of the proposal: "It's [already] on the assembly floor and this is where it should be, […]. It should be done by the state.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 30, 2014
Editor's note: This email was also sent to Huntington Beach Councilman Jim Katapodis, who responds below. Let me start with this basic question of Councilman Jim Katapodis: What is the difference between plastic bags and Styrofoam containers environmentally? Why is it you voted to ban bags but voted against a polystyrene ban? Why don't council members want to allow the residents their given right to vote on issues that affect them? Do you not represent the taxpayers? At least let us decide the direction we should take and not force us to follow an anarchistic approach based on your own interests and agenda.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 22, 2014
An effort to end Huntington Beach's recently adopted ban on plastic bags is failing to gain momentum. A petition drive has so far fallen short, and Councilman Dave Sullivan's attempt to place the issue on the November ballot failed Monday to garner enough votes from the City Council. Sullivan, Mayor Matthew Harper and Councilman Joe Carchio supported the measure, but it lost on a 4-3 vote after three hours of testimony from about 50 speakers. "The City Council majority took it upon themselves to mandate changes that fundamentally affect every person that lives and shops in this city," resident Frank LoGrasso said.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
Inadvertently, writer Linda Newton ("Stop fighting the plastic bag ban," Huntington Beach Independent, Jan. 9) makes one of the bag-ban opponents' many valid points. Yes, the bags "were never really free" but rather part of the costs "passed on to the consumer. " Indeed, they still are being passed on. We pay the same as before the ban, but we don't get the bag we still pay for. And on top of that, we have to buy whatever bags we need. Great, more expense for hard-pressed consumers and we didn't even get to vote on this.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
We cannot allow people who have no concern for the environment reverse the progress that Surf City has made with its bag ban. Here are some things to consider. The 10 cent charge is an incentive to do the right thing, not an illegal tax or a fee for bad behavior. Bags were never really "free. " The cost for plastic or paper bags has been passed on to the consumer. Also, plastic and polystyrene are made from petroleum, from which we need to break our dependency. In addition, our discarding of plastic and polystyrene for six decades has created a man-made ecosystem in the Pacific Ocean, twice the size of Texas.
NEWS
December 30, 2013
Re: "Effort to repeal bag ban begins," Independent, Dec. 26. It's about time. The bag ban/tax not only violates the freedoms of Huntington Beach merchants and consumers, it also takes away something that until now was included in the cost of our purchases. Without the "free" bag, we now pay the same but get less for our money, and we must also buy whatever bags we want. Not exactly what most residents need right now. A repeal stands a very good chance of passing, since most of us seem to oppose the ban. The only challenge will be getting the petition to a good number of residents for their signatures.
NEWS
December 23, 2013
A recent Huntington Beach Independent article ("LeBard homes project revisited," Dec. 12) about the City Council study session Dec. 9 gave the misleading implication that $1.1 million would be transferred to the city by the Huntington Beach City School District as part of a 25-lot development plan for LeBard Park. Rather, that is the amount the school board would provide only for the razing of the current six Little League baseball fields and their reconstruction, as well as the building of a clubhouse and a children's play area.
NEWS
By Beau Nicolette | December 23, 2013
After nearly 10 years as a Boy Scout, Chad Dominguez stood in front of more than 200 people on Sunday to receive the highest rank in Scouting - Eagle Scout. Becoming an Eagle Scout is no easy task, but for Dominguez and his family, the recognition that came with this Eagle Court of Honor ceremony was extra special. Dominguez, who is 25, has Down syndrome. His Scoutmaster, Dennis Moder, said the tear-filled celebration held added importance because it is rare for a Scout with special needs to reach the rank of Eagle.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | December 23, 2013
A Huntington Beach resident has started a petition to repeal the city's ban on plastic bags. Real estate agent Frank LoGrasso, 55, said he has never started a signature drive before, but he opposes the law the prohibits convenience stores, supermarkets and other businesses from distributing plastic bags. "This is really not what I do - I don't do this kind of stuff," LoGrasso said. "But obviously there's something there that made me put out the effort to get the awareness of this out. " Lo Grasso said he believes in the free market.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | December 11, 2013
In Matthew Harper's nearly three years on the Huntington Beach City Council, he has built a reputation as conservative, pro-business and unfraid to put in his 2 cents. He always comes to the meetings prepared, whether he intends to speak for or against an item. On occasion, he'll get into a little back-and-fourth with colleagues. "He'll irritate a lot of people, and being truthful isn't something that is easy to swallow," said his father, William Harper. "He tries to be tactful, but he's got his priorities set pretty firmly.
NEWS
December 4, 2013
Re. " Family sues city after son's suicide " (Nov. 21): There is no greater pain for a parent than to lose a child by suicide. No one will ever understand what motivated 17-year-old Matthew Cline to shoot himself. Sometimes all it takes is for a coach, teacher or girl to say something disheartening. Often the parents assume the child did it to hurt them for one reason or another. Then sometime later, reacting out of grief, the parents may direct their anger at each other, and the marriage dissolves into bitterness.
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