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NEWS
By Mona Shadia and By Mona Shadia | October 17, 2012
It took only 10 years and several rejections and lawsuits, but on Thursday, the California Coastal Commission approved the Shea Homes housing project near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, to the dismay of local environmentalists. The commission voted 6 to 2 in favor of the 50-acre, 111-home project at 17301 Graham St., north of the Wintersburg Channel. The project was first approved by the Huntington Beach City Council in 2002. It has since been delayed, modified, challenged in court and turned down by the commission as environmentalists and proponenets of open space, led by the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, fought to protect the wetlands.
NEWS
December 19, 2002
Paul Clinton The California Coastal Commission is investigating a claim from a local environmental group that developer Shea Homes is improperly removing wetlands habitat from the proposed site of Parkside Estates. The Neighbors for Wintersburg Wetlands Restoration, based in Huntington Beach, brought the charges against the developer of the proposed 170-home project after members of the group noticed what they say was the destruction of wetlands vegetation.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | November 8, 2007
A hotly contested proposed development on open land near the Bolsa Chica Wetlands is coming back to the Coastal Commission at its meeting in San Diego Wednesday, and both sides are preparing for a fight. While developer Shea Homes and the city are requesting 38.5 acres be allowed for residential development, 8.2 acres for park land, and 3.3 acres be set aside as protected open space, Coastal Commission staff members have a different idea. They want 31 acres set aside for conservation on the western side of the property, while only about 19 acres on the northeast end could be used for housing, possibly at higher density than large single-family detached homes.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | August 15, 2012
Displeased with the California Coastal Commission's decision to hold off on voting through its housing project near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, Shea Homes has filed a statement with Orange County Superior Court that claims the commission is not honoring court orders. "Recent events ... suggest the commission's staff may no longer be prepared to honor this court's order or the commission's statutory or regulatory obligations," Shea's court statement said. The commission in October rejected Shea's 50-acre, 111-home project at 17301 Graham St., north of the Wintersburg Channel, leading the developer to file a $55-million lawsuit against the state.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | June 13, 2012
The California Coastal Commission on Wednesday postponed its vote on a housing project it once rejected because of its close proximity to protected habitat near the Bolsa Chica Wetlands. Shea Homes, a 50-acre, 111-home project at 17301 Graham St., north of the Wintersburg Channel, was initially approved by the Huntington Beach City Council in 2002. But a decade-long battle between the developer and environmentalists has kept it from taking shape. The commission elected to continue the issue pending clarification on mitigation efforts at the wetlands.
NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | August 3, 2006
A Coastal Commission hearing next week for the Parkside Estates development in Huntington Beach has spurred a flurry of activity among opponents of the plan, including Bolsa Chica Land Trust members. The fate of 50 acres of the Parkside property, owned by Shea Homes, will be decided during the commission hearing. The area, which lies east of the Bolsa Chica mesa and is part of the wetlands ecosystem, is referred to as the Upper Bolsa Chica wetlands by trust members. The hearing is set to take place Tuesday at the Los Angeles Harbor Hotel in San Pedro.
NEWS
October 24, 2002
Jose Paul Corona The City Council Monday night narrowly approved the controversial Parkside Estates project to be built on Graham Street in southeast Huntington Beach despite the opposition of more than two dozen residents and environmentalists. The project will consist of 171 single-family homes and 8.2 acres of park improvements, all surrounded by a 2-foot retaining walls. Many argue that the 49-acre parcel of land, which lies near the Wintersburg Channel, is a natural wetlands and should be preserved as such.
LOCAL
By Michael Alexander | October 18, 2007
An eroding levee in northeast Huntington Beach is a flood emergency and must be fixed now, county supervisors voted unanimously at their meeting this week. Supervisors authorized $8 million to $10 million to fix 3,800 feet of levee on the East Garden Grove-Wintersburg Channel, a stretch from Graham Street to its opening at Pacific Coast Highway. Orange County Flood Control District officials said the work would take about 75 days after a sped-up bidding process that could get things going by the end of the month.
NEWS
October 12, 2011
The California Coastal Commission on Thursday voted down a housing project near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, putting a new wrinkle in a decade-long battle between the developer and environmentalists. The ruling marks a significant victory for protectors of the wetlands, Councilwoman Connie Boardman said. "I'm just really happy," said Boardman, who is also the president of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust. "I voted against the Shea project when I was on the council in 2002. I'm really glad the Coastal Commission has finally agreed with me. " The City Council originally approved Corona-based Shea Homes' 50-acre, 111-home project and related infrastructure, including roads and public access trails.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | June 1, 2009
The City Council plans to vote tonight on a revised proposal for a development near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, in the latest chapter of a saga that has pitted developers and city officials against activists keen on preserving the land. Members of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust said they plan to attend tonight’s meeting to voice their opposition to the proposal by Corona-based Shea Homes, which plans to erect 111 single-family residential lots on the property east of the wetlands and south of Kenilworth Drive.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mona Shadia and By Mona Shadia | October 17, 2012
It took only 10 years and several rejections and lawsuits, but on Thursday, the California Coastal Commission approved the Shea Homes housing project near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, to the dismay of local environmentalists. The commission voted 6 to 2 in favor of the 50-acre, 111-home project at 17301 Graham St., north of the Wintersburg Channel. The project was first approved by the Huntington Beach City Council in 2002. It has since been delayed, modified, challenged in court and turned down by the commission as environmentalists and proponenets of open space, led by the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, fought to protect the wetlands.
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia | August 15, 2012
Displeased with the California Coastal Commission's decision to hold off on voting through its housing project near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, Shea Homes has filed a statement with Orange County Superior Court that claims the commission is not honoring court orders. "Recent events ... suggest the commission's staff may no longer be prepared to honor this court's order or the commission's statutory or regulatory obligations," Shea's court statement said. The commission in October rejected Shea's 50-acre, 111-home project at 17301 Graham St., north of the Wintersburg Channel, leading the developer to file a $55-million lawsuit against the state.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | June 13, 2012
The California Coastal Commission on Wednesday postponed its vote on a housing project it once rejected because of its close proximity to protected habitat near the Bolsa Chica Wetlands. Shea Homes, a 50-acre, 111-home project at 17301 Graham St., north of the Wintersburg Channel, was initially approved by the Huntington Beach City Council in 2002. But a decade-long battle between the developer and environmentalists has kept it from taking shape. The commission elected to continue the issue pending clarification on mitigation efforts at the wetlands.
NEWS
October 12, 2011
The California Coastal Commission on Thursday voted down a housing project near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, putting a new wrinkle in a decade-long battle between the developer and environmentalists. The ruling marks a significant victory for protectors of the wetlands, Councilwoman Connie Boardman said. "I'm just really happy," said Boardman, who is also the president of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust. "I voted against the Shea project when I was on the council in 2002. I'm really glad the Coastal Commission has finally agreed with me. " The City Council originally approved Corona-based Shea Homes' 50-acre, 111-home project and related infrastructure, including roads and public access trails.
NEWS
June 11, 2009
Once again, I watched with disappointment as our City Council paved the way for more development in open spaces in Huntington Beach (“Council approves Bolsa Chica development,” June 4). This time, they refused to even extend the debate further until a more updated environmental impact report could be completed. No, why wait for further debate when the council is obviously in the pocket of the developers? They have always steamrolled the council in this city, at least for the past 12 years I have lived here.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | June 4, 2009
The controversial plan to develop 111 homes and a park near the Bolsa Chica wetlands took another step forward Monday, as the City Council voted to approve the latest version of a project that has set developers and environmentalists at odds for more than a decade. The council voted 5 to 1, with Mayor Pro Tem Cathy Green absent, in favor of a detailed proposal that laid out streets, park space and other components of the plan by Corona-based Shea Homes. Dozens of residents, including members of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust, attended the meeting to voice their opposition to the project, which they said would damage the wetlands and lead to traffic congestion in the adjoining neighborhood.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | June 1, 2009
The City Council plans to vote tonight on a revised proposal for a development near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, in the latest chapter of a saga that has pitted developers and city officials against activists keen on preserving the land. Members of the Bolsa Chica Land Trust said they plan to attend tonight’s meeting to voice their opposition to the proposal by Corona-based Shea Homes, which plans to erect 111 single-family residential lots on the property east of the wetlands and south of Kenilworth Drive.
FEATURES
By Chris Epting | March 26, 2009
From an “In The Pipeline” column almost two years ago: “I’ve been reading about Mark Bixby for the last few months. He’s the computer engineer-cum- environmental activist who has spent the last five years walking softly and carrying a big camera, documenting one of the last significant open spaces in Huntington Beach (located on the northeast border of the Bolsa Chica Wetlands). The 50-acre plot of land he patrols is called Parkside and while Brea-based Shea Homes is looking to construct up to 150 homes here, Bixby (and others)
LOCAL
By Michael Alexander | March 13, 2008
With emergency work finished on a levee that flood control officials feared would crumble in a major storm, county officials are already planning to shore up the rest of the flood control channel it’s a part of even more thoroughly. Officials held a public meeting this week to inform residents who live near Graham Street and Kenilworth Drive about the repairs to the north side of the East Garden Grove Wintersburg Channel, just below Graham Street. With the emergency repairs done, workers can do heavier work on the channel, said Orange County Flood Control District Manager Nadeem Majaj.
NEWS
By Michael Alexander | November 8, 2007
A hotly contested proposed development on open land near the Bolsa Chica Wetlands is coming back to the Coastal Commission at its meeting in San Diego Wednesday, and both sides are preparing for a fight. While developer Shea Homes and the city are requesting 38.5 acres be allowed for residential development, 8.2 acres for park land, and 3.3 acres be set aside as protected open space, Coastal Commission staff members have a different idea. They want 31 acres set aside for conservation on the western side of the property, while only about 19 acres on the northeast end could be used for housing, possibly at higher density than large single-family detached homes.
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