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FEATURES
By Britney Barnes | June 11, 2009
Elementary school students spent the day at the beach Thursday being trash detectives and learning about recycling and taking care of the planet. Students from eight schools in Orange County participated in the second annual Ocean Day at Bolsa Chica State Beach. About 700 students joined in the Kids’ Adopt-A-Beach Cleanup and then sent out a message to keep the ocean clean by lining up on the beach and spelling out the message “Keep me trash free.” The event was organized by Coastkeeper, a nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting Orange County’s marine habitats and watersheds, and the California Coastal Commission provided funding for the event along with local sponsors, Coastkeeper Education Director Briana Madden said.
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FEATURES
February 4, 2009
Submitted by Jondra Bjorkman Derek Yamashita and Alisa Bjorkman help keep trash under control during the Surf City Marathon. A few weeks ago, Alisa, president of the Huntington Beach High School Oceana Club, wanted to see if there was any protection for the drains this year during the Surf City Marathon, and if not, to volunteer to cover the drains. After several calls, she found Jim Merid, the city’s administrative environmental specialist, who provided information, maps of the drains, sandbags and plastic.
NEWS
December 20, 2007
Trash collection schedules will be changed for the holidays, according to Rainbow Disposal. No trash will be collected Dec. 25 and Jan. 1, both Tuesdays. Collection scheduled for those days, and for the rest of those weeks, will be pushed back one day; Friday collections will be Saturday, for example. Christmas Eve and New Year?s Eve trash collections, however, will be on their regular days. After the holidays are over, Rainbow Disposal will collect discarded Christmas trees, recycle them, and grind them into mulch.
NEWS
May 29, 2003
EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK Have you ever tossed a Coke can in the trash and been on the receiving end of a nasty stare? It happens to me all the time. "Aren't you going to recycle that?" an environmentally conscious friend will ask. I am quick to defend myself and tell them that in Surf City the folks at Rainbow Disposal take care of that task for us. But no one ever seems to believe me. "Do you really believe they sort it?" they scoff. The answer is yes. Now, to be honest, I have never been much of a recycler -- or at least, I have never been gracious about doing it. I simply do not have the space or patience to sort my trash into numerous bins.
NEWS
By Amanda Pennington and Michael Miller | May 25, 2006
Huntington State Beach may look tidier this week after more than 1,000 Orange County students sifted through the sand Monday to pick up trash. On an overcast day with a brief threat of rain, children pulled on plastic gloves and spent the morning extracting pieces of debris from the sand. More than 7,000 students participated in similar programs up and down the California coast for this year's Ocean Day. For the past five years, the Earth Resource Foundation, an Orange County nonprofit group, has contacted elementary schools and invited them to participate in the Ocean Day program.
NEWS
By VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY | September 21, 2006
Our house is like a roach motel for paper. Once a magazine, book or piece of paper checks into our house, it never checks out. This is part of why Vic and I produce only about 16 pounds of trash each per week. In comparison, the average American produces 31 pounds of municipal solid waste per person per week. However, that figure includes waste produced at work as well as at home. About 22 pounds of our trash is newspapers. We dump them in the trash and let Rainbow Disposal recycle them for us. But we recycle our aluminum cans and plastic water bottles to collect the cash.
NEWS
October 2, 2003
"The great aim of education is not knowledge but action." -- Herbert Spencer, English philosopher (1820 - 1903) Nearly 500 volunteers, a vast majority of them children, sprang into action last week, collecting more than 3,000 pounds of trash from Surf City's beaches on California's 19th annual Coastal Cleanup Day last week. Volunteers found a vast array of objects strewn across the state's greatest natural resource -- the usual soda cans, beer bottles and cigarettes, but also televisions, lawn and living room furniture.
NEWS
January 22, 2004
WHAT HAPPENED: The City Council accepted a donation by Rainbow Disposal for additional trash collections Downtown. WHAT IT MEANS: Rainbow Disposal has offered to donate $33,400 worth of additional trash collections on Friday and Saturday in January and February, and on Friday, Saturday and Sunday from March through June. The city covers the cost for Rainbow Disposal to collect trash from 96 public trash bins along Pacific Coast Highway, Main Street and adjoining streets Downtown at a rate of $2 per receptacle.
NEWS
July 27, 2011
As a resident of Huntington Beach for more than 25 years, and a daily commuter on Pacific Coast Highway both north and southbound, I am appalled at the trash (especially plastic bags!) that accumulates along the entire span of Pacific Coast Highway through H.B., but predominantly the stretch between Beach Boulevard and the Santa Ana River Jetties, and also Bolsa Chica State Beach. It is obvious that plastic bags need to be banned in Huntington Beach, but especially at the state beaches, where thousands of people come every day for a day of fun and campfires at night, bringing everything in plastic bags that end up along the highway.
NEWS
February 7, 2002
Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray The rain last week brought the usual mixed blessing to the Bolsa Chica. Fresh water helps the dune and salt marsh plants grow. It brings nutrients to the wetlands and flushes salt from the salt flats. But rain also brings trash and debris to the wetlands. Fortunately, the county now has booms strung across the Wintersburg flood control channel. These booms hold back the bulk of the trash that rain washes into the storm drains and down the flood control channels.
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