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NEWS
August 7, 2003
"Discovering how things can mix together and learning about new things I never thought about before." KACI NISHIMURA, 10 Huntington Beach "It creates water. Oh! Electricity." SCOTTY SCHULTZ, 8 Huntington Beach "You can do experiments to learn lots of things you could do with science. That kind of helps me in my life." SYDNEY STRABALA, 9 Costa Mesa "Well, if you are trapped in the middle of nowhere, you could somehow make fire and stuff.
NEWS
February 12, 2004
The Huntington Beach Independent went to Peterson Elementary School and asked fourth- and fifth-graders, 'What is the most interesting part of learning about science?' "I think the most interesting part of science is when you get to learn about new things and you can discover new stuff, and you can become famous for it." ALLISON GILLESPIE, 10 Huntington Beach "It's just having fun with what you're making and waiting until it does something to change what you've written down."
NEWS
June 18, 2008
Reading the latest rant from Rep. Dana Rohrabacher on the “pseudoscience” of global warming made my own blood boil. Rohrabacher has the dubious distinction of being prominently featured in Chris Mooney’s “The Republican War on Science.” He still seems to be on that same warpath. Since Rohrabacher seems to know so much about the scientific method and the use of scientific models to make predictions, I would just love to hear him speak to this issue in detail rather than just throw out terms like “pseudoscience” with no explanation.
NEWS
May 11, 2010
Another candidate has entered the running for Huntington Beach City Council, bringing the total pool of contenders to 19. Landon Fichtner, a first-time candidate, filed his intention to run last week. He joins incumbent Joe Carchio and 17 other challengers in the race, in which four council seats are open. Mayor Cathy Green, Mayor Pro-Tem Jill Hardy and Councilman Gil Coerper will be termed out in November. A weather producer for KTLA and science teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District, Fichtner has lived in Huntington Beach for five years.
FEATURES
By Amanda Pennington | June 1, 2006
As traffic zoomed by the Bolsa Chica Wetlands along Pacific Coast Highway on a sunny Surf City day, a group of Marina High School seniors were busily testing water quality and getting a tutorial in native plants and animals. As the students touched a wild fennel plant, Laura Bandy of the Bolsa Chica Conservancy told them the plant is related to licorice and can be eaten. With bewildered stares, some questioned what she had said. Then two boys threw some down the chute. "It's actually good," said Matt Ribas, 17, after he shoved a large piece of the plant in his mouth.
FEATURES
April 1, 2010
The Huntington Beach Union High School District is offering students summer enrichment classes. Summerfest 2010 is open to all students entering fourth to 10th grade for morning and afternoon classes in three two-week sessions. Students can take classes in literature and social science, science and technology, culinary arts, movement and physical fitness, arts and crafts, and visual, multimedia and performing arts. The first session is June 28 to July 9; second session is July 12 to July 23; and the last session is July 26 to Aug. 6. Morning and afternoon sessions run from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Classes are $200 a session, but discounts will be given to students in multiple classes.
NEWS
August 8, 2002
NEIGHBORS is news about Huntington Beach people achieving and doing good in the community. To submit information to this feature please send it to the Independent, Attn.: Neighbors, 18682 Beach Blvd., Suite 160, Huntington Beach, CA 92648, fax it to 965-7174 or e-mail it to hbindy@latimes.com. Air Force Staff Sgt. Karen E. Hiers, daughter of Laurel M. Harper of Crestline and Larry Wilhelm of Huntington Beach, has been deployed to a forward operating area to support the mission of Operation Enduring Freedom.
FEATURES
By MICHELE MARR | June 22, 2006
Like a good many people, I'd dismissed intelligent design as nothing more than biblical creationism trying to slip into our children's classrooms sporting an Einstein mustache and wig ? a plot cooked up by some wily bunch harboring an ulterior motive. How mortified I was to admit that to myself. And I'm ashamed to confess it publicly. I was, though, in the best of company. In December, Pat Morrison, who writes opinions for the Los Angeles Times, described intelligent design as a "not-so-extreme makeover" of creationism, spiffed up by its adherents in order to "contrive the controversy" by which they could then demand it be taught in public schools.
NEWS
By: Dan Beighley | September 29, 2005
They were given a 3-by-5-inch index card, a pair of scissors and the task of cutting a perfect loop that they could fit their bodies through. This was a lesson in thinking outside of the box. The eighth-grade students in Jay Duval's science class at Mesa View Middle School took on their assignment with gusto. "This is easy!" "Oh, I can do this!" After little success, the students balked. "You want us to do what?" "This is going to take a while."
FEATURES
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | November 13, 2008
What’s with this wacky weather? Last Thursday, the forecast was for 80 degrees, which was pretty darn hot for November. But then it hit 90 here in Huntington Beach. Two days later a cold front swept in. On Sunday, it rained cats and dogs in San Diego. It even snowed in the San Bernardino mountains. Our garden is so confused by the weather that it doesn’t know what to do. Our Granny Smith apple tree is blooming, something it normally does only in the spring.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | February 19, 2013
Blending the new with the traditional, Huntington Beach High School has started using 40 iPad 2s in their science department, integrating the device within its curriculum and giving students a more hands-on learning experience. The tablets were funded by the school's Education Foundation, which paid about $22,000 for the first 40 iPads, said Barbi Raban, president of the foundation.
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | February 16, 2011
Oak View Elementary School students learned a thing or two about hearts, just in time for Valentine's Day. They sliced and diced sheep hearts Thursday as part of an after-school academic program. "We're going to dissect sheep hearts so we can learn about the chambers of the heart," said 10-year-old Jesus Medina, who was sporting clear goggles and a plastic apron. The students were put into groups of about four, with a high school student helping each group. They were all required to wear goggles, plastic aprons and latex gloves and were warned not to touch their face or clothes.
NEWS
By Britney Barnes, britney.barnes@latimes.com | September 29, 2010
Standing up, 5-year-old Travis McDonald's chin barely made it over the black countertops of the chemistry lab and he had to reach his arms all the way up to work on a science experiment. Travis chewed gum as he mixed glue with borax, covering his hands in the sticky blue-and-white mixture that was becoming slime. He rolled the gooey substance into a ball and bounced his creation. "It feels like cake," he said. Travis made his own Chem Putty at Polymer Playtime, one of the about two dozen science classes for kids Friday evening at the second annual Science Showtime at Golden West College.
NEWS
May 13, 2010
Another candidate has entered the running for Huntington Beach City Council, bringing the pool of contenders to 19. Landon Fichtner, a first-time candidate, filed his intention to run last week. He joins incumbent Joe Carchio and 17 other challengers in the race, in which four council seats are open. Mayor Cathy Green, Mayor Pro-Tem Jill Hardy and Councilman Gil Coerper will be termed out in November. A weather producer for KTLA and science teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District, Fichtner has lived in Huntington Beach for five years.
FEATURES
April 1, 2010
The Huntington Beach Union High School District is offering students summer enrichment classes. Summerfest 2010 is open to all students entering fourth to 10th grade for morning and afternoon classes in three two-week sessions. Students can take classes in literature and social science, science and technology, culinary arts, movement and physical fitness, arts and crafts, and visual, multimedia and performing arts. The first session is June 28 to July 9; second session is July 12 to July 23; and the last session is July 26 to Aug. 6. Morning and afternoon sessions run from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Classes are $200 a session, but discounts will be given to students in multiple classes.
FEATURES
February 25, 2010
Fourth- and fifth-grade girls will gather at the Pegasus School tonight to show that science and math aren’t just for boys. The school’s Explorers pilot program is hosting an interactive science event “Tinkering with Toys.” The program was created to get girls aged 9 to 11 involved in science, technology, engineering and math while preparing them with the skills needed in the real world. Kim McGrath, the director of fuel cell research at QuantumSphere Inc., and Nafisa Baker, a member of the group Women in Computer Science and an information and computer science student at UCI, will talk about their careers.
FEATURES
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | September 17, 2009
Vic and I didn’t have space last week to report all the great news that we heard at the third annual Bolsa Chica Science Symposium. At this event, sponsored by the Amigos de Bolsa Chica, scientists presented the past year’s monitoring and research results from the restored full tidal basin at Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve. Mario Espinoza, a graduate student in the laboratory of Christopher Lowe at Cal State Long Beach, discussed use of the full tidal basin by sharks and rays.
FEATURES
May 7, 2009
Local students Marisa Poveda and Pauline Vuong of Sowers Middle School and Eva Alvarez of Dwyer Middle School have been selected to get a preview of college life while learning that science can be fun at the Tech Trek Science Camp for Girls, a summer program for seventh-grade girls sponsored by the American Assn. of University Women of California. The students will live on the campus of University of California at San Diego for a week in July, attending classes featuring hands-on experiments.
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