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Wintersburg

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NEWS
By JERRY PERSON | May 11, 2006
Wintersburg, that oasis of culture and refinement surrounded by lush fields, is vastly different today than it once was. Kids today cannot imagine what life was like before the automobile, television or even indoor plumbing. Before the 1920s the mode of travel was by horse as few farmers could afford the price of an automobile. Radio was still in the future, and the only entertainment came from traveling vaudeville shows or gramophone records. But in spite of the lack of what we take for granted today, the little farming community was a wonderful place to raise a family.
NEWS
April 28, 2005
JERRY PERSON It was in January 1965 that a young factory representative of the Hudson Car Co. from Illinois joined the Wintersburg Methodist Church. Having come from a very religious family in Illinois, Dix Helland settled here to become a longtime church member. One of his grandfathers had been a Lutheran minister in Illinois and his other grandfather was a circuit-riding Methodist minister, who rode from one town to another in Illinois, preaching God's Word.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | March 13, 2014
If someone asked Mary Urashima a decade ago about the history of the Wintersburg site in Huntington Beach, she probably wouldn't have had much to say. The public affairs consultant and former journalist has plenty to discuss now. She has spent seven years researching the effect the 4.4-acre site on Warner Avenue and Nichols Lane had on the city and Orange County. Much of her work is chronicled on her blog, historicwintersburg.blogspot. com, but she has also fixed her research in a more-permanent form with her first book, "Historic Wintersburg in Huntington Beach.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 24, 2013
The fate of the historic Wintersburg site remains unclear after a vote by the Huntington Beach Planning Commission to do further studies into a request to change the property's zoning. Wintersburg was the site of a Japanese American community that began in the late 1800s. It grew to become a cultural center that included homes, a mission and farmland. Now the area sits uninhabited but maintains a cultural significance as the site of the 1912 Furuta home, the 1910 Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Mission, 1910 Manse, and the 1934 Church.
NEWS
September 27, 2001
Mike Sciacca From poodle skirts to miniskirts, Scott Flanagan saw it all as an educator in the Huntington Beach Union High School District. Flanagan, a man who gave outstanding service to the district, died from complications following a stroke on Sept. 10 at the age of 86. Flanagan spent 27 years with the high school district, first as a teacher, then as principal at Huntington Beach High School, before retiring in 1976 as assistant superintendent of the district.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio and By Anthony Clark Carpio | June 28, 2013
Attorneys acting on behalf of the Ocean View School District in Huntington Beach have appealed a proposed 510-unit apartment complex out of concern for how it would affect its schools. Planning commissioners Tuesday reviewed the Pedigo Apartments project, which is proposed for the southwest corner of Edinger Avenue and Gothard Street. Associate Planner Jill Arabe briefed commissioners on the project and noted an appeal made by the district's attorneys Monday. Connor, Fletcher & Williams LLP sent Arabe a letter stating several concerns about the development, mainly that it would generate additional students that the school district cannot accommodate.
NEWS
By Jerry Person | February 28, 2008
Our city can be very proud of its modern library system of a central library and its four branches that are scattered throughout our city for easy reach of our residents and visitors. Those of you who live downtown have probably noticed the closure of the Main Street library for renovation. Our library system dates back to the time of our city incorporation in 1909 when A.E. Everett, A.L. Reed and Alma Wilson were chosen as trustees for the new Public Library Association of Huntington Beach.
NEWS
April 7, 2005
JERRY PERSON This year is going to be a very special one for the people of Huntington Beach, as several of our venerable institutions reach the ripe old age of 100. It's not so easy to reach such an ancient age, especially in today's fast-paced society. This was brought into sharp focus for me a few days ago when Lionel Grove from the Community United Methodist Church stopped in to see me with information on his beloved church's 100th birthday.
NEWS
March 4, 2004
JERRY PERSON There are still a few residents of Huntington Beach that may not know several of our streets were named for early families who lived and worked here. This week, we will look back at three individuals whose last names should be familiar to us -- Gothard, Nichols and Heil. It was on Feb. 24, 1852, that George Gothard was born in Jo Daviess County, Ill. George attended and received his formal education in the public schools of that state, and in 1874, when George was 22 years old, he moved to California to live in Anaheim and grow grapes.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | October 23, 2013
Cement crushing at a Huntington Beach waste management facility has ceased after the Ocean View School District heard complaints from residents and parents during a recent school board meeting. But the district and its attorney aren't satisfied with just the halting of the crushing operation, which they say causes a fine dust to fill the surrounding area. They're in talks with Rainbow Environmental Services to have the local company cover its piles of waste and grinded material at its site on Nichols Lane.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 9, 2014
Local preservationists tried convincing Huntington Beach council members Monday to support efforts to save the buildings on the Wintersburg site. Despite many pleas, the City Council voted 3 to 4 against asking Mayor Matthew Harper to send a letter to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in support of getting the property included on the organization's list of 11 most endangered places. Council members Jill Hardy, Connie Boardman and Joe Shaw voted in favor of taking the action.
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NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | March 13, 2014
If someone asked Mary Urashima a decade ago about the history of the Wintersburg site in Huntington Beach, she probably wouldn't have had much to say. The public affairs consultant and former journalist has plenty to discuss now. She has spent seven years researching the effect the 4.4-acre site on Warner Avenue and Nichols Lane had on the city and Orange County. Much of her work is chronicled on her blog, historicwintersburg.blogspot. com, but she has also fixed her research in a more-permanent form with her first book, "Historic Wintersburg in Huntington Beach.
NEWS
By Chris Epting | February 25, 2014
"I'm an accidental historic preservationist," Mary Urashima, a government and public affairs consultant, says with a laugh. That may be the case, but she is also a published author and passionate advocate for the subject of her first book, "Historic Wintersburg in Huntington Beach. " It started back in the early 1980s, when she used to pass by the small farming property owned by the Furuta family on Warner Avenue near Gothard Street. "Something about it called to me," she told me recently.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | November 6, 2013
Supporters of the Wintersburg site in Huntington Beach will have 18 months to figure out how to preserve its historical structures. The deadline comes with the City Council's decision Monday to approve on a 4-3 vote the much-debated environmental impact report allowing demolition at Warner Avenue and Nichols Lane. With the vote, Rainbow Environmental Services, which owns the site, has the green light to start demolition, but the local company must wait 18 months to let preservationists save the six buildings on site that were part of the first Japanese Presbyterian Church in Orange County.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | October 23, 2013
Cement crushing at a Huntington Beach waste management facility has ceased after the Ocean View School District heard complaints from residents and parents during a recent school board meeting. But the district and its attorney aren't satisfied with just the halting of the crushing operation, which they say causes a fine dust to fill the surrounding area. They're in talks with Rainbow Environmental Services to have the local company cover its piles of waste and grinded material at its site on Nichols Lane.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | August 21, 2013
The Wintersburg site's six historic buildings have been spared from demolition - at least for now. A divided Huntington Beach Planning Commission on Tuesday turned down a request by Rainbow Environmental Services to clear the 4.4-acre property, which it owns, referring the issue to the City Council for a final decision. Wintersberg was once the site of a Japanese American Presbyterian Church founded in the 1880s and related settlements. The property is perhaps best known for the "Jesus Saves" mural facing Warner Avenue, and preservationists are fighting save it. Though the property doesn't have formal state or federal historic status, the city's general plan recommends preservation of historic-era structures.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio and By Anthony Clark Carpio | June 28, 2013
Attorneys acting on behalf of the Ocean View School District in Huntington Beach have appealed a proposed 510-unit apartment complex out of concern for how it would affect its schools. Planning commissioners Tuesday reviewed the Pedigo Apartments project, which is proposed for the southwest corner of Edinger Avenue and Gothard Street. Associate Planner Jill Arabe briefed commissioners on the project and noted an appeal made by the district's attorneys Monday. Connor, Fletcher & Williams LLP sent Arabe a letter stating several concerns about the development, mainly that it would generate additional students that the school district cannot accommodate.
NEWS
By Anthony Clark Carpio | April 24, 2013
The fate of the historic Wintersburg site remains unclear after a vote by the Huntington Beach Planning Commission to do further studies into a request to change the property's zoning. Wintersburg was the site of a Japanese American community that began in the late 1800s. It grew to become a cultural center that included homes, a mission and farmland. Now the area sits uninhabited but maintains a cultural significance as the site of the 1912 Furuta home, the 1910 Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Mission, 1910 Manse, and the 1934 Church.
NEWS
By Chris Epting | March 18, 2013
The author Michael Crichton said, "If you don't know history, then you don't know anything. You are a leaf that doesn't know it is part of a tree. " And so I think he would've been impressed by the many messages I received last week in reaction to my column on tracing where the Pacific Electric Red Car trolley lines used to run throughout Huntington Beach. Not unlike the reaction I got after the recent Meadowlark Airport columns I wrote, the words from readers were passionate, nostalgic and even a bit mournful for these bygone things that once helped sculpt the city of Huntington Beach.
NEWS
By Andrew Shortall | November 20, 2012
The Historic Wintersburg Preservation Task Force raised between $2,500 and $3,000 over the weekend with a benefit reception and four screenings of the film "Lil Tokyo Reporter. " The short film told the story of Japanese-American civil-rights activist Sei Fujii and was shown Saturday and Sunday at the Charter Centre Cinemas. The meet-and-greet reception with the directors and cast was held Saturday evening at the Hilton Waterfront Beach Resort in Huntington Beach. "We are very pleased with this, as our goal in this very first event of our first few months as a committee was both friend-raising and fundraising," said Task Force Chair Mary Urashima, adding that money may still be coming as a result of the event.
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