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ENTERTAINMENT
By By John Volo | October 27, 2005
On a dark, dreary, damp and drizzly day last week, I braved the elements to try some of the homemade soups and chili at Huckleberry's Famous Sandwiches. After realizing how glutton-like I'd look sitting alone with three bowls of soup, I decided to recruit my son Jett and his friend Matt to join me at Huckleberry's. As they were loading into the van in front of school, I prematurely apprised them of our plans. I silenced their screams of displeasure by quickly slamming the door shut and peeling out -- leaving bewildered onlookers to wonder if they'd just witnessed an abduction.
NEWS
November 22, 2001
o7 The Independent went to Harbour View Elementary School in Huntington Beach and asked fourth-graders, "What is your favorite Thanksgiving food?"f7 "Turkey because it has a good flavor, with lots of gravy." Dean Metherell, 9 "Yams with the marshmallows because they taste a lot better." Jeff Smouse, 9 "Both chicken and turkey. We barbecue the little one and put the big one in the oven to roast." Sean O'Connell, 9 "My favorite is lentil soup because it's thick and creamy.
NEWS
July 31, 2003
DINING OUT Seeking a comfort zone for breakfasts where the owner knows your name and you know hers? Drop by Jon's Coffee Shop on Bolsa Chica Street and Heil Avenue and you will be greeted by owner Candice Dubrin, who, nine years ago, inherited the 25-year-old cafe from her dad, Jon Pence. It might be 6 a.m. or 11 p.m. but the light will be on and your friendly server will be ready to bring a warm plate with perfect over-easy eggs, thick toast, orange juice and steaming coffee.
NEWS
November 18, 2004
Roberta McMillan Huff's Restaurant, at the corner of Goldenwest Street and Edinger Avenue, offers an array of home-style American cuisine with large portions at generous prices. Coupons are easily found for this eatery, formerly known as Sunny's, by looking in various newspapers, including coupons for two-for-one breakfasts, lunches and dinners. What I enjoy most about this restaurant, other than the food, is the friendly service and the clean and home-like atmosphere.
NEWS
December 16, 2004
John Volo I planned to lunch with my friend Alison on Friday. What I had not planned on, however, was the arctic chill that swept through Huntington Beach mid-week. With the early morning frosts still fresh in my mind, I knew we needed an eatery that exuded warmth: someplace with steaming soups, hot tea and fresh baked goods. The Java City cafe, in Five Points Plaza, fit the bill perfectly. We elected to sit outside because, on this afternoon, the sun was radiant (not to mention there are much larger tables outside)
NEWS
January 27, 2005
John Volo My buddy Sean (an infomercial fanatic) and I recently went to Kung Pao for lunch. If there were a late night infomercial for Kung Pao, it would probably go something like this: "How much could you expect to pay for a plate of orange flavor beef and fried rice? $6 or $7? What if it also came with an egg roll and a couple of cream cheese wontons? Seven, maybe eight dollars? But wait, there's more: as an additional bonus, we'll throw in tea, a cup of soup and a small dessert.
NEWS
August 10, 2000
Co-owners Terry and Johnson Wei adopted Caucasian first names when they emigrated from Taiwan 20 years ago to become more quickly assimilated into their new country. Lucky for us, they kept their traditional Sichuan cuisine -- one of great variety and subtle shadings. Tables fill quickly in the rose-carpeted double dining room -- mostly with groups eager to order and share one of the 86 menu choices or one of the lunch specials ($4.95 to $5.75). Begin with Three Flavor Sizzling Rice Soup ($7.95)
NEWS
September 12, 2002
DINING OUT A good restaurant, like a good child, usually has someone looking after it -- some one who walks around checking water glasses and the crispness of greens, who sees that hot entries are served on hot plates. It is a place like Phuket Thai. This double storefront of booths and some tables set back from Beach Boulevard just south of Heil Avenue, has server Joseph Paknavin from Bangkok, Thailand to watch over it. We are enticed by the extensive menu with English and Thai names and decide on Mee Krob ($5)
FEATURES
By Candice Baker | December 17, 2008
“Welcome to Hooverville, Capital of Chaos,” a scrawled sign read. Edison High School’s amphitheater last Thursday and Friday looked more like a shanty town than a place of learning, as part of a project on the Great Depression. The temporary cities that were constructed by homeless people during the period were named “Hoovervilles” after the unpopular president of the time, Herbert Hoover, who was seen as responsible for the nation’s economic decline at the time.
NEWS
January 8, 2004
Mary Furr It's a frosty post-holiday day and the place we head for is the Westbay Cafe, which welcomes us with the busy comfort of home -- just to sit and collect ourselves is a pleasure here. Opened in 1996 by the Buettner brothers -- John, Scott, Brad and Jay -- it was a location they often talked about with their dad, Bud, as the perfect spot for a cafe. There's a big, color photo of the whole family on one wall of the bright and busy cafe with its pitched ceiling, beams and wraparound windows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elle Harrow and Terry Markowitz | February 1, 2012
It's the season to feel fluish. Help may come from something Jewish. Long called Jewish penicillin, chicken soup's power to heal has mainly been viewed as folklore but recent scientific studies have proven that it has genuine health benefits, so much so that research doctors in Israel have asked the World Health Organization to add it to the List of Essential Drugs for Infections. Forget pills, sprays and prescriptions. What you really need is hot chicken soup. Around the 12th century, healers started to prescribe " the broth of fowl" for their ill patients.
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FEATURES
By Candice Baker | December 17, 2008
“Welcome to Hooverville, Capital of Chaos,” a scrawled sign read. Edison High School’s amphitheater last Thursday and Friday looked more like a shanty town than a place of learning, as part of a project on the Great Depression. The temporary cities that were constructed by homeless people during the period were named “Hoovervilles” after the unpopular president of the time, Herbert Hoover, who was seen as responsible for the nation’s economic decline at the time.
NEWS
March 22, 2007
SANTA ANA — When Huntington Beach's Liberty Christian School senior Tiffany Frett was 8 years old, she started her culinary creativity, adding ingredients to cans of soup she'd make. From there, she graduated to salads and sandwiches, and by the time she was 12, Frett was preparing whole meals at her Garden Grove home. But when she graduates high school in Surf City this June, she'll be heading for another culinary adventure at the Art Institute of California-Orange County, where she received a $1,000 scholarship as a semifinalist in the school's Best Teen Chef Scholarship Cook-Off Saturday.
FEATURES
By Purnima Mudnal | November 30, 2006
State Sen. Tom Harman of Huntington Beach distributed 120 turkeys to families at Costa Mesa's Someone Cares Soup Kitchen and the American Legion Newport Harbor Post 291 in Newport Beach for Thanksgiving. Harman, along with his staff, distributed a large number of turkeys from Nov. 20 to 22. Legion members planned to distribute turkeys to veterans' families including from Camp Pendleton's 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, which was adopted by Newport Beach. Thanksgiving is that time of the year when families and friends come together to feast and reflect on things they are grateful for, Harman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cherie Mercer Twohy | June 9, 2006
In La Ca"ada Flintridge, the family-run Thai restaurant Min's Kitchen has graced Foothill Boulevard for decades. A recent facelift provided newly sponge-painted walls and a lighter appearance to the small dining room. The honey-colored wood tables and chairs add an elegant touch to the d├ęcor. Nearly everyone who comes in the door seems to be greeted as an old friend, so it is apparent that Min's has a loyal local following. Servers are hospitable and they're patient with menu questions, but things can get a bit slow, as there are frequently two servers for the entire restaurant, and one or both are fielding a brisk take-out business as well as tending tables.
FEATURES
By Amanda Pennington | May 18, 2006
Tuesday morning was dreary and gray at Huntington Beach Pier, but the weather didn't bother Surf City resident and published author B.J. Taylor, whose inspiration comes from the bright spots in her life. She uses these musings, which she said come from her family and heart, as a way to arouse creativity in those who read her work. Taylor's stories have been a natural fit for the "Chicken Soup for the Soul" series, and she's been published in six different "Chicken Soup" books.
BUSINESS
By By Dave Brooks | November 17, 2005
The Assn. of Surfing Professionals sets up shop alongside other local surf groups.It's one of the most powerful acronyms in competitive surfing, and it's coming to Huntington Beach. Surf City is about to be home to the ASP, older brother to the ISA and a surefire way to land another WQS, and maybe -- just maybe -- a spot on the WCT. Don't try to make sense of it all at once -- your head will start to hurt. For now, just remember that Huntington Beach has landed another of the largest organizations in the international surfing community, further solidifying its role as an industry stronghold.
ENTERTAINMENT
By By John Volo | October 27, 2005
On a dark, dreary, damp and drizzly day last week, I braved the elements to try some of the homemade soups and chili at Huckleberry's Famous Sandwiches. After realizing how glutton-like I'd look sitting alone with three bowls of soup, I decided to recruit my son Jett and his friend Matt to join me at Huckleberry's. As they were loading into the van in front of school, I prematurely apprised them of our plans. I silenced their screams of displeasure by quickly slamming the door shut and peeling out -- leaving bewildered onlookers to wonder if they'd just witnessed an abduction.
NEWS
August 30, 2005
and times. By: My favorite Gardner story was when I was doing a surfing column for the Daily Pilot in the early 1970s. He told me how, when he was my age, he used to go bodysurfing at the Wedge in the morning, then bus tables at a pier-side restaurant in the evening. After one pretty bad tumble off a 20-foot wave in the shallow waters off the Wedge -- one in which he swore he saw the sand crabs below scampering to get out of his way -- he headed to work.
NEWS
January 27, 2005
John Volo My buddy Sean (an infomercial fanatic) and I recently went to Kung Pao for lunch. If there were a late night infomercial for Kung Pao, it would probably go something like this: "How much could you expect to pay for a plate of orange flavor beef and fried rice? $6 or $7? What if it also came with an egg roll and a couple of cream cheese wontons? Seven, maybe eight dollars? But wait, there's more: as an additional bonus, we'll throw in tea, a cup of soup and a small dessert.
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