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Rosh Hashana

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NEWS
By: Elia Powers | October 4, 2005
When the sound of the shofar reverberates through the synagogue today, it's time to ring in the year 5766. Rosh Hashana, the holiday that signifies the start of the Jewish New Year, began Monday night and continues today with services and the traditional blowing of the ram's horn, called the shofar. The High Holy Days are the most important time on the Jewish calendar. They include Rosh Hashana and the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, which is Oct. 12. It's a time of quiet introspection, when Jews across the world contemplate the past year and atone for their sins.
NEWS
September 20, 2001
Bryce Alderton Monday marked the beginning of a period of reflection for the Jewish community. Rosh Hashana, the start of the Jewish new year, began at sunset Monday and ended at sunset Wednesday across Huntington Beach and the world. It is a time when Jews celebrate a new year with family and friends. The 10-day reflection period will end with the conclusion of Yom Kippur on Sept. 27. Yom Kippur, known as the "Day of Atonement," is considered the holiest day of the year on the Jewish calendar, when Jews are to atone for any sins of the past year.
NEWS
September 5, 2002
Michele Marr Sunset on Friday will mark the start of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, and signal the beginning of the High Holy Days -- a 10-day period of reflection and renewal that will conclude with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, on Sept. 16. Rabbi Stephen J. Einstein of Congregation B'nai Tzedek in Fountain Valley described the holidays as a time to look to the eternal verities that keep people going throughout their lives year after year.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
MICHELE MARR Fourteen years ago, when I spent a year living in Israel, I could not step up into a public bus without a quick, private acknowledgment that, before my stop, it might be blown up. I would take a seat or grasp the overhead handrail, close my eyes momentarily and say a prayer. Every time I went to a market, a department store or a movie theater, my handbag or tote, like everyone else's, was opened and searched before I could enter the door.
FEATURES
By Michael Alexander | September 27, 2007
Jewish residents of Huntington Beach joined synagogues and congregations across the city this weekend for Yom Kippur. The holy day, a time of fasting and seeking forgiveness, lasted from sundown to sundown, Friday to Saturday. On the day, devout Jews refrain from bodily pleasures like food and even leather shoes, said Rabbi Aron Berkowitz of Congregation Adat Israel, a synagogue associated with Chabad of West Orange County in Huntington Beach. The fasting isn’t about some kind of self-mortification, he said, noting families feast ahead of time to enjoy company and prepare themselves.
NEWS
By: MICHELE MARR | September 29, 2005
{LDQUO}I'VE never seen a house with so many calendars," she said, then stood silently looking at me, as though expecting an explanation. My house is full of calendars. It's true, though it took a visitor to point it out. There's at least one calendar in every room. Most of them show up without much help from me. They come from my alumni association, graphic arts magazines and paper mills (because of the freelance graphic design I do), other businesses and charities, and as gifts from family and friends.
NEWS
October 2, 2003
Michele Marr For the past five days, Jews worldwide have been observing the Days of Awe, a 10-day period of deep introspection and repentance that began with Rosh Hashana and ends Monday after sunset on Yom Kippur. Each year on Rosh Hashana, God writes his judgments in his books -- who will live, who will die, who will have a good life, who will have a bad life in the new year. But during the Days of Awe, acts of repentance, reconciliation and prayer can change God's judgments before they are sealed.
NEWS
By: | September 3, 2005
1. Which team won this year's Jones Cup golf pro-am? A. Big Canyon Country Club B. Mesa Verde Country Club C. Newport Beach Country Club D. Santa Ana Country Club 2. The state Democratic Party endorsed which candidate in the special election to fill former Rep. Chris Cox's seat? A. Steve Young B. Marilyn Brewer C. John Graham D. Jim Gilchrist 3. The Orange County Registrar of Voters apologized this week for doing what?
NEWS
September 20, 2001
Last Friday at noon, in observance of the National Day of Remembrance and Prayer proclaimed by President Bush, I drove to a nearby church, St. Peter by-the-Sea Presbyterian on Bolsa Chica in Huntington Beach. The walkway to the sanctuary was lined with American flags anchored in large clay pots of colorful annuals. The flags rustled lightly in the faint sea breeze. The sky was blue and lit with cottony clouds. I stood for a moment before entering the church.
NEWS
By: Elia Powers | October 5, 2005
This is the time of year when Mandy Wynn tends to feel homesick. She's settled into her life in Brooklyn, N.Y., but something about the Jewish High Holy Days gets her thinking about family traditions. And hers has plenty of them. The Sonenshines, one of the first families to join Newport Beach's Temple Bat Yahm, typically arrive early to synagogue for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur to secure a seat near the front. Three generations chant together, led by grandpa Ygal Sonenshine.
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FEATURES
By Michael Alexander | September 27, 2007
Jewish residents of Huntington Beach joined synagogues and congregations across the city this weekend for Yom Kippur. The holy day, a time of fasting and seeking forgiveness, lasted from sundown to sundown, Friday to Saturday. On the day, devout Jews refrain from bodily pleasures like food and even leather shoes, said Rabbi Aron Berkowitz of Congregation Adat Israel, a synagogue associated with Chabad of West Orange County in Huntington Beach. The fasting isn’t about some kind of self-mortification, he said, noting families feast ahead of time to enjoy company and prepare themselves.
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NEWS
By: | October 9, 2005
POLITICS Campbell wins primary with 45.6% of votes Republican state Sen. John Campbell on Tuesday took the most votes in a special primary to fill the 48th District Congressional seat, but his 45.6% of the ballots cast wasn't enough to head off a general election, which is set for Dec. 6. Had Campbell won 50% plus one vote, he would have become the successor to Rep. Chris Cox, who left to chair the Securities and...
NEWS
By: Elia Powers | October 5, 2005
This is the time of year when Mandy Wynn tends to feel homesick. She's settled into her life in Brooklyn, N.Y., but something about the Jewish High Holy Days gets her thinking about family traditions. And hers has plenty of them. The Sonenshines, one of the first families to join Newport Beach's Temple Bat Yahm, typically arrive early to synagogue for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur to secure a seat near the front. Three generations chant together, led by grandpa Ygal Sonenshine.
NEWS
By: Elia Powers | October 4, 2005
When the sound of the shofar reverberates through the synagogue today, it's time to ring in the year 5766. Rosh Hashana, the holiday that signifies the start of the Jewish New Year, began Monday night and continues today with services and the traditional blowing of the ram's horn, called the shofar. The High Holy Days are the most important time on the Jewish calendar. They include Rosh Hashana and the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, which is Oct. 12. It's a time of quiet introspection, when Jews across the world contemplate the past year and atone for their sins.
NEWS
By: MICHELE MARR | September 29, 2005
{LDQUO}I'VE never seen a house with so many calendars," she said, then stood silently looking at me, as though expecting an explanation. My house is full of calendars. It's true, though it took a visitor to point it out. There's at least one calendar in every room. Most of them show up without much help from me. They come from my alumni association, graphic arts magazines and paper mills (because of the freelance graphic design I do), other businesses and charities, and as gifts from family and friends.
NEWS
By: | September 3, 2005
1. Which team won this year's Jones Cup golf pro-am? A. Big Canyon Country Club B. Mesa Verde Country Club C. Newport Beach Country Club D. Santa Ana Country Club 2. The state Democratic Party endorsed which candidate in the special election to fill former Rep. Chris Cox's seat? A. Steve Young B. Marilyn Brewer C. John Graham D. Jim Gilchrist 3. The Orange County Registrar of Voters apologized this week for doing what?
NEWS
October 2, 2003
Michele Marr For the past five days, Jews worldwide have been observing the Days of Awe, a 10-day period of deep introspection and repentance that began with Rosh Hashana and ends Monday after sunset on Yom Kippur. Each year on Rosh Hashana, God writes his judgments in his books -- who will live, who will die, who will have a good life, who will have a bad life in the new year. But during the Days of Awe, acts of repentance, reconciliation and prayer can change God's judgments before they are sealed.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
MICHELE MARR Fourteen years ago, when I spent a year living in Israel, I could not step up into a public bus without a quick, private acknowledgment that, before my stop, it might be blown up. I would take a seat or grasp the overhead handrail, close my eyes momentarily and say a prayer. Every time I went to a market, a department store or a movie theater, my handbag or tote, like everyone else's, was opened and searched before I could enter the door.
NEWS
September 5, 2002
Michele Marr Sunset on Friday will mark the start of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, and signal the beginning of the High Holy Days -- a 10-day period of reflection and renewal that will conclude with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, on Sept. 16. Rabbi Stephen J. Einstein of Congregation B'nai Tzedek in Fountain Valley described the holidays as a time to look to the eternal verities that keep people going throughout their lives year after year.
NEWS
September 20, 2001
Last Friday at noon, in observance of the National Day of Remembrance and Prayer proclaimed by President Bush, I drove to a nearby church, St. Peter by-the-Sea Presbyterian on Bolsa Chica in Huntington Beach. The walkway to the sanctuary was lined with American flags anchored in large clay pots of colorful annuals. The flags rustled lightly in the faint sea breeze. The sky was blue and lit with cottony clouds. I stood for a moment before entering the church.
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