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By Michael Miller, michael.miller@latimes.com | June 29, 2011
Andre Faubert's float may not be the best-looking in Huntington Beach's 4th of July Parade. It may not smell very good, either. But when Faubert's trash sculpture rolls down Main Street, he hopes viewers will agree that it belongs on a flat-bed truck instead of on the beach. Faubert, a Huntington resident and volunteer for the Surfrider Foundation, spent a month earlier this year gathering trash for one hour a day along the city's shoreline. By the time he finished, he had more than 580 pounds of refuse, from bottle caps to plastic bags to Styrofoam and just about everything in between.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
County officials and a Huntington Beach environmental nonprofit have identified possible locations for a pair of booms to keep trash from flowing into the wetlands. Giatho Tran, a project engineer for the Orange County Flood Control Division, said his department has pinpointed spots in the Huntington Beach and Talbert flood control channels and is working with a boom manufacturer to come up with designs. The Huntington Beach Wetlands Conservancy approached the county in 2010 after it finished a restoration project, which removed a levee that had previously stopped storm water from draining into the wetlands.
NEWS
May 5, 2005
Lauren Vane Students from Sun View Elementary School went on an interesting field trip in April, tracking a piece of garbage from the trash can all the way to the landfill. Although the journey was imaginary and the students didn't have to dig through a dumpster, they were taken on a magical tour into the world of recycling. They learned that with a little magic of their own, they can recycle old products into new. Magician and educator Jerry Hart presented the Timothy Wenk "Magic of Recycling" show to Sun View students last week in an assembly that coincided with Earth Day celebrations.
NEWS
January 31, 2002
Residents' fears of rodent infestation and blight caused by overflowing trash bins in Huntington Beach have prompted city officials to consider tightening the rules governing when and how residents and businesses dispose of their garbage. The City Council directed staff to revise language in the city's existing ordinance relating to trash disposal, and for staff to return with its findings at the council meeting Feb. 4. Councilwoman Pam Julien Houchen first raised the issue with staff nine months ago after she heard Downtown residents' complaining about litter left by people scavenging through rubbish in bins.
NEWS
By: ANNIE P. HOVANESSIAN | September 17, 2005
The Burbank Jaycees is headed to Playa del Rey to participate in the 21st annual California Coastal Cleanup Day from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today. Cited by the Guinness Book of World Records as "the largest garbage collection" in 1993, more than 50,000 volunteers will congregate to more than 700 cleanup sites to pick up items dumped on beaches. This is the second year the Burbank Jaycees will participate. "As Jaycees, we are committed to helping the communities we serve and are proud to be part of such a wide scale event," said Jaycee and event organizer Dominic Izon.
NEWS
April 4, 2002
A Huntington Beach man was charged with 11 felony counts of arson Wednesday in connection with a string of fires in trash cans at bus shelters in Westminster, said officials at the Orange County District Attorney's office. Brian Lee Dutch, 23, was arrested Friday night after allegedly setting fire to a trash container in Westminster, officialssaid. Arson investigators with the Orange County Fire Authority and officers from the Westminster Police Department staked out an area near a container on Westminster Ave. Friday.
NEWS
September 4, 2003
VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY Three weeks ago, California Department of Fish and Game biologist Brian Shelton dropped a bombshell. He said that due to the state budget crisis, the state agency would no longer be able to fund trash removal and portable potties at the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve. Unless outside funding could be found, these services would no longer be provided. Because trash removal and a public restroom are so basic, the nonprofit groups affiliated with the Bolsa Chica offered to try to come up with a solution.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | March 2, 2011
It was a cloudy Tuesday morning, but at least 110 students from the Pegasus School in Huntington Beach took to the beach to work on their scientific experiment with a goal to get local officials to notice and do something about plastic on the beaches and in the Santa Ana River. Some of the school's seventh- and eighth-graders have been invited to the 2011 Algalita's Plastics Are Forever International Youth Summit, where they will present their solution for plastic-free bodies of water.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia | May 1, 2012
Huntington Beach Councilman Joe Carchio spent a week walking around with a plastic bag where he kept all the trash he produced, from coffee cups to food wraps and empty bottles. It wasn't because he couldn't find a trash can to drop it in, but because he wanted to get an idea of the impact he has on the environment and see if there's room to improve his habits. "I think the most important thing that I've taken away was how much trash you accumulate individually," Carchio said.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
Jenny Marder It rivaled a garage sale. Objects found at Surf City beaches during the state's biggest annual beach cleanup event included a dreidel, a television, a lawn chair and a sheet of aluminum fencing. Nearly 500 volunteers scoured Surf City shorelines for trash on Saturday as part of the California Coastal Commission's 19th annual Coastal Cleanup Day. At Huntington State Beach and Huntington City Beach combined, 3,005 pounds of trash and 200 pounds of recyclables were collected, said Eben Schwartz, the event's statewide coordinator.
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NEWS
By Michael Miller | August 29, 2012
The massive inflatable turtle shifted in the breeze that whipped across the Huntington Beach Pier on Monday afternoon, looking large and restless enough to crawl across the walkway for a hearty meal at Ruby's Diner. The environmental activists who set up their booth on the pier hadn't anticipated the wind. But the turtle's twitchy movements ended up fitting their message perfectly: that the ocean is full of living things, and that plastic bags are best kept out of it. With the state's two-year legislative session set to end at midnight Friday, members of the Surfrider Foundation, Earth Resource Foundation and Environment California set up a table and solicited signatures for a petition asking lawmakers to support Assembly Bill 298, which seeks to ban single-use plastic bags in many businesses across California.
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia | May 1, 2012
Huntington Beach Councilman Joe Carchio spent a week walking around with a plastic bag where he kept all the trash he produced, from coffee cups to food wraps and empty bottles. It wasn't because he couldn't find a trash can to drop it in, but because he wanted to get an idea of the impact he has on the environment and see if there's room to improve his habits. "I think the most important thing that I've taken away was how much trash you accumulate individually," Carchio said.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
County officials and a Huntington Beach environmental nonprofit have identified possible locations for a pair of booms to keep trash from flowing into the wetlands. Giatho Tran, a project engineer for the Orange County Flood Control Division, said his department has pinpointed spots in the Huntington Beach and Talbert flood control channels and is working with a boom manufacturer to come up with designs. The Huntington Beach Wetlands Conservancy approached the county in 2010 after it finished a restoration project, which removed a levee that had previously stopped storm water from draining into the wetlands.
NEWS
July 27, 2011
As a resident of Huntington Beach for more than 25 years, and a daily commuter on Pacific Coast Highway both north and southbound, I am appalled at the trash (especially plastic bags!) that accumulates along the entire span of Pacific Coast Highway through H.B., but predominantly the stretch between Beach Boulevard and the Santa Ana River Jetties, and also Bolsa Chica State Beach. It is obvious that plastic bags need to be banned in Huntington Beach, but especially at the state beaches, where thousands of people come every day for a day of fun and campfires at night, bringing everything in plastic bags that end up along the highway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller, michael.miller@latimes.com | June 29, 2011
Andre Faubert's float may not be the best-looking in Huntington Beach's 4th of July Parade. It may not smell very good, either. But when Faubert's trash sculpture rolls down Main Street, he hopes viewers will agree that it belongs on a flat-bed truck instead of on the beach. Faubert, a Huntington resident and volunteer for the Surfrider Foundation, spent a month earlier this year gathering trash for one hour a day along the city's shoreline. By the time he finished, he had more than 580 pounds of refuse, from bottle caps to plastic bags to Styrofoam and just about everything in between.
NEWS
By Michael Miller, michael.miller@latimes.com | April 6, 2011
A Huntington Beach environmental nonprofit has partnered with the county in an attempt to block trash from flowing into the ocean through a pair of flood control channels. The Huntington Beach Wetlands Conservancy, a group dedicated to restoring the city's coastal wetlands, and the Orange County Flood Control Division hope to have permits within a year to install booms in the Huntington Beach and Talbert channels, which intersect and drain near the Santa Ana River. The conservancy approached the county last year after it finished a restoration project on the wetlands.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | March 23, 2011
The Huntington Beach City Council on Monday night voted to increase residential trash fees by 34 cents a month, an amount less than what city staff had initially proposed. An annual review of the agreement with Rainbow Disposal Company Inc., which contracts with the city to pick up trash, resulted in an increase in cost of service to be passed onto customers. With the 34-cent fee increase, each household's trash fee will go from $18.62 to $18.96 per month. Rainbow had not increased bills for the past two years.
NEWS
By Mona Shadia, mona.shadia@latimes.com | March 2, 2011
It was a cloudy Tuesday morning, but at least 110 students from the Pegasus School in Huntington Beach took to the beach to work on their scientific experiment with a goal to get local officials to notice and do something about plastic on the beaches and in the Santa Ana River. Some of the school's seventh- and eighth-graders have been invited to the 2011 Algalita's Plastics Are Forever International Youth Summit, where they will present their solution for plastic-free bodies of water.
NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | March 2, 2011
Some people in town are upset because our trash collection fees may go up. Like other homeowners, Vic and I got the notice that the city of Huntington Beach is proposing to raise the residential trash collection fees. Vic thought the proposed fee increase would make a good column topic, but I didn't give it another thought. Costs go up. It seemed reasonable to me that the fees that we pay to cover those costs should also go up. I guess I underestimated the extent to which some residents of this city will protest something as minor as an increase in fees of 64 cents a month.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
Fountain Valley will adjust its street-sweeping and trash-collection schedules by 24 hours to accommodate the three-day holiday weekend. To accommodate Labor Day, trash collection will be pushed to the day after it is normally collected. Trash cans still need to be on the curb by 6 a.m. and put away the following day. Street sweeping times are also being adjusted. Streets swept on Sept. 8 to 9 will be done the following day and areas done on Sept. 10 will be completed on Sept.
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