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Wildlife

LOCAL
By Purnima Mudnal | January 25, 2007
Another $1,000 reward is being offered for information about a mallard shot with an arrow after wildlife volunteers recently offered the same amount for an Egyptian goose that had been similarly injured. The mallard was rescued by two Good Samaritans on Jan. 10 in Costa Mesa and is recovering at the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center in Huntington Beach. The people, who were not identified, rescued the bird from a flood control drain at California and Iowa streets. Costa Mesa animal control officials delivered the injured bird to All Creatures Care Cottage, an animal hospital in Costa Mesa, and later moved him to the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center in Huntington Beach.
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NEWS
By Purnima Mudnal | November 24, 2006
California Coastal Commissioners have barred a Huntington Harbour homeowners association from cutting or trimming any trees in the area that are home to great blue herons and egrets. In a Nov. 15 ruling, the commission required the Tennis Estates Homeowners Assn. to cease any development that would harm heron and egret nesting or roosting areas. The homeowners association was also ordered to plant three pine trees to replace a tree it chopped down at Humboldt Drive and Saybrook Lane.
NEWS
By VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY | November 16, 2006
On Friday, Vic and I went to the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach with Laura Bandy, education director of the Bolsa Chica Conservancy, and Bob Adams of the Southern California Marine Institute. Although this sounds like a lark, we were there as science instructors for a field trip with the Orange County Conservation Corps. Thanks to the generosity of aquarium management, we were able to take all 40 high school students from the Corps for free. I had made a worksheet for the students to fill out as they went through the three main habitat areas of the aquarium — Southern California and Baja, Northern Pacific and Tropical Pacific — plus the gallery of venomous creatures of Southern California, the lorikeet forest and the shark lagoon.
NEWS
By VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY | August 3, 2006
Vic led his Golden West College introductory biology class on a field trip to Shipley Nature Center last week. It was interesting to see Shipley through their eyes in the brief reports they wrote about their experiences. With their permission, we decided to share a few of their observations and remarks with you. Patricia Ceballos wrote, "A group of people who thought Shipley was worth saving made the decision that volunteers could take on the large task of transforming Shipley back into a native center.
NEWS
July 28, 2006
CORONA DEL MAR — It's hard out here for a pelican. After a June 22 collision with a car windshield in Laguna Beach, a now-recovered California brown pelican nicknamed "Crash" recently was released at the water's edge in Corona del Mar State Beach. Workers from Huntington Beach's Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center, which nursed the young female bird back to health, also released 10 other pelicans that had been victims of fishing lines and hooks or starvation. Crash may have hit the car because she'd been poisoned by domoic acid, a substance produced by red tide algae that is eaten by fish, which are then eaten by birds.
NEWS
July 27, 2006
CORONA DEL MAR ? It's hard out here for a pelican. After a June 22 collision with a car windshield in Laguna Beach, a now-recovered California brown pelican nicknamed "Crash" recently was released at the water's edge in Corona del Mar State Beach. Workers from Huntington Beach's Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center, which nursed the young female bird back to health, also released 10 other pelicans that had been victims of fishing lines and hooks or starvation. Crash may have hit the car because she'd been poisoned by domoic acid, a substance produced by red tide algae that is eaten by fish, which are then eaten by birds.
NEWS
By VIC LEIPZIG and LOU MURRAY | June 8, 2006
The news last week carried a story of pine trees at the Tennis Estates in Huntington Harbour being pruned. The trees had nesting egrets in them. After reports of dead chicks, broken eggs and destroyed nests in the pile of branch prunings, the California Department of Fish and Game warden placed a 30-day stop notice on the pruning. There can be no prosecution if there is no evidence of a crime. Broken egg shells are left behind naturally when a chick hatches. The parent birds generally carry the shells away and drop them.
NEWS
By: VIC LEIPZIG AND LOU MURRAY | October 13, 2005
Like it or not, we live in the midst of wildlife, even in Huntington Beach. Or wildlife lives in our midst. It depends on how you look at it. Some of us are thrilled by the wildlife around us, and some are not. Partly that depends on how you view wildlife, and partly it depends on how the wildlife is affecting you. For example, it's fun to see cute baby skunks parading behind mama skunk. But it isn't so nice to smell them. And it really isn't nice if your pet tangles with one and then comes into the house.
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