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NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | August 3, 2005
The water around Newport Pier wasn't looking its usual blue-green self Tuesday. "It looks a little bit like chocolate milk around here by the pier," Newport Beach Lifeguard Capt. Eric Bauer said. But it's not Nestle Quik that's giving the ocean its brownish hue. Bauer said the source of the coloration is yet another red tide, a phenomenon that has been seen around Newport Beach in recent weeks. Algae blooms can give the ocean a reddish color, which can fade to brown as algae dissipates in the water.
NEWS
October 19, 2000
Kyle Roeters scored two goals Saturday, and the Red Tide rolled to victory by posting a 6-0 shutout of the Cheetahs in AYSO 56 boys' Under-10 Division action. Kyle Ball, Kareem Wassef, Dylan Garrity and Spencer Lee also scored; and John Dunn recorded the shutout in goal. In other boys' Under-10 Division action: Blue Bombers 6, Blasters 5 Bradley Hansen knocked in four goals, and Erik Kitchline added two more to lead the Blue Bombers. Striking 8-Balls 2, Flame Throwers 1 Joshua Ardis scored both goals for the undefeated Striking 8-Balls.
NEWS
By: | August 7, 2005
OK, sure it kind of smells bad and, as one lifeguard put it, looks like chocolate milk, but there is a bright (blue? green?) side to the return, yet again, of the red tide this summer. Make that a dark side, but in a good way. For those who don't know, at night, red tide -- or, really, the algae that creates it -- goes all sparkling and phosphorescent. It's kind of like the Northern Lights, only a little less dramatic. The good part, though?
NEWS
October 23, 2003
VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY If you've been to the beach at night in the last couple of months, you probably saw it. Bright flashes of light illuminated each crashing wave in a rolling neon cascade. Moonlit waves sparkled and flashed with a glowing green bioluminescence. And if you stomped on the wet sand, green lightning bolts shot out from your feet. But by day, a band of brownish red stretched hundreds of feet offshore, turning the normally white waves brown and sending ugly piles of frothy protein scum blowing across the sand.
NEWS
September 11, 2003
Jenny Marder At night, phosphorescent lights flash through the waves, casting an electric blue glow across the surf. During the day, the water takes on a dull rust color. Both phenomena, seen at Surf City's beaches this week, are caused by the "red tide," a natural occurrence at local beaches three or four times per year. The ed tide is caused by an overabundance of red dinoflagellates, a kind of plankton, in the ocean. Dinoflagellates are single-cell plants, algae, that from time to time swell in number from 100 cells per milliliter to a few million cells per milliliter.
NEWS
By: | September 22, 2005
It was quite the mixed bag this summer in Surf City. Hotels posted record numbers, including a July jump of 17% to $6.7 million. But that was in spite of an otherwise strange and even dreary summer. First off was the red tide. Rather than appearing and leaving within a few days, the red tide -- which is caused by phytoplankton blooms -- persisted nearly all summer long. A brownish, uninviting churn of sea was the result. And then there were the jellyfish, in an unprecedented number and of an unprecedented kind.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
Jenny Marder Residents who live near the Talbert Channel are panicked over what could be causing the death of hundreds of fish in the waterway. State health officials say there's no evidence that the white substance in the water or the potent odor emanating from the channel is a public health risk but said they can't be sure until they get the test results back. It was early last week that residents began noticing the strange consistency of the neighborhood channel.
NEWS
By: Dave Brooks | September 15, 2005
Hotels in Huntington Beach posted record sales this summer, but a lack of waves was a bummer for the city's surfing community. A massive swell is expected to rage along Orange County beaches this weekend. For most of the summer, however, Huntington Beach saw one- and two-foot waves. "This was a pretty bad summer for surfing," said surf forecaster Sean Collins, founder of Surfline.com. A lack of tropical hurricanes in the southern hemisphere has been responsible for the dud waves locally, Collins said, sending area pros to spots such as Indonesia and South Africa for bigger swells.
NEWS
By: Dave Brooks | September 1, 2005
A sulfur-producing natural phenomenon in the Talbert Channel is stinking up a southeast Huntington Beach neighborhood. A lingering red tide, coupled with low tides and higher-than-expected August heat is decaying microorganisms in nutrient rich mud in the channel. A by-product of the reaction is the emission of sulfur gases that pack a powerful odor. Anyone who's ever visited a hot spring like Old Faithful at Yellowstone National Park has likely smelled the pungent odor, which some residents living along the Talbert Channel have confused with a possible sewage spill.
NEWS
October 16, 2003
Jenny Marder County water quality experts say a natural decaying process is causing the foul odor and dying marine life in the Talbert Channel. When organic material decays in stagnant water, it can cause sulfuric odors, a milky white plume and oxygen levels too low for fish to live, said Mary Anne Skorpanich, watershed planner at the Public Facilities and Resources Department. The process is known as eutrophication. Extra organic material caused by red tide, low tidal variation and urban runoff diversions upstream could all be contributing to the low oxygen levels in the water, she said.
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NEWS
By: | September 22, 2005
It was quite the mixed bag this summer in Surf City. Hotels posted record numbers, including a July jump of 17% to $6.7 million. But that was in spite of an otherwise strange and even dreary summer. First off was the red tide. Rather than appearing and leaving within a few days, the red tide -- which is caused by phytoplankton blooms -- persisted nearly all summer long. A brownish, uninviting churn of sea was the result. And then there were the jellyfish, in an unprecedented number and of an unprecedented kind.
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NEWS
By: Dave Brooks | September 15, 2005
Hotels in Huntington Beach posted record sales this summer, but a lack of waves was a bummer for the city's surfing community. A massive swell is expected to rage along Orange County beaches this weekend. For most of the summer, however, Huntington Beach saw one- and two-foot waves. "This was a pretty bad summer for surfing," said surf forecaster Sean Collins, founder of Surfline.com. A lack of tropical hurricanes in the southern hemisphere has been responsible for the dud waves locally, Collins said, sending area pros to spots such as Indonesia and South Africa for bigger swells.
NEWS
By: Dave Brooks | September 1, 2005
A sulfur-producing natural phenomenon in the Talbert Channel is stinking up a southeast Huntington Beach neighborhood. A lingering red tide, coupled with low tides and higher-than-expected August heat is decaying microorganisms in nutrient rich mud in the channel. A by-product of the reaction is the emission of sulfur gases that pack a powerful odor. Anyone who's ever visited a hot spring like Old Faithful at Yellowstone National Park has likely smelled the pungent odor, which some residents living along the Talbert Channel have confused with a possible sewage spill.
NEWS
By: MIKE WHITEHEAD | August 12, 2005
Ahoy. It's summertime. Have you been in or on the water? I cannot believe what is occurring in our ocean waters, between the never-ending red tide, the jellyfish invasion, the red tide, the drop in temperature -- and did I mention the red tide? The red tide is not leaving our shores, and yesterday I could see it floating outside the surf line as I cruised up the coast. Nevertheless, sea conditions lately have been in the cruisers' favor all along the Pacific Coast.
NEWS
By: | August 7, 2005
OK, sure it kind of smells bad and, as one lifeguard put it, looks like chocolate milk, but there is a bright (blue? green?) side to the return, yet again, of the red tide this summer. Make that a dark side, but in a good way. For those who don't know, at night, red tide -- or, really, the algae that creates it -- goes all sparkling and phosphorescent. It's kind of like the Northern Lights, only a little less dramatic. The good part, though?
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | August 3, 2005
The water around Newport Pier wasn't looking its usual blue-green self Tuesday. "It looks a little bit like chocolate milk around here by the pier," Newport Beach Lifeguard Capt. Eric Bauer said. But it's not Nestle Quik that's giving the ocean its brownish hue. Bauer said the source of the coloration is yet another red tide, a phenomenon that has been seen around Newport Beach in recent weeks. Algae blooms can give the ocean a reddish color, which can fade to brown as algae dissipates in the water.
NEWS
October 30, 2003
Costume-clad partygoers eager for a good time in Surf City this Halloween will have a lot to choose from. Organizers are expecting as many as 10,000 to attend the 12th annual Main Street Halloween Celebration, which will feature kiddie rides, a petting zoo and a costume contest open to all ages. There will be 12 rides, including bounce rides, pony rides and slides, said Steve Daniel, president of the Huntington Beach Downtown Merchants Assn. and organizer of the event.
NEWS
October 23, 2003
VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY If you've been to the beach at night in the last couple of months, you probably saw it. Bright flashes of light illuminated each crashing wave in a rolling neon cascade. Moonlit waves sparkled and flashed with a glowing green bioluminescence. And if you stomped on the wet sand, green lightning bolts shot out from your feet. But by day, a band of brownish red stretched hundreds of feet offshore, turning the normally white waves brown and sending ugly piles of frothy protein scum blowing across the sand.
NEWS
October 16, 2003
Jenny Marder County water quality experts say a natural decaying process is causing the foul odor and dying marine life in the Talbert Channel. When organic material decays in stagnant water, it can cause sulfuric odors, a milky white plume and oxygen levels too low for fish to live, said Mary Anne Skorpanich, watershed planner at the Public Facilities and Resources Department. The process is known as eutrophication. Extra organic material caused by red tide, low tidal variation and urban runoff diversions upstream could all be contributing to the low oxygen levels in the water, she said.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
Jenny Marder Residents who live near the Talbert Channel are panicked over what could be causing the death of hundreds of fish in the waterway. State health officials say there's no evidence that the white substance in the water or the potent odor emanating from the channel is a public health risk but said they can't be sure until they get the test results back. It was early last week that residents began noticing the strange consistency of the neighborhood channel.
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