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Water Quality

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NEWS
By Mona Shadia | October 5, 2011
Huntington Beach earned straight As in water quality from Heal the Bay's annual report card, thanks to ongoing efforts to keep the water clean, city officials said this week. The Santa Monica-based nonprofit, which monitors bacteria levels at 447 California locations, gave high marks for most beaches from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Water quality overall was lower this summer, but Huntington Beach was still among 94% of Orange County beaches with A grades. "I think it's great," Councilwoman Connie Boardman said.
NEWS
December 6, 2001
WHAT HAPPENED: City Council unanimously voted to issue a contract to Camp, Dresser & McKee Inc., an engineering, consulting and construction firm, to help the city develop a water-quality management plan. WHAT IT MEANS: The city hopes the plan will improve the city's ability to manage the quality and quantity of dry season urban runoff. It is also an attempt to reduce the polluted urban runoff from going into coastal waters with the help of Geographic Information and Global Positioning Systems.
NEWS
August 31, 2000
Kenneth Ma HUNTINGTON BEACH -- Orange County's newest environmental watchdog took its first assignment this month to monitor the county's beaches. Orange Coast Watch, which has not officially launched yet, was asked by county officials to comment on a study to improve water quality in Aliso Creek, said Vic Leipzig, the organization's executive vice president. Leipzig said the group's launch date hasn't been determined. The study, released last month, suggests ways to plant native vegetation and create wetlands to trap nutrients along the creek, which has long been a hotbed for urban runoff and other contaminants that eventually discharge into the ocean in south Orange County, he said.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
Alicia Robinson A Surf City water body is near the top of a list of Orange County waters with poor water quality, according to a report released by Orange County CoastKeeper and other coastal monitoring groups. The report is based on data collected May 17, a statewide water-monitoring day for various water-quality organizations. The Talbert Channel showed high levels of phosphates and nitrates, which can cause explosive plant growth and kill fish, CoastKeeper project coordinator Ray Hiemstra said.
NEWS
May 26, 2005
Dave Brooks Surf City's beaches made the grade again this year during the tourist off-season, but rainy weather continues to create problems for water quality throughout Orange County. With the exception of the waters between Brookhurst Street and the Santa Ana River mouth, all beaches in Surf City were given an A grade during dry weather in the biannual Heal the Bay Beach Report Card. The portion of Huntington State Beach near the intersection of Brookhurst Street and Pacific Coast Highway was given a B grade, while the Santa Ana River mouth received a C grade.
NEWS
June 26, 2000
Kenneth Ma HUNTINGTON BEACH -- A new environmental watchdog is in the works to monitor Orange County's beaches. The countywide nonprofit organization, dubbed Coastwatch, will serve to educate people and to protect and monitor the county's coastline to improve water quality and curb beach closures, organizers said. It is expected to be launched next month. Coastwatch was created "as a result of the shocking awareness last summer that our urban lifestyle was damaging the beaches," said co-founder Steve Bone, who is president of the Waterfront Hilton Beach Resort.
NEWS
June 19, 2003
Jenny Marder City Administrator Ray Silver and Mayor Connie Boardman spent two days last week lobbying on Capitol Hill for money for unfunded mandates and city programs. They met with Assemblyman Dana Rohrabacher, officials from the Environmental Protection Agency and aides from the offices of Dianne Fienstein and Barbara Boxer to reinforce what the city's lobbyists have been fighting for and to garner federal funding. Huntington Beach has two lobbyists, one in Sacramento and one in Washington, D.C., who are pushing for state and federal funding.
NEWS
January 10, 2002
By now, we hope, those Huntington Beach residents with a true passion for protecting our waters and environment have turned in their comments about proposed changes to the permit regulating what can be washed into the city's storm drains. The permit, which the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board is scheduled to discuss and vote on Jan. 18, will set the rules for what can be sent into storm drains throughout north and cental Orange County for the next five years.
NEWS
May 5, 2005
Andrew Edwards and Dave Brooks A study, led by UC Irvine doctoral student Ryan Dwight, concluded that pollution-related illnesses suffered by swimmers visiting Huntington and Newport beaches could run as high as $3.3 million per year in medical costs. However, while the report made big headlines, many local officials said the study unfairly cast all local beaches in a bad light. "If you look at the most recent water quality report, we have some of the cleanest oceans in the county," Huntington Beach Conference and Visitors Bureau President Doug Traub said.
NEWS
November 8, 2001
During an inaugural silent auction and fund-raiser to benefit its programs the Orange County Coast Keeper honored individuals and organizations that have been actively and positively involved in the preservation and cleanup of Orange County's marine environment last weekend. Among those honored was California Coastal Commissioner Shirley Dettloff, who is also a member of the Huntington Beach City Council. Dettloff was recognized for more than 30 years of commitmentto the environment and her work in the community.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | May 6, 2013
Huntington Beach Mayor Connie Boardman wants to send a letter asking the California Coastal Commission to deny Poseidon Resource's permit application. She will be asking council members Monday to allow her to write the commission addressing "substantial issues" found in the desalination plant producer's application. Boardman initially wrote a lengthy letter that included the Coastal Commission's opinions in its 2010 appeal. That letter was mentioned in the City Council agenda for its May 1 meeting but it has since been shortened to simply ask commissioners to deny Poseidon's request, she said.
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NEWS
By Mona Shadia | October 5, 2011
Huntington Beach earned straight As in water quality from Heal the Bay's annual report card, thanks to ongoing efforts to keep the water clean, city officials said this week. The Santa Monica-based nonprofit, which monitors bacteria levels at 447 California locations, gave high marks for most beaches from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Water quality overall was lower this summer, but Huntington Beach was still among 94% of Orange County beaches with A grades. "I think it's great," Councilwoman Connie Boardman said.
NEWS
June 7, 2007
The Heal the Bay conservation group had some good news for us in its annual Beach Report Card on coastal water quality. Huntington Beach, like its counterparts elsewhere in Orange County, racked up good grades in the report and avoided the dreaded "Beach Bummers" list of the 10 worst beaches in California. Seven of those were in Los Angeles County. Most of the city's beaches nearly scored straight A's. This is great news, because it means when you swim in the ocean or hit the surf, you can do so with a great deal more confidence.
LOCAL
By Amanda Pennington | June 8, 2006
The Surfrider Foundation is beginning a new water-quality monitoring program to watch over the area where a new Bolsa Chica inlet will be opened in late summer or early fall. The nonprofit organization has partnered with Surfline, a surf forecasting company based in Huntington Beach, to keep an eye on water quality as construction on the inlet proceeds. The organizations' volunteers were trained Saturday, and will devote three days a week to testing the water. "What this monitoring program is all about is to monitor the area before it's opened up so we can get a basic idea of baseline conditions, and then continue to monitor for at least a few months after it's opened," said Rick Wilson, Surfrider's coastal management coordinator.
FEATURES
June 1, 2006
Who would have guessed it? All it takes to keep our beaches and oceans clean is a bit of a drought. A report released last week by Heal the Bay, a water-quality watchdog group based in Santa Monica, found that the quality of water of Huntington Beach was just fine when the weather was dry. All along Huntington's coast, from Bolsa Chica to the Santa Ana River, the water got A or A+ grades from the group in its annual Beach Report Card survey....
NEWS
By: Chris Martin | September 2, 2005
Mayor Elizabeth Pearson claims that because of Laguna's beaches, we have fiscal expenses that many other cities don't have. Let's be accurate as to the general structure of this budget. First of all, many of our beaches are under county jurisdiction, which means the city doesn't pay anything for their lifeguards and other services. All of South Laguna can be included in this category. Laguna is not the only city to have unique expenses. Anaheim has Disneyland.
NEWS
By: | August 25, 2005
Assurances not enough for plant The Poseidon Desalination Project environmental review should not be approved by the Huntington Beach City Council. The cumulative uncertainties and risks of this project are not balanced by potential benefits to the city or its residents. First, the environmental effects of dumping 7,000 tons of salt concentrates per day produced by Poseidon back into Huntington Beach's coastal waters can only be guessed at. The only assurance of such guesswork is that coastal water quality will not improve as a result.
NEWS
By: Andrew Edwards | August 23, 2005
Newport Beach has hired Orange County Coastkeeper to find out how much copper and other heavy metals may be lingering in the waters near Newport's marinas -- work that could lead to restrictions on the paint most boaters use. "We will definitely start sampling in September," Coastkeeper program director Ray Hiemstra said. Coastkeeper is still designing plans to sample waters and sediments around six to eight local marinas. The city subcontracted the work to Coastkeeper after making a deal with the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board to look for copper and other heavy metals in the harbor, said assistant city manager Dave Kiff.
NEWS
By: | July 31, 2005
As with most studies related to our ocean's and our harbor's safety and cleanliness, a report last week covering 2004 contained good and bad news. First the bad news from Testing the Waters, which was compiled by the Natural Resources Defense Council: There were 939 beach advisories or closures last year in Orange County and, closer to home, the water in the harbor at 33rd Street and near the intersection of Newport Boulevard and West Coast Highway was persistently unhealthy.
NEWS
May 26, 2005
Dave Brooks Surf City's beaches made the grade again this year during the tourist off-season, but rainy weather continues to create problems for water quality throughout Orange County. With the exception of the waters between Brookhurst Street and the Santa Ana River mouth, all beaches in Surf City were given an A grade during dry weather in the biannual Heal the Bay Beach Report Card. The portion of Huntington State Beach near the intersection of Brookhurst Street and Pacific Coast Highway was given a B grade, while the Santa Ana River mouth received a C grade.
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