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NEWS
January 6, 2000
THE ISSUE: City officials have delayed construction of artwork -- said to resemble England's Stonehenge -- to get more public input. PRO I'm in favor of the "Surfhenge" sculpture at South Beach. I'd love to see more public art in and around Huntington Beach. I enjoyed visiting Chicago, and they had so much public art. It was wonderful. So I'd love to see more of that. CON I wonder why they spend this kind of money. Not that I have anything against art, but when the infrastructure of the city is falling apart, why would they want to go and spend money on art?
NEWS
November 4, 1999
Eron Ben-Yehuda ISSUE: WATERFRONT PROTEST Vote: 7-0 Summary: The council unanimously agreed to extend the deadline for the Mayer Corp. to file a lawsuit protesting the cost of inspection fees for its development of the Waterfront Hilton expansion. The statute of limitations would have required the suit be filed by Wednesday. The developer is challenging about $100,000 of the $137,000 fee the city charged for inspections. Both sides want to avoid litigation, a memo dated Monday states.
NEWS
May 25, 2000
There's been a whole lot of wailing and blubbering about the whale art the Huntington Beach City Council approved for the entrance to the city beach at Beach Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway. It would be an easy matter to join those harpooning the council for their decision, particularly since I was so critical of the council's expenditure of $52,000 for bird tiles, but I'll have to pass on the opportunity. The 52 grand we spent on the bird tiles came from the city's general fund, and therefore the money was available for general use and could be used to repair sidewalks and sewers.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- A sculpture featuring large whale bones rising out of sand was approved by the City Council by a 6-1 vote Monday as a future landmark at the corner of Pacific Coast Highway and Beach Boulevard. A collection of seven fossillike, concrete bones measuring 12- to 16-feet high will be surrounded by a seating area with speakers that will play a recording of the sounds of sea gulls, bell buoys, and distant fog horns. At night, each creamy white whale bone will be illuminated from below.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | March 20, 2008
Huntington Beach City Council members are willing to consider building a pair of arches at Main Street and Pacific Coast Highway that recall a historic structure, but they want to know more about its feasibility before moving forward. Council members voted 6-1 to check in with agencies like the California Department of Transportation and put together a timeline for a $900,000 pair of arches at the intersection. Councilwoman Jill Hardy voted no. Councilman Gil Coerper brought the issue to the council, calling it a great way to celebrate the city’s centennial.
NEWS
June 22, 2000
Kenneth Ma HUNTINGTON BEACH -- It wiped out once, but the surfing sculpture commonly referred to as "Surfhenge" is now set to sink its more controversial replacement. The City Council voted 4 to 2 Monday to once again approve the collection of 18-foot stones shaped like surfboards, reminiscent of England's Stonehenge, for the corner of Beach Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway. Councilmen Dave Sullivan and Tom Harman dissented. Mayor Dave Garofalo was absent.
NEWS
April 13, 2000
It appears that Ron Davis is just as wacko as I had always thought. Now he's not only talking to a bird, he's agreeing with its ideas. ["Getting the 'straight poop' from Bobo," April 6]. In his last two columns, Davis has blasted the city for spending $52,000 on art. He puts the word art in quotes. Obviously he thinks he knows what art is, and he believes that the historic tiles are not art. His little bird friend then explains in true birdbrained logic that politicians like to spend money on "everything else" so that they will not have to spend money on infrastructure.
NEWS
August 18, 2005
Dave Brooks It's kind of like carrying a Picasso into a nightclub. Or like seeing a woman stop to search a Basquiat original for a clove cigarette, then lighting up and strolling through Naples with her masterpiece under her arm. Whoever thought a purse could carry so many meanings? Maxine Orange did, and she created a place in which high-stakes fashion blurs abstract acrylics into a new way of thinking about public art. Her latest clothing line fuses canvas from her original oil paintings onto handmade leather bags and wallets.
NEWS
April 17, 2003
EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK I heard something this week that sent up a huge red flag. The city has begun phase two of refurbishing city beaches, a project that will benefit residents who enjoy the beaches and tourists in Surf City. What worries me is that besides new parking lots and lifeguard headquarters, the city plans to install three new pieces of art. This is where the alarms sounded. It is a great concept. Unfortunately, it is one that for me, and many other Surf City residents I'd wager, now conjures an image of a two towering, pockmarked concrete slabs sticking out of the sand, with a third resting across the top. Yes, that monstrous waste of space and money that residents not-so-affectionately call "Surfhenge" was the city's last attempt at public art. I cringe at what might be at the beach when it reopens in 2004 and how much it will have cost taxpayers.
NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | June 15, 2006
An ad-hoc committee set up to oversee Main Street closure to traffic will meet for the first time June 22 after being unanimously approved by the City Council recently. The committee is looking at closing about three blocks of Main Street near Pacific Coast Highway to traffic, with a tentative Labor Day weekend date. The economic development director is proposing to divide the committee into several work groups or subcommittees that will look at issues related to Main Street closure.
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NEWS
By Michael Alexander | March 20, 2008
Huntington Beach City Council members are willing to consider building a pair of arches at Main Street and Pacific Coast Highway that recall a historic structure, but they want to know more about its feasibility before moving forward. Council members voted 6-1 to check in with agencies like the California Department of Transportation and put together a timeline for a $900,000 pair of arches at the intersection. Councilwoman Jill Hardy voted no. Councilman Gil Coerper brought the issue to the council, calling it a great way to celebrate the city’s centennial.
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NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | June 15, 2006
An ad-hoc committee set up to oversee Main Street closure to traffic will meet for the first time June 22 after being unanimously approved by the City Council recently. The committee is looking at closing about three blocks of Main Street near Pacific Coast Highway to traffic, with a tentative Labor Day weekend date. The economic development director is proposing to divide the committee into several work groups or subcommittees that will look at issues related to Main Street closure.
NEWS
August 18, 2005
Dave Brooks It's kind of like carrying a Picasso into a nightclub. Or like seeing a woman stop to search a Basquiat original for a clove cigarette, then lighting up and strolling through Naples with her masterpiece under her arm. Whoever thought a purse could carry so many meanings? Maxine Orange did, and she created a place in which high-stakes fashion blurs abstract acrylics into a new way of thinking about public art. Her latest clothing line fuses canvas from her original oil paintings onto handmade leather bags and wallets.
NEWS
April 17, 2003
EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK I heard something this week that sent up a huge red flag. The city has begun phase two of refurbishing city beaches, a project that will benefit residents who enjoy the beaches and tourists in Surf City. What worries me is that besides new parking lots and lifeguard headquarters, the city plans to install three new pieces of art. This is where the alarms sounded. It is a great concept. Unfortunately, it is one that for me, and many other Surf City residents I'd wager, now conjures an image of a two towering, pockmarked concrete slabs sticking out of the sand, with a third resting across the top. Yes, that monstrous waste of space and money that residents not-so-affectionately call "Surfhenge" was the city's last attempt at public art. I cringe at what might be at the beach when it reopens in 2004 and how much it will have cost taxpayers.
NEWS
November 30, 2000
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- A strip mall can be a work of art. Just look at Peninsula Marketplace at the corner of Garfield Avenue and Goldenwest Street, where the city's history is sculpted into a wall of an outdoor eating area. Or the larger-than-life acrobats cast in bronze, which is lighted every night in a Sport Chalet parking lot along Beach Boulevard. For about 30 years, the city has strived to enhance the quality of life for residents -- instead of just the quality of shopping -- with projects continuing to this day. "Right now, we have an artist drawing up a mural to go along with the Wal-Mart [on Talbert Avenue, near Beach Boulevard]
NEWS
June 22, 2000
Kenneth Ma HUNTINGTON BEACH -- It wiped out once, but the surfing sculpture commonly referred to as "Surfhenge" is now set to sink its more controversial replacement. The City Council voted 4 to 2 Monday to once again approve the collection of 18-foot stones shaped like surfboards, reminiscent of England's Stonehenge, for the corner of Beach Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway. Councilmen Dave Sullivan and Tom Harman dissented. Mayor Dave Garofalo was absent.
NEWS
May 25, 2000
There's been a whole lot of wailing and blubbering about the whale art the Huntington Beach City Council approved for the entrance to the city beach at Beach Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway. It would be an easy matter to join those harpooning the council for their decision, particularly since I was so critical of the council's expenditure of $52,000 for bird tiles, but I'll have to pass on the opportunity. The 52 grand we spent on the bird tiles came from the city's general fund, and therefore the money was available for general use and could be used to repair sidewalks and sewers.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
Eron Ben-Yehuda HUNTINGTON BEACH -- A sculpture featuring large whale bones rising out of sand was approved by the City Council by a 6-1 vote Monday as a future landmark at the corner of Pacific Coast Highway and Beach Boulevard. A collection of seven fossillike, concrete bones measuring 12- to 16-feet high will be surrounded by a seating area with speakers that will play a recording of the sounds of sea gulls, bell buoys, and distant fog horns. At night, each creamy white whale bone will be illuminated from below.
NEWS
April 13, 2000
It appears that Ron Davis is just as wacko as I had always thought. Now he's not only talking to a bird, he's agreeing with its ideas. ["Getting the 'straight poop' from Bobo," April 6]. In his last two columns, Davis has blasted the city for spending $52,000 on art. He puts the word art in quotes. Obviously he thinks he knows what art is, and he believes that the historic tiles are not art. His little bird friend then explains in true birdbrained logic that politicians like to spend money on "everything else" so that they will not have to spend money on infrastructure.
NEWS
January 6, 2000
THE ISSUE: City officials have delayed construction of artwork -- said to resemble England's Stonehenge -- to get more public input. PRO I'm in favor of the "Surfhenge" sculpture at South Beach. I'd love to see more public art in and around Huntington Beach. I enjoyed visiting Chicago, and they had so much public art. It was wonderful. So I'd love to see more of that. CON I wonder why they spend this kind of money. Not that I have anything against art, but when the infrastructure of the city is falling apart, why would they want to go and spend money on art?
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