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Urban Runoff

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NEWS
April 8, 2004
Alicia Robinson Two new studies point to urban runoff as the delivery system for bacteria and viruses that make swimmers sick in northern Orange County. A paper by a UC Irvine graduate, just published in the American Journal of Public Health, says that urban runoff sickened surfers using Newport and Huntington beaches nearly twice as often as those surfing in rural Santa Cruz County during the winter of 1998. Another study by a UC Irvine professor, to be published later this month in the Journal of Applied Microbiology, says when looking for potential health hazards in water, the state would be better served looking for viruses rather than bacteria levels.
NEWS
January 31, 2002
Paul Clinton City and state leaders representing Huntington Beach are pushing a new program that could help solve the nagging problem of urban runoff that would divert it for treatment through the Orange County Sanitation District. Sanitation district officials have launched an effort to amend the agency's charter so it could accept polluted water that now flows down the watershed into tributaries that lead to the ocean. Under the plan, the water would be pumped through the district's Fountain Valley plant along with the 241-million gallons of sewage treated each day. "It is one of many things that has to happen," district spokeswoman Lisa Murphy said.
NEWS
October 12, 2000
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- City officials are planning a summit of Orange County cities in the hopes of increasing awareness about urban runoff and finding cooperative funding for cleanup efforts. The forum plan comes in the wake of Gov. Gray Davis' veto last month of a $6.9-million bill meant to provide statewide funds to curb urban runoff, pollution caused by fertilizers, illegal storm drain dumping and other cityscape water uses from tainting beaches and watersheds.
NEWS
January 11, 2001
Tariq Malik HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The city, as well as the rest of Orange County, may receive state money earmarked to prevent shoreline pollution from urban runoff and sewage spills. Gov. Gray Davis has included a $100-million beach pollution initiative in his $100-billion state budget package, released Wednesday, to hopefully reduce beach postings and closures over the next few years. "Obviously, we're very pleased with the governor's recognition that this is a statewide problem that needs attention," said Richard Barnard, a city spokesman.
NEWS
March 7, 2002
Bryce Alderton Sanitation district officials may ask cities to chip in half the money to treat dry season urban runoff. For years the Orange County Sanitation District has been searching for ways to clean up the grime that flows through the gutters in Orange County and ends up in the ocean. It has said if cities were willing to help them out financially it would ease the burden and allow them to treat more diverted urban runoff. A district committee will meet on April 4 to decide if it should ask that the treatment of urban runoff come under the umbrella of the Cooperative Project Program, which is funded equally by the sanitation district and the cities it serves.
NEWS
August 24, 2000
Angelique Flores HUNTINGTON BEACH -- The City Council voted to appropriate more money to consultants who are studying the city's urban runoff, a research project that aims to find a solution for the area's beach contamination problems. In January, the city contracted URS Greiner Woodward Clyde and Komex H20 Science Inc. to identify and eliminate bacteria in urban runoff discharges to Huntington Beach. The city amended its contract with URS Greiner Woodward Clyde to total $927,000 and with Komex H20 Science Inc. to total $514,000.
NEWS
June 15, 2000
Kenneth Ma HUNTINGTON BEACH -- County officials last week launched a full-diversion program to treat urban runoff in the Talbert Channel and parts of the Santa Ana River watershed during the dry season months. Diverting and treating runoff, officials said, should prevent a repeat of last year's multiple beach closures in an area from the Santa Ana River to Huntington City Beach. The program will last until the wet season in early fall. "We feel that this is one of the solutions," said Orange County Supervisor Jim Silva, who helped to create the program.
NEWS
August 30, 2001
Bryce Alderton The Orange County Sanitation District will begin capturing and treating urban runoff coming from flood control channels before it hits the beach. Supervisor James W. Silva of the Orange County Board of Supervisors approved project plans Aug. 28 for the installation of permanent pumps to divert more than 95% of contaminated dry season runoff from the Talbert and Lower Santa Ana River watersheds to the Orange County Sanitation District facilities before being sent into the ocean.
NEWS
December 6, 2001
WHAT HAPPENED: City Council unanimously voted to issue a contract to Camp, Dresser & McKee Inc., an engineering, consulting and construction firm, to help the city develop a water-quality management plan. WHAT IT MEANS: The city hopes the plan will improve the city's ability to manage the quality and quantity of dry season urban runoff. It is also an attempt to reduce the polluted urban runoff from going into coastal waters with the help of Geographic Information and Global Positioning Systems.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
NATURAL PERSPECTIVES Summer is nearly upon us. It's time for picnics, ice cream and a swim at the beach. Unless, of course, the beach is closed due to pollution. It seems that every week, some beach somewhere in the Southland is off limits because of high bacterial counts. It's high time something was done to end this nonsense. We know where the pollution is coming from and we know what it does. We know that urban runoff -- the water that trickles off our lawns and driveways -- carries high levels of bacteria, pesticides, herbicides, heavy metals, oils and other noxious substances.
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NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | December 7, 2006
Jim Silva, who served his last term on the Orange County Board of Supervisors this year, was sworn in Monday as the state assembly member from the 67th District at the State Capitol in Sacramento. "I have an awful lot to learn," Silva, 62, said after taking the oath of office. The former Huntington Beach mayor has already waded through more than 40 hours of classroom presentations, including lessons on how to set up office, hiring staff and, most importantly, an eight-hour briefing on how to get a bill passed in the assembly.
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NEWS
By: | October 6, 2005
Top local government officials converged on the Huntington Beach Library Friday for an examination of future priorities. Management Partners Inc. of San Jose, a consulting firm, facilitated the strategic planning session, designed to help the council begin planning for the next 15 years. While city department heads in the crowd watched, the council brainstormed and sometimes debated its goals for the city. Consultant Jan Perkins said most of the ideas had been generated during interviews with the individual council members, but the session also brought a few more thoughts to the table.
NEWS
March 24, 2005
Dave Brooks Business leaders and elected officials retreated to San Diego County wine country last week to discuss the coming year in development and growth in Huntington Beach. The 24th annual Huntington Beach Chamber of Commerce 2005 Planning Conference was a chance for small business owners, land consultants and corporate vice presidents to meet with Huntington Beach's cadre of City Council members and department heads at the Pala Mesa Resort in Fallbrook.
NEWS
November 4, 2004
Dave Brooks Surf City's beaches made the honor roll this year in Santa Monica-based Heal the Bay's annual summertime report card. Eight of the nine local beaches tested by the environmental group received A grades for water-quality during the peak summer tourism season between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Magnolia Street was the only beach within city limits to receive lower than an A, earning a C grade. The grade is an improvement over the past two years -- in 2002 it was given an F grade and a D in 2003.
NEWS
April 8, 2004
Alicia Robinson Two new studies point to urban runoff as the delivery system for bacteria and viruses that make swimmers sick in northern Orange County. A paper by a UC Irvine graduate, just published in the American Journal of Public Health, says that urban runoff sickened surfers using Newport and Huntington beaches nearly twice as often as those surfing in rural Santa Cruz County during the winter of 1998. Another study by a UC Irvine professor, to be published later this month in the Journal of Applied Microbiology, says when looking for potential health hazards in water, the state would be better served looking for viruses rather than bacteria levels.
NEWS
October 9, 2003
The Orange County Sanitation District will spend $300,000 on a study to determine how diverting runoff from county storm drains into the sewage system affects the sewage treatment process. In 1999, after high bacteria levels in Surf City waters led to a string of beach closures that lasted most of the summer, the district began diverting most of its dry season runoff -- about 2.5-million gallons a day -- to its sewage treatment plant. The study, which is expected to begin within the year, will explore whether the sewage treatment plant is adequately treating the runoff.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
NATURAL PERSPECTIVES Summer is nearly upon us. It's time for picnics, ice cream and a swim at the beach. Unless, of course, the beach is closed due to pollution. It seems that every week, some beach somewhere in the Southland is off limits because of high bacterial counts. It's high time something was done to end this nonsense. We know where the pollution is coming from and we know what it does. We know that urban runoff -- the water that trickles off our lawns and driveways -- carries high levels of bacteria, pesticides, herbicides, heavy metals, oils and other noxious substances.
NEWS
November 21, 2002
Jose Paul Corona Irate Huntington Harbour residents, who claim the city's latest attempts to clean up the waterway sound more like a way to make money than a means to solve pollution problems, are demanding they have a say in the matter. In response, the city has agreed to form a committee that will include residents to study the problem. A couple of months ago, the city began studying ways to clean up the harbor and improve water quality. Everything from dredging to various monitoring options was discussed.
NEWS
August 1, 2002
NATURAL PERSPECTIVE It's just a small bean field, 49 acres, but it has set off a big war. The field lies just north of the Wintersburg Flood Control Channel at Graham Street. Sometimes it is bare. Sometimes rye grass grows on it. But usually beans grow there. Historically, the area was part of the Wintersburg Creek watershed, a low lying area covered with a dense thicket of willows. A 1910 map of the Bolsa Chica Gun Club shows that the field was used to grow beans.
NEWS
July 18, 2002
Jack Fancher The opinion letters and editorials printed in newspapers are a forum for "free speech" and opinion not necessarily requiring factual foundation, truth or accuracy. Thus, in an editorial opinion, Danette Goulet expansively concluded that something about the beach would be destroyed by the restoration of Bolsa Chica wetlands. I, and a lot of other people, disagree with that hyperbole. She somehow ignores the 35 to 40 acres of prime sandy beach that have already been destroyed by asphalt pavement or monstrous restrooms.
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