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NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | February 1, 2012
Thursday is Groundhog Day. According to legend, if a groundhog comes out of hibernation and sees its shadow on this day, we will have six more weeks of winter. We sure could use more winter. Since California, like most of the United States, hasn't had much of real winter yet, our only chance for a good snow in the mountains lies ahead of us. It's been so warm that some pundits were calling the past month "Junuary. " Let's hope that Mr. Groundhog doesn't see his shadow, because we sure need the snow.
NEWS
By: | August 25, 2005
In 2003, the City Council rejected Poseidon's environmental report and identified three issues the company needed to resolve. Nearly two years later, Poseidon officials argued that they've met those demands and city staff has signed off on the report, but concerns linger from nearby neighbors and environmentalists. Here's an update on the three issues that might come up during the desalination debate: Marine life o7The Issuef7: The original report didn't adequately address the impact of Poseidon's use of AES' intake pipeline on marine life.
NEWS
May 21, 2008
It’s no secret that California is facing a water crisis. Environmentalists have been warning the public for years, and now public policy makers are beginning to pay attention. Fountain Valley is looking to boost water prices because the city needs the money to maintain its water system. The Huntington Beach Public Works Department is cutting down on its watering, a move that will save more than $87,000 each year. Last week Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa announced a 20-year, $1.5 billion water supply strategy.
NEWS
By: Elia Powers | September 11, 2005
As far as crises go, the Newport Beach water shortage of 1956 and 1957 won't top anyone's list. Still, for residents living in the area and for former City Manager Robert Shelton, it did take a coordinated effort to avert a major problem. Shelton -- who worked for the city from 1956 to 1961 and later served on the City Council -- said that back then Newport Beach's population was about 17,000 during the winter, and double that during summer months.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | November 2, 2009
The lieutenant governor of California has urged Poseidon Resources, the company that plans to build a desalination plant in Huntington Beach, to seek more environmentally friendly ways of creating drinkable water. Lt. Gov. John Garamendi, in a letter dated July 15, told Poseidon Chairman and Chief Executive James M. Donnell that he would oppose any new desalination plants that use ocean water until all options for treating wastewater had been tested and rejected. Using wastewater would use less electricity and have a much smaller environmental impact than using ocean water, he said.
NEWS
January 20, 2005
Make no mistake: A plan in the works to ensure Huntington Beach's future drinking water supply is a tough one to swallow. It's an idea that obviously will take some getting used to, and one that raises legitimate questions about safety standards. The $600-million plan being proposed by the Orange County Water District would convert 150-million gallons of treated sewage water each day into potable water, for use both in the tap and to keep seawater from entering the area's underground aquifer.
NEWS
January 9, 2003
NATURAL PERSPECTIVES In a recent column, we wrote about the Orange County groundwater basin, how it is currently over-drafted and how Huntington Beach is likely to face cuts in the amount of water we can draw from it. The backup supply for Huntington Beach is the Metropolitan Water District, which gets water from Northern California and from the Colorado River. Well, it turns out that the Metropolitan Water District may not be such a reliable source, either.
FEATURES
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | December 24, 2009
This change has been written on the wall for a long time. The writing was faint, but we could see it. A growing population plus a dwindling water supply add up to bad news. The City Council passed a new water restriction ordinance in November that will go into effect Jan. 6. That’s less than two weeks from now. The ordinance includes:  Irrigation of lawns/landscaping is prohibited between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.  Irrigation is limited to a maximum of 15 minutes per day per station.
NEWS
By VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY | June 7, 2007
hbi-natperspectives07 A couple of months ago, I was asked to give a talk on that topic to staff at the Orange County Conservation Corps. Vic suggested I lead off with pictures of California to show what a beautiful planet we live on. I chose a picture of Bolsa Chica and one of Yosemite.
NEWS
By By Dave Brooks | October 13, 2005
In bid to convince council, company officials say they will provide discounted water to Huntington.Poseidon is offering Huntington Beach a discounted water supply in hopes of securing approval for its desalination facility at Monday's meeting. Officials with the Connecticut-based company said they're prepared to sell Huntington Beach three million gallons of water per day at a rate 5% cheaper than it currently pays the Municipal Water District of Orange County if the city gives it a conditional use permit to build a $250-million desalination plant behind the AES power plant at Newland Avenue and Pacific Coast Highway.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | May 1, 2012
Vic and I attended the Newport Beach Film Festival this past weekend. Naturally, Vic and I focused on environmental documentaries. We saw three films, "A Fierce Green Fire,""Last Call at the Oasis,"and"Bitter Seeds. " "A Fierce Green Fire" is based on the book of the same name. The film explored the history of environmentalism from John Muir's failed attempt to save the Hetch Hetchy valley north of Yosemite from being dammed, up to today's battle to slow global warming.
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NEWS
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | February 1, 2012
Thursday is Groundhog Day. According to legend, if a groundhog comes out of hibernation and sees its shadow on this day, we will have six more weeks of winter. We sure could use more winter. Since California, like most of the United States, hasn't had much of real winter yet, our only chance for a good snow in the mountains lies ahead of us. It's been so warm that some pundits were calling the past month "Junuary. " Let's hope that Mr. Groundhog doesn't see his shadow, because we sure need the snow.
FEATURES
By Vic Leipzig and Lou Murray | March 25, 2010
In 1992, the United Nations designated March 22 as World Water Day. The first celebration was in 1993. That’s why you may have noticed increased media coverage of water lately. For example, the entire April issue of National Geographic is devoted to water stories. One article, “California’s Pipe Dream: A heroic system of dams, pumps and canals can’t stave off a water crisis,” is about Southern California. Southern California is in a real water crisis, and it’s not going to go away.
NEWS
By Michael Miller | November 2, 2009
The lieutenant governor of California has urged Poseidon Resources, the company that plans to build a desalination plant in Huntington Beach, to seek more environmentally friendly ways of creating drinkable water. Lt. Gov. John Garamendi, in a letter dated July 15, told Poseidon Chairman and Chief Executive James M. Donnell that he would oppose any new desalination plants that use ocean water until all options for treating wastewater had been tested and rejected. Using wastewater would use less electricity and have a much smaller environmental impact than using ocean water, he said.
NEWS
May 21, 2008
It’s no secret that California is facing a water crisis. Environmentalists have been warning the public for years, and now public policy makers are beginning to pay attention. Fountain Valley is looking to boost water prices because the city needs the money to maintain its water system. The Huntington Beach Public Works Department is cutting down on its watering, a move that will save more than $87,000 each year. Last week Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa announced a 20-year, $1.5 billion water supply strategy.
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